26

Even if ATC can't legally give you permission to enter prohibited airspace (they sometimes can for restricted airspace by the way), if you declare an emergency they will still coordinate with the controlling agency which will help to keep you safe. Squawk 7700, fly as high as possible, turn on all your lights, broadcast your intentions on 121.5 if you ...


22

Assuming your question is for the US airspace. Short answer: When the activation periods cannot be totally anticipated, the description of the area must reference the possibility of activation announced by NOTAM. The NOTAM notice is normally not shorter than 4 hours before the activation. While IFR flights will be prevented by ATC to enter or transit an ...


14

Aviate, Navigate, Communicate. In that order. First, solve the in-flight emergency. If that truly means penetrating prohibited or restricted airspace, do it. Second, navigate to exit the prohibited or restricted airspace as soon as possible. Third, Communicate to ATC what you are doing and why. Follow instructions given if they don't conflict with ...


11

To add a little to @abelenky's answer, you'll notice that each area has a identifier in it: SBR-522, SBP-505 etc. Those identifiers are made up of the ICAO country prefix, the airspace type, and a unique code. The airspace type can be Prohibited (P), Restricted (R) or Danger (D). Since SB is the ICAO code for Brazil, SBR-522 is Brazil Restricted area #522; ...


9

This is indeed a designated air refueling track used by military tanker aircraft (all AR-nnn SUA areas are, and they all share that same general racetrack shape). The reason why it isn't on a sectional is because it's simply not a concern to anyone who isn't in a high-performance, high-altitude airplane -- air refueling (of fixed-wing birds at least) ...


8

According to this report on air crashes AR-633 (I assume the same as AR-633A now) The cities of Oak Ridge, Knoxville, and Rockwood lie beneath AR-633, a volume of airspace used by the 134th Tennessee Air National Guard Air Refueling Group for practicing air refueling (Sect. 2.2). Although under military jurisdiction, this designated airspace is ...


7

It is extremely rare for an R-zone to be able to be activated by NOTAM with less than four hours' notice. Most R-zones in the U.S. are on a regular schedule printed on sectionals, with a few activated by NOTAM by the using agency with at least four hours' notice, and sometimes several days' notice is required by law for a few zones created along well-...


6

For SUA NOTAMs, you can find it via sua.faa.gov, in either map or text format. If an SUA on a chart has defined hours, stick to those. Example after downloading the text data: Map example (layer control is useful): Color indicates if active or scheduled and how far in the future.


5

Blasting areas are not subject to particular regulation, they can be depicted on charts and announced by NOTAMs. It's pilot responsibility to remain clear of these areas: Source: AIP Canada Known permanent blasting activities can be depicted on VFR charts and announced by NOTAM until charts can be updated. From AIP Canada: The “VFR Chart Updating ...


4

To add to the informative answers already here, this chart excerpt is from SkyVector.com and depicts a World VFR chart of this area in south-eastern Brazil. Where available, SkyVector uses FAA sectional charts to stitch together their World VFR product. Where those are unavailable, my understanding is that SkyVector uses other available data to create their ...


4

See Page #10 of this document, which indicates that the markings show "Prohibited, Restricted and Warning Areas"


4

According to the sectional chart, Class D airspace does not extend into the restricted area. SkyVector KINS Sectional Chart The restricted airspace starts at the surface to an unlimited altitude. According the JO 7400_11A.pdf, Class D does not enter the restricted area. Class E airspace is the same.


3

Yes you can. The MOA floor, 10000ft in this case, is the lower limit of any restrictions a MOA imposes. Otherwise there would be no point in assigning a floor to MOA (or any other airspace for that matter) See FAA AIM Section 4. Special Use Airspace


2

Flexible Use of Airspace is a concept rather than a part of airspace (which SUA is), where the whole airspace is used for both restricted and unrestricted (civil) activities. According to FAA: • The FAA version of Flexible Use of Airspace (FUA) is called “Joint Use Airspace” • Although not defined as such, the domestic United States could be labeled ...


2

In many cases, there are controllers dedicated to providing ATC services to the aircraft that are USING the SUA. Callsigns such as "Nellis Range" or "Eglin Mission" are used for the controllers working with aircraft within the SUA, be it MOA or Restricted or Warning areas or whatever. What looks like one big chunk of airspace on the chart may likely be ...


1

It varies for the different types of SUA's. They include: restricted airspace, prohibited airspace, military operations areas (MOA), warning areas, alert areas, temporary flight restriction (TFR), national security areas, and controlled firing areas. For the U.S., if the SUA extends above FL180, and the pilot will be permitted to cross said SUA, then IFR ...


1

You need to look this up in the Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP) for each individual country. Special Use Airspaces are contained in section ENR 5 of an AIP. Many AIP's are available online. You can find a comprehensive list here: https://www.eurocontrol.int/articles/ais-online Simply select a country, open their AIP, and navigate to the ENR 5 ...


1

EU: aixm.aero France: sia.aviation-civile.gouv.fr Upper space RTBA map (military, low altitude) USA: sua.faa.gov AIXM Data: nfdc.faa.gov Diverse locations: soaringweb.org This is a community wiki, just add to it.


1

SAA is a project being undertaken to unify how SUA's (and ATCAA's) are defined, managed, and shared. [SAA will] define SUAs and ATCAAs in a consistent manner using an editing tool Use a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) to distribute that data to interested users Manage the schedule and status of those airspaces through a SOA. SAA is part of ...


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