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16

Both are in taxiing SOP. The reason is in case the spoilers were accidentally left extended on the flight before (or during a maintenance check before the flight by the line engineers). If that's the case, then pressing MAX while taxiing before checking the flight controls (spoilers included) will engage the full RTO brakes and surprise the crew, injure a ...


16

Your question mentions the 737 or similar. If you want answers limited to 2-engine jets, let me know and I'll remove this answer as it is for the 747-100 or -200. Whether to restart or not depends on the nature of the failure. If there appears to be no problem to do otherwise, a restart would be in order. The checklist for an inflight start from the last ...


11

According to item 6-14 in the 737NG Abnormal Procedures Handbook, you're basically supposed to make sure that the engine is shut down completely and then divert to the nearest suitable airport. From The 737NG Abnormal Procedures Handbook ENGINE FAILURE/SHUTDOWN Condition: Loss of all thrust on an engine accompanied by illumination of the ENG FAIL ...


9

Switching off the battery too soon interrupts the auto shutdown sequence. In that sequence is an automatic de-oil procedure that is carried out. A de-oil valve introduces air into the oil pump to break the suction (reduce the drag) for the next start. The air forces the oil back to the oil reservoir and out of the bearing chambers. If it doesn't the once ...


7

The procedure switches off the pumps, thereby resolving the low pressure. Low pressure means the pump is running but it is not pulling anything. Fuel pumps can't draw fuel if the amount is too low. Imagine pumping water out of a swimming pool by attaching the pump to a hose. There will be smalls amounts that the hose can't reach. That amount is called ...


5

Amber X's mean the FADEC is not yet energized. Once the X's disappear it means the FADEC is ready and can provide monitoring (even passive monitoring in a manual start). Without FADEC there is no means to start the engine, as the valves are also FADEC controlled. (A320 FADEC schematic.) FADEC is needed even for manual start.


5

You would want to start with flaps/slats. The landing gear slows the aircraft down like an airbrake, and you'll need a higher lift coefficient to retain enough lift. Slats are a safety feature that allow for a higher angle of attack for the main wing, flaps provide a higher $C_L$ by themselves. So you start with a higher $C_L$ and the safety of the slats, ...


4

As Ralgha stated, this kind of callout would be included in the SOP. A couple I found in searching were the NBAA (same in their helicopter procedures by the way) and Angel Flight NE, as well as some generic CRM guides. The FAA Instrument Procedures Handbook also mentions altitude callouts, suggesting something like "two to go" and "one to go" (in thousands). ...


4

As far as I know, there are no published FAA guidelines on it. An operator develops their SOP, and the FAA approves it, so whatever the SOP says is approved by the FAA. Ours is, "one thousand to go," by the pilot flying, and then, "nine thousand for ten thousand," responded by the pilot monitoring.


4

A higher configuration number indicates that the flaps/slats are extended by an higher amount. In turns this means that for the same angle of attack the wings will produce higher lift (and drag) in the higher configuration. You achieve take-off when the lift is at least equal to the weight of the aircraft, and with higher flap/slat deflection you will have ...


3

In order to take off and subsequently climb, the aircraft needs to create lift greater than weight. It does so by rotating. Image source Compare the lift of the plain airfoil with that of the airfoil with flaps: the green line produces a certain lift at a lower AoA than the blue line. It needs to rotate less in order to take off. The highest risk of ...


3

The answer very much depends on the operator and type of aircraft (or rather its manufacturer). First of all, overweight landing would normally be performed for the following scenarios: Medical emergency on board that requires prompt medical attention Any fire/smoke that cannot be extinguished/ventilated QRH dictating "Land at the nearest suitable airport" ...


2

ok two questios there really: entering vapp as speed constraint at the FAF. After the FAF you want to be flying a constant 3deg path (or whatever the approach gs is). Changing configurations and deploying flaps while on final will make the aeroplane baloon and deviate from that flightpath. To minimize those (uncorectable) deviations, the SOPs will call for ...


2

On the old system the switching between the normal braking using the green circuit to the alternate braking using the yellow circuit is done by an automatic switching valve pressure dependant (Automatic selector).The alternate system being very little used, it happened the valve did not switch from green to yellow when loosing the green circuit please ...


1

Catalytic oxidation of carbon occurs when a catalyst, such as an alkali metal(s), is present. When a catalyst is present, the temperature at which thermal oxidation occurs is lowered. Airplanes equipped with carbon brakes are susceptible to catalytic oxidation caused by exposure to alkali metal runway deicers. - Boeing Aero Magazine Brake ...


1

... if landing is performed without A/THR... Then theoretically you don't need the VAPP [setting] and should fly a bit faster, it's only a speed bug in this situation. ... without wind... Even if the METAR is reporting an average of 0 knots, there is always a breeze here and there. ... no margin against a stall... You have a 23% margin. VLS is 1.23 VS ...


1

this is speculation, but if you ask why we lower gear between F2 and F3, I think Koyovis is getting quite close to the potential answer: Each configuration has a reference speed: Green Dot, S speed, F speed. The biggest difference is between S and F ( ie after deploying flaps 2) , that is: this is where aicraft will decelerate the most from around the 180+ ...


1

All instrument approaches are not alike. The Flight Safety Foundation Approach-and-Landing Accident Reduction Tool Kit, Section 5.1 — Approach Hazards Overview points out Fifty-three percent of the accidents and incidents occurred during nonprecision instrument approaches or visual approaches (42 percent of the visual approaches were conducted ...


1

While I don't fly in a plane requiring more than one person, when there happens to be two pilots, such as one flying safety so the other can fly under the hood, I prefer the "1,000 feet remaining" or "1,000 remaining" call out. I don't really have some scientific reason for it, but it just seems more logical to me and easier to interpret.


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