New answers tagged

0

All else equal, you are correct that the angle of attack on the retreating blade tip will actually decrease, not increase. As you calculated, the horizontal component of the flow shrinks, causing the inflow angle to grow (and effectively shrink the angle of attack). However, the "all else equal" isn't realistic. Unless there's angular ...


0

Every aircraft has a stall speed, usually landing above stall speed. When an aircraft stalls, this means the aircraft no longer generates lift to keep it in the air and falls down from lost lift. This doesn't occur in everyday landings. If an aircraft were to stall, the pilots made gross errors in flight landing configurations, unexpected large wind gusts ...


1

You are missing perspective. Airliners, even smaller ones, are very large relative to most flying objects we're used to seeing (namely, birds). When they are not literally on the ground it is very hard to get proper perspective on their actual speed relative to us, and it looks like they are "hanging" in midair. In addition, planes are going their ...


2

Typically, such wording means that the "specific configuration" must be stipulated when the designation is actually used. That is, it may depend on the context. Indeed, in the body of the document we see for "Light-sport aircraft" (emphasis mine): A maximum stalling speed or minimum steady flight speed without the use of lift-enhancing ...


Top 50 recent answers are included