12

Approaches into Schiphol are usually vectored by ATC during the day (see below for night operations). This means the controllers are giving instructions to pilots depending on the current traffic, which makes it hard to say when exactly planes will overfly Egmond aan Zee. If the Polderbaan (runway 18R/36L) is used for landing from the North (18R), planes ...


6

There are 3 STARs (Standard Terminal Arrival Routes) into JFK that cross over Long Island: PARCH 3 RNAV ARR: PAWLING 2 ARR: ROBER 2 ARR: (Jeppesen charts) None of these have particularly pronounced zigzag patterns, so what you describe is probably not coming from the waypoints of the arrival procedure. Looking at flightradar24.com, we can currently see ...


5

It would be nice if there were an authoritative, canonical, source for these sorts of waypoints, but sadly, I don't think one exists. I say that because I hear controllers sometimes using a different set of vowels or syllable emphasis "today" than they did "yesterday". If there were a single "right" way to verbalize CNERY or SCTRR, I'd expect ATC to have ...


4

During normal daytime operations aircraft are passing over the southern edge of Egmond aan Zee at 2000 ft (600m) altitude. They maintain 2000 ft until estabilshed on the ILS to runway 18R (or 18C). The aircraft come from the south (e.g. Portugal, Spain, France, Belgium) or west (UK, Ireland, Iceland, transatlantic) and descent to 2000 ft over the north sea. ...


3

If you look at the chart, you'll see that after takeoff you will arrive at JNC from either the east or the northeast. Transitions then proceed back in an easterly direction (045 to 113 degrees). With the possible exception of the Rwy 29 departure with the BRICK transition, the SID requires a course reversal at JNC. The charted hold provides a means and ...


3

Yes it is possible and it is mentioned in the accompanying CIFP Readme pdf. Specifically, it states that Procedure types that are not yet included in the CIFP: ILS CAT II, ILS CAT III, ILS PRM, Converging ILS and Visual procedures are not included in the CIFP. Not-In-CIFP Spreadsheet: ILS (Category 1 only), LOC, SDF, LDA, VOR, NDB, GPS, RNAV (GPS)...


3

If a word was used to choose a pronounceable 5-letter designator (name-code), it would not be documented. (There are many pronounceable name-codes that don't mean a thing – in both English and the local language.) ICAO Annex 11 (Air Traffic Services) Appendix 2 says: 4.2 In printed and coded communications, only the coded designator or the selected name-...


3

Altitude limits on these procedures have to take many different things into account, including obstacle clearance and communication, but also radar coverage, separation from other procedures and airspace, the overall profile of the procedure, noise abatement, and more. The at or above 2500 restriction on the DEEZZ is similarly included in the other SIDs at ...


2

1) Not to my knowledge, these are short-term deviations from plan that do not require an updated plan (similar to ATC offering direct routings - shortcuts). 2) Not sure. What qualifies as “often”? 3) Experience, local and airport procedure knowledge and a weather (wind!) forecast go great lengths in predicting departure runways and routings.


2

Some SIDs/STARs have a restriction to only turbojet or turboprop aircraft and say piston aircraft (what I suspect you meant by "GA") should use another SID/STAR, or they may have different altitude or speed restrictions (or "expect"s) for different types. Some, like the one shown above, don't say anything about aircraft performance; this probably means that ...


1

When it comes to flight planning, dispatchers are the best in the business. That is literally what they are payed to do. However, they, for obvious reasons, don't always guess the correct runway. Luckily, it doesn't really matter. As long as the aircraft has the performance to take off from the assigned runway (which would be calculated in the FMC or EFB) ...


1

There is no single "correct" pronunciation for fix/waypoint names. The only rule is that the pronunciations must be unambiguous with respect to all other nearby names. For CNERY, jf one controller says "Scenery" and another says "Connery", and neither is ambiguous, then both are arguably correct. Heck, I'd even accept "Canary"; maybe the local fixes are ...


1

Because the navigational beacons and the indicator instruments in the cockpit are such that the system is less precise at longer distances. Second the plane must find the initial fix or intersection while flying blind under IMC before becoming aligned and so the area acts like a funnel. In some areas the terrain may limit the radio beacon signal so a wedge ...


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