72

It depends on the exact model. Bobby pins or any key that physically fits will get you into some, you'll need real picks for others, and some custom jobs may require a police snap gun or a locksmith's services. This doesn't correlate with aircraft price: the larger and more advanced, the less likely it is to have any locks at all. At the high end, jumbo jets ...


59

The reason is that there is no member of the general public in those areas with an ADS-B receiver sharing live data with the public tracking sites. Websites like Flight Radar 24 rely largely on volunteers installing ADS-B receivers and sharing their received data. They have a good coverage, but some areas are still not covered.


27

Generally, airlines are required to have content in their ops manual clearly stating who is entitled to flight deck access from the point the engines are started until shutdown. In some countries, such as the UK, airlines are required to limit access only to essential personnel, and foreign airlines must follow the rule while in UK airspace. I would find it ...


22

The only key lock you might encounter on a corporate jet will be a pin/tumbler lock securing the outside operating handle of the main entry door. You won't find anything exotic unless the owner has gone out of his way to install something. Just about all pin tumber and disc detainer locks can be picked fairly easily with some skill and practice and the ...


8

Another possible way in would be through the emergency exits. Emergency exits are designed to allow them to be opened from the inside or the outside in case rescue is needed. Many planes that I fly have a pin that is engaged inside the cabin that is to be used when the jet is parked and removed for flight. In almost every case, the pin is virtually never ...


5

The main reason why checked luggage is treated differently is that you cannot access it during the flight, therefore eliminating some of the security concerns (like e.g. a knife in checked baggage is not a risk). When your carry-on bag is hand-searched, it is most likely because something could not be seen properly or looked suspicious on the X-ray. The ...


4

You did not specify a country for your domestic flight, but in general: Assuming you do not intend to power it on and use it during the flight, it should not be a problem. Esoteric and unusual electronics may get a bit more screening by security services, but should not be explicitly banned. I recommend allowing extra time for security screening, and it ...


3

The entire point of an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) is to notify pilots that the relevant defense forces require identifying all aircraft to determine whether they are a threat. They much prefer to do this via you filing the appropriate flight plan and talking to ATC/FIS. If you don't do that, you should expect to be intercepted by said defense ...


1

Here's a very much non-aviation-approved solution which may be attractive in that it allows a McGyverish solution to an aircraft with a more than usually resistant lock design. If "safely flyable" rather than "certified flyable" is acceptable, then cutting any suitable window along a line say 10mm+ from the edge and gaining access via the hole would in ...


1

Us mere mortals are not entitled to know of the proceedings taking place behind the thick rubber curtains of the baggage conveyor belt, for reasons too obvious to list here. However, this Youtube video does show us the very infallible super-hi-tech scanners your question is referring to. At least in Atlanta, it seems obvious every checked in luggage goes ...


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