7

Given the hours required for the ATP, the chance of doing that rating alone in under a year seems pretty remote. Getting the private and commercial certificates done inside of a year is entirely possible, although not cheap. The writtens for the ATP are no big deal, but the hours simply will take a lot of time, as well as the right employment opportunity, ...


6

It is the Aerodrome Reference Point, ARP. As per ICAO annex 14 vol 1, chapter 2.2: 2.2 Aerodrome reference point 2.2.1 An aerodrome reference point shall be established for an aerodrome. 2.2.2 The aerodrome reference point shall be located near the initial or planned geometric centre of the aerodrome and shall normally remain where first ...


5

For SA to Namibia: Factors to consider Buying all the appropriate charts. Clouds: if you can't maintain the required separation, you need to switch to IFR, which means the plane needs to be IFR-equipped, and for you to be IFR rated. Sources: Namibia AIP GEN 3.2 and ENR 1.2 En route airway paths All airways from SA to Namibia are Class A, so VFR is not ...


3

South Africa is quite capable of designing and manufacturing turbojet and turbofan engines from scratch. They have been doing so since the 1990's and the only reason they stopped was due to the upheaval after the end of the apartheid regime. They restarted the work in 2014, so who knows how far they've come since then.


3

I have never been given a QFE to conduct an instrument approach in S.A. It does happen in some countries but then everyone has to use it. If you look on an approach chart you will see the vertical profile is given in terms of height above sea level so you wouldn't be able to conduct the approach with QFE set. Edit: The SACAA charts do show height of the ...


3

Do you mean frozen ATPL? This can be easily done in 3 months if you have unlimited money and normal intellectual qualities.


2

In the absence of a specific note on the TETAN SID chart limiting this procedure to multi-engine airplanes, I think the marked answer of #1 is incorrect. I think number #3 is correct. If you can't meet the climb gradient restriction you should not take off (single-engine or multi-engine). The 6.2% climb gradient restriction shown on the bottom of the SID ...


2

It's because 2500 feet is the minimum altitude prior to starting the inbound descent at 8 DME and you can descend to that altitude pretty much anywhere between ABV and 8 DME inbound, within the protected airspace of the procedure turn. When you started the outbound leg at 3000, you can pretty much descend to 2500 sooner or later, as long as you don't ...


2

You need to file a flight plan for each flight in Namibia, submit a clearance/permit request for your intended route (whole trip) with the Namibian CAA, the clearance number is to be added to your flight plan under item 18, other info, and you need to enter the country via port of entry airports, most practically via Upington to Keetmanshoop. I have just ...


1

It is a symbol for a referenced location as defined in the “Legend” that explains what each symbol means. That legend, which must accompany a map for it to be useful, is usually found within the first few pages of the directory of airports or at the very end of the book. I’ve seen that symbol used on some non-government map providers as the Airport ...


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