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32

The F-14 is special; to stop the flat spin you need to pull on the stick. Then the spin can be recovered from. This is different from what you learn about regular spins, where pushing the stick would be a better recovery method. In a flat spin, the forward fuselage dominates the aerodynamic forces, and we all know there are no control surfaces which could ...


31

It's an illusion that the blades appear to be going slowly. It's actually a well known effect called the wagon wheel effect. Essentially the rotor is spinning at close to an even multiple of the camera's framerate divided by the number of rotors. This means that between frames the blades have moved a full quarter rotation (or a multiple of that). Creating ...


30

One of the more common causes of crash and fatality is a low altitude stall-spin. A spin, in a modern aircraft, isn't of itself deadly -- with many designs, all you have to do it let go of the controls, and the aircraft will unstall and let you simply fly out of the resulting spiral dive (if you don't wait too long and go past Vne, anyway). If you get into ...


19

There are at least three FARs that apply (maybe more?). First, "aerobatics" as defined in 91.303 seems to include spinning: For the purposes of this section, aerobatic flight means an intentional maneuver involving an abrupt change in an aircraft's attitude, an abnormal attitude, or abnormal acceleration, not necessary for normal flight. That means ...


18

Provided you meet ALL of the requirements for utility category operation as spelled out in the POH (within W&B limits for the utility envelope, no aft passengers, empty baggage compartment, and anything else you may find in the Limitations and W&B sections of your POH) a Cessna 172 is approved for intentional spins, and may be used for spin training. ...


18

As Ron Beyer pointed out in a comment, your instructor was showing you a forward slip - a pretty standard maneuver for light aircraft. A spin would involve full rudder and a stalled wing, which usually means pulling the yoke or stick back a lot. That's why overshooting the base-to-final turn can be dangerous - you likely already have a lot of rudder in and ...


16

I do not want to speak for civilian training here, and I do know that each aircraft has its own set of emergency procedures. Those procedures will depend upon the instrumentation that you have available to you. In my case I had full IFR instrumentation with a state of the art inertial navigation system. Spin recovery should be in the set of immediate action ...


16

9000 feet is not likely if the pilot applied recovery techniques in a timely manner. US Army Air Force spin tests found here resulted in an average of 3000-6000 ft alt loss. There are several memos on it all resulting in similar figures. This one dated 6/26/1943 shows 5500 feet for P-51A This one from 4/30/1944 shows 3000-6500 ft for P-51B The longest ...


15

There were a lot of other mitigating factors in the Colgan Air 3407 crash. Was that one recoverable? It depends. It never should have got to the point of a stall in the first place. It was more preventable than recoverable. But in answer to your question, again, it depends. Every aircraft in the air can stall and be recovered, if responded to properly. But ...


15

Entirely possible, although it is the turn coordinator not the artificial horizon that is primary -- to determine the direction of the spin. Nose-down elevator, rudder opposite the spin, the when spinning stops recover from the dive using airspeed & altimeter for pitch control & the turn coordinator for roll. Those instruments don't tumble. I'm ...


15

I'm going to make an assumption that solo student flights are in scope here, in which case I would say that flight into IMC (Instrument Meteorological Conditions) would quite often be unrecoverable. Instrument flight is a completely different discipline, without training it takes mere moments to become disoriented and lose control. If you do ever get into ...


14

The memory aid is PARE: POWER to idle AILERONS neutral RUDDER on the floor opposite the direction of spin ELEVATOR nose-down to break the stall You will want to read the full explanation in the Pilots Operating Handbook or POH for an understanding of the steps and why you need to take them. Commit the sequence above to memory and better yet get spin ...


13

In order for a spin to develop, you need two things from the airplane: it must be stalled it must be yawing. Since the airplane is not yawing while in a slip (it is actually flying straight ahead, although uncoordinated), the airplane simply won't spin. Instead, when the stall occurs the higher wing (which has the higher angle of attack) will stall ...


12

CFI candidates receive a spin training endorsement with no expiration date. According to AC 61-65E (the endorsement appendix), it should look like this: 46. Spin training: section 61.183(i)(1). I certify that (First name, MI, Last name) has received the required training of section 61.183(i). I have determined that he/she is competent in ...


12

When inverted, cut power. As speed bleeds off, gradually move stick forward keep your flight level, the nose will come up quite a bit over the horizon. It is important not to start sinking here as that will prevent the speed coming down low enough. When the stick hits the forward stop, kick in full rudder either way. Enjoy!


12

Does normal laws apply when the aircraft nose is vertically down? Yes, always. Physics doesn't care much about the aircraft's attitude and cannot be switched into different modes. While the nose points straight down, a stall is hard to achieve since no lift is needed - the weight is balanced by drag and inertia. However, when you pull abruptly and start to ...


12

Yes, both are stalled. I guess a nit-pick is on "what is stalled"? I adopt that you are at or beyond the point that an increase in AOA results in an increase in lift (critical AOA). That's the top of the blue curve in the plot below. Also, a stalled wing does not mean every point on the wing has unattached flow. It means the wing is operating at an AOA ...


11

How to stabilize a spinning aircraft Stabilizing a spinning aircraft is fairly easy. If the center of gravity is not too far forward, the rudder is deflected in spin direction and the elevator fully up (adjusting the horizontal tail trim helps, too), the spin will continue until the aircraft hits the ground. In some cases, the spin might oscillate between ...


11

The altimeter works by measurements of the pressure in undisturbed air, also called static pressure. A static port is placed, usually on the side of the hull, perpendicular to the airflow. During a spin, the airflow will not flow evenly past the static port, but will occasionally flow directly onto the static port. This will cause a rise in measured ...


11

No, one wing has at least partially attached flow. How else would there be a rolling and yawing moment which keeps the spin movement alive? During a spin the aircraft experiences a linear variation in angle of attack over span. The pitch attitude is between 40° and 60° nose-down, and the local angle of attack is 90° minus the pitch angle, which is between ...


10

The key to recovering from a flat spin is partly in the aircraft's design (aerobatic aircraft are built to handle "flatter" spins than normal aircraft and recover more readily), partly in the loading (specifically the location of the center of gravity), and partly in how "flat" the spin actually is. There is going to be a point for any aircraft where you ...


10

Generally, an airplane being operated within its published limits won't be able to get into a truly unrecoverable situation. (I'm specifically excluding the case where a recovery is theoretically possible, but you don't have enough altitude to execute the procedure before you hit something -- presumably you're already aware that you have less margin for ...


9

The Beggs/Mueller technique is: engine idle let go of the stick push rudder against spin direction This was developed for pilots of the Pitts Special biplane and will work well with naturally stable, powered aircraft. With gliders (where it strictly doesn't apply) it will be less effective, but still work in most cases. The better way is to combine both, ...


9

From the fine folks over at EAA, the Beggs/Mueller technique (also sometimes called the "hands-off" spin recovery technique) is: Power – Off. (presumably they mean "to idle", and not "stop the engine") Remove your hand from the stick. Apply full opposite rudder until rotation stops. Neutralize rudder and recover to level flight. So essentially the same ...


9

The vertical tail of the Tiger Moth is located a bit aft of the horizontal tail due to its sweep, such that the vertical will be in the wake of the root of the horizontal in a typical spin attitude (around 45° angle of attack). I would strongly recommend to fit the aluminium anti-spin strakes - those pilots who had no problem without them flew the Moth at a ...


9

When I used to teach my IFR students, they usually spent only the first couple of hours with all of their instruments. I put them in all sorts of unusual attitudes and let them recover under the hood, and with "failed" instruments. And I sometimes included spins with the students I thought could handle it. That was what my instructor did to me, and I guess I ...


9

Yes, what you describe is perfectly possible. A stall in banked flight can result in a spin, given you fly the "right" plane. My first flight in an ASW-20C was late in the afternoon, when most thermals had died down. I got a winch launch to maybe 350 m (the ASW-20 is rather poor in winch launches) and tried to find an updraft. In maybe 270 m I found one, ...


8

As DeltaLima said, it is kind of hard answering your question. After looking at the question he linked you might have found the answer already. Let me try to answer your specific question though: Assuming an airliner, let's say the A320, for some reason got into a spin, can it be recovered? The general answer would be yes! Here are some things to ...


8

I have recovered from a flat spin doing upset training in a Extra300L. Here's the video (you'll notice a secondary stall at 0:33 because I pulled too hard in the dive). It's interesting to note how one enters such a spin: first you enter a regular spin, and let it develop fully, then you do everything wrong: add full power, pull back on the sick, and ...


8

Sometimes a minimum density is needed to increase aerodynamic damping enough so ending the spin becomes possible. However, then there is not a fixed altitude loss to stop a spin but a fixed density altitude at which spin recovery becomes possible. I haven't spun a Mustang myself, so this is just my 2 cents to explain what might have prompted this opinion. ...


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