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24

These are antennae for the IFF (Identification Friend or Foe) system. IFF is a system to help distinguish friendly aircraft from unfriendly ones. This particular antenna arrangement is used on only a couple of F-16 models. The first was the F-16 Air Defense Fighter (ADF) version. This model was converted from the F-16 Block 15 for use as a fighter ...


23

There are several reasons to have the pressure sensors in the front section of the fuselage. The further aft the more turbulent the airflow is and the thicker the boundary layer caused by the fuselage. This would cause strong fluctuations of the measured pressure and the reading could be inaccurate. Far forward the boundary layer is the thinnest because the ...


17

It's the infrared sensor for the Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS). From FedEx Newsroom June 23, 2008: FedEx Express is the first major commercial carrier in the airline industry to receive a Supplemental Type Certificate from the FAA for the advanced system, authorizing its installation in the company’s fleet of Boeing MD-10 freighters. The company’s ...


10

An INS gives your speed & orientation in space, but without reference to what the airmass that you're flying in is doing. The Pitot tube and AOA sensors give speed and pitch orientation in relation to the local airmass, only. An indicated airspeed of 60 knots, measured by the Pitot tube, may correspond to a stationary aircraft pointed into 60 knots of ...


7

The boundary layer grows in thickness as you move aft on a fuselage. It is thinnest near the nose. A pitot tube near the nose only has to protrude a small distance away from the fuselage skin in order to extend out of the boundary layer and into undisturbed air.


6

Also, to add to Wayne's answer, there are multiple antennas because the computer that processes the data received compares the phase of the signals received from each of them to calculate the direction the signal came from... Because they are separated from one another, any signal received from a point directly in front of them will be received at the same ...


4

Yes, such a system would be beneficial to pilots, ATC, and meteorologists. Pilots are very concerned with meteorological phenomena like icing and turbulence (for safety-of-flight reasons) and winds aloft (for fuel planning purposes). Pilot reports of weather conditions (PIREPs) may be delivered to ATC or Flight Service for local and long-range dissemination. ...


3

The question mentions Speed and Orientation which are broad terms that could include: Group1: (Air Data sensor + computation) IAS - Indicated Air Speed CAS - Calibrated Air Speed EAS - EquivalentAir Speed. TAS - True Air Speed AoA - Angle of Attack (HDG(M) - Magnetic Heading)^^ Group2a : (Inertial/Rate sensor + computation) GS - Ground Speed HDG(T) - ...


3

That's one of the two ice detectors manufactured by Collins. Below is not precisely the model used by A220, but serves to illustrate the general layout of the unit: Image ref: Collins From this Collins fact sheet, ice detectors use a magnetostrictive technology to drive the sensing probe to resonate at its natural frequency. As ice accretes on the ...


2

Regardless of the number of sensors, the pilot must have enough experience to tell what is going and just fly the plane. Checklists may help, but there may not be time. After the first 737 MAX crash, there was an Airworthiness Directive and a Notice to Airmen setting forth the way to deal with stabilizer runaway, whatever the cause, including MCAS. The 2nd ...


1

I want to understand what is the purpose of doing localization while an aircraft is flying? Knowing where you are means you won't get lost and arrive at your destination instead of literally anywhere else. What sensors are used by the instrument that does this localization of an aircraft? Are there more than one ways to do the localization? Can we do ...


1

I want to understand what is the purpose of doing localization while an aircraft is flying? Well, in general it would be nice to know where you currently are, wouldn't you agree? Even aircraft flying under VFR (Visual Flight Rules) should be able to determine their location, either by looking out of the window and identifying landmarks they know or by ...


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