14

The clearance comes with the catch that you need to maintain the minimum visibility requirements and sky conditions, if you're not able to, you have no clearance, it's pretty much as simple as that. Either you need to navigate in such a way that you avoid the weather (which might require you to leave the airspace) or you can do one of two things Request an ...


13

You are confusing VFR, VMC, IFR and IMC. Let’s briefly define the terms before I attempt to answer your question: VFR – Visual Flight Rules. The pilot navigates at will, but must comply with cloud clearance and airspace requirements. VMC – Visual Meteorological Conditions. The weather is good enough to operate under VFR. IFR – Instrument Flight Rules. ...


10

Special VFR is used to leave or enter a control zone coming from or continuing the flight in airspace G (Golf), when the weather minima for VFR flight are not met within the control zone, but would be met in airspace G. Example: Airspace G (Golf) requires a visibility of 1.5km and aircraft need to remain clear of clouds. Airspace D (Delta) requires a ...


10

A Special VFR (SVFR) clearance may be issued to a pilot when: The weather is below VFR weather minimums, as reported at the intended airport The pilot is able to remain clear of clouds The pilot has at least one mile flight visibility (other than helicopters) at all times The pilot is operating (or wants to operate) within the lateral boundaries of the ...


8

From my experience in the US at the facilities I've worked, and the discussions I've had with other controllers, it depends heavily on the area's weather patterns. The facilities I've worked, it's been usually a tool, when people are trying to get in right before the weather hits, or they're seeing good improvement in neighboring airports and at the main one,...


6

In order to fly an SVFR clearance, the pilot and planned flight must meet several criteria. The AIM 4-4-6 as well as 14 CFR 91.157 spell out the basic requirements: You must have at least a private pilot certificate to obtain an SVFR clearance during daylight hours as well as an instrument rating to obtain an SVFR clearance at night. Student pilots are ...


5

Marginal VFR Straight out of the Aviation Weather Services advisory circular (AC 00-45G with changes 1 and 2): Marginal Visual Flight Rules (MVFR) indicated on the Weather Depiction Chart represents ceiling 1,000 to 3,000 feet and/or visibility 3 to 5 statute miles and VFR operations can take place. MVFR areas are outlined with a solid line, but ...


4

In Europe, a SVFR clearance may be given when meteorological conditions are below VFR within the control zone of the airport (ceiling below 1,500ft AGL and visibility less than 5km). The clearance can only be given when the aircraft can stay clear of clouds, see the ground and with a minimum surface visibility of 1.5km. In other words, if the visibility is ...


4

I've done it once, or maybe twice in 1200 hours of flying. The first time was when I was stuck at an airport in the LA basin which was below standard VFR minimums due to how thick the smog was. I filed SVFR to take off, and by 5000 feet I was above the smog layer and it was blue skies the rest of the way home.


4

If the pilot is on an SVFR clearance, the weather inside the surface area deteriorates below 1 mile visibility, and the pilot has the airport in sight, he can inform the controller that he has the field in sight and will be cleared to land. The pilot is responsible for continuing to the airport or exiting the surface area in order to remain visual. NOTE− ...


3

Copters fly SVFR more often than fixed-wing for a number of reasons: SVFR minimums are lower (see 91.157), can be done at night, and are not subject to the "NO SVFR" of Part 91 Appendix D Section 3 that prohibits SVFR at large Class B airports. Also, Copter instrument approaches can terminate at the MAP with an SVFR clearance to the airport. Such ...


2

There are rules. Without going into too much detail... As you probably know, IFR flight requires the pilot to file and receive clearance for their flight plan. If you are already airborne, you are required to stay clear of clouds and have 3 mile visibility (1 mile for SVFR) until you receive clearance for an IFR flight plan. That flight plan is going to ...


2

The only flight rule that will completely eliminate human error is to ban people from flying planes or programming UAVs. More regulations won't solve this. Aviation is already strictly regulated. As for why the pilot did not climb, well, you will have to ask him. Keep in mind that a mechanical failure could be to blame. We just don't know. Answer to ...


2

Without going into the definitions of IFR, VFR, IMC, VMC, which has been so well covered... Pilots CAN and DO fly VFR into IMC all the time. The NTSB actually has statistics on this occurrence. They usually are alerted to it by the big crashy noise the plane makes. The reason responsible pilots can and don’t fly VFR into IMC is that it is neither safe nor ...


2

Visual Flight Rules (VFR) and Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) are, as the names imply, two sets of rules that govern how a pilot flies. Assuming you are in controlled airspace, ATC will know which rules you are using, and if you want/need to switch, you must coordinate with them because it affects the services they provide (or don't provide) to you and ...


2

With these 21 airports, the airspace definitions are written so that the E4 "extensions" change to E2 and become part of a larger E2 "surface area" - which also includes the airspace that was Class D during the daytime -- when the tower closes for the night. The page number references are for the FAA's "Airspace Designations and Reporting Points" document, ...


2

It's not possible to get IR for any of those. I think EASA now has flying in clouds rating for gliders. For night flying you will need a glider that is certified to do that. I don't know any manufacturers of night gliders. Blaniks had an option to fly at night but most of them cannot fly now at all. SVFR may be possible in theory but it will be crazy. Maybe ...


1

You can not fly an ultralight there without prior authorization if I am reading 103.17 correctly. The way that I am reading this, it seems that you may not be in controlled airspace around an airport without prior authorization, period. And, above 18000 is a no-go as well. The highest concentration of aircraft traffic is at airports, Navaids like VORs, ...


1

Well the flight in question was operating under VFR nor had the pilot filed an IFR flight plan. The flight in question had an off airport destination which would have only allowed for a descent and landing under VFR operations. Could the pilot have filed an IFR or composite IFR/VFR flight plan? It’s possible. But the descent and landing would have had to ...


1

Yes there is. Note the range of comments below obtained from questions posed by telephone to various ARTC Center staffers-- in most cases, the "Watch Officer" on duty, or else an "Airspace Specialist"-- (The summaries below are based on written notes and are not verbatim transcriptions. The airspace descriptions are not from the staffers but rather are ...


1

No they do not. In researching the answer to this related question, I spoke to 7 different ARTCC or Approach Control staffers, each from a different facility. All but one told me that whether a given piece of airspace was E2 or E4 made no difference to them at all. "It's all Echo to us", one said. The remaining staffer said he wasn't sure what was the ...


1

The ATC Orders 7-5-1(a)(4) say: a. SVFR operations in weather conditions less than basic VFR minima are authorized: [...] Only within the lateral boundaries of Class B, Class C, Class D, or Class E surface areas, below 10,000 feet MSL. Only when requested by the pilot. On the basis of weather conditions reported at the airport of ...


1

The below was posted before the OP clarified in his question that he was interested in FAA-based data and anwers. I am not aware of any statistical data, but I can answer the second question in your text. Remember that SVFR is not only about visibility, but also about staying clear of clouds. Airspace D in Germany requires cloud distances of 1.000ft ...


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