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-1

Stall as a term refers to the speed of the airflow where the lift produced by the wing becomes significantly less than the weight carried by the wing. when that condition occurs the airflow (actually the wing moves through the static air) is too weak to sustain a stable flight and the entire plane takes an uncontrollable path down. The previous attitude of ...


1

A stall is not a free-fall. It is a loss of laminar airflow over the wing, resulting in a loss of lift. The response to a stall is to stop the (usual) roll induced by one wing stalling before the other. Then drop the nose - most aircraft will do this by design - until you achieve a flyable speed with proper airflow over the wing. The problem here is that ...


26

If the cables break on an elevator (and the safety brakes fail), you won't be in true freefall. You'll still have friction from wind resistance, from the guide rollers on the rails, etc. The same is true in an airplane. Even if you're falling straight down, you'll still have wind resistance. In addition, lift doesn't just drop straight to zero when the wing ...


7

Is a “stalled” aircraft free-falling? No! If I was in an elevator in a sky-scraper, and the cable broke, I would free fall and feel weightless (until hitting the ground of course). When I stall an airplane(power-off) and the wings stop producing lift, why doesn't the same effect occur? Because in a stall, the aerodynamic force component acting against ...


-2

Deep stalls appears not only for the T tails aircraft. The CG far back will certainly be a good reason to have one of this type of stall. Nowadays the fighter jets are prone to get into the deep stall state. Recovery is done by pushing the nose down and power up.


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