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38

I'm not sure that comparing car seatbelts to airplane seatbelts is that useful here. The acceleration involved in a car crash at highway speeds are much greater than even the acceleration, mostly vertical, involved in even severe turbulence. For example, after a 2015 severe turbulence encounter, investigators determined: "In the first event, the peak ...


23

As we have seen in a previous question, the A220 is a re-branded Bombardier CSeries. The CSeries started flying in 2013. At the time Bombardier's other commercial jet was the CRJ, that started flying in 1999, 14 years prior. CRJs do have a yoke: (wikimedia.org) If you look closely, you'll notice that the seats look identical, indicating that Bombardier ...


18

The tandem arrangement (one behind the other) is used on aircraft that have single seat variants. The F-15, F-16, and F/A-18 are all primarily single seat aircraft. It's much easier to stretch the nose out a bit to add a second position than to make it wider. This arrangement is also more aerodynamic, requiring less frontal area. Fighter aircraft designed ...


16

For a proper answer we first need to define what "safe enough" is. If you want a significant reduction in risk over current standards, improving the restraint will not be enough. Your observation is absolutely correct: The lap belt is the minimum the airlines get away with, and you would be much better protected in some kinds of accident by a proper 5-point ...


16

(Source) Your Asiana A350 ride. On the same plane the economy seats don't have that shoulder strap. It's not new either. There are various reasons: Most business class seats are not forward facing. For your ride it's a slight angle but it's there. It allows* reclining the seat during taxi, takeoff, and landing. [Qantas will] offer the world’s first ...


15

Apparently, it can be done, atleast in some aircraft; even in those cases, the armrests are locked, unless one knows the location of the release button. As for why, it seems that there is a possibility that the upright armrests can be an obstacle (for people in the next seat row) and FAA expects the cabin crew to ensure that the armrests are in forward ...


12

Are the current seat belts used in commercial airlines safe enough? Not really, the current seat belt standard is aimed mostly to protect against aircraft movements encountered in flight, not during impact which are very uncommon, contrary to automotive industry. Current FAA regulations impose the seat and seat restraints to protect from 16g deceleration ...


12

That depends on the air carrier and the regulatory body they're certified by. Finland is part of the EU so I'm assuming that Finnair's certificate is under EASA aviation safety regs. Specifically, a quick Google search finds: CAT.OP.MPA.165 Passenger seating: The operator shall establish procedures to ensure that passengers are seated where, in the ...


12

Yeah, even in the strongest wind gust longitudinal acceleration or deceleration is not a problem; we are talking only fraction of a G. During cruise flight sudden turbulence causes most damage and there the vertical component is critical. Even then the experienced vertical accelerations are negligible when compared to car accidents. They are enough to toss ...


11

I'll have a go at this, but this answer applies only to the US. First, is it legal? As far as I can see, yes. There are various regulations (e.g. 14 CFR 121.317) about specific items that passengers have to be briefed on and comply with instructions on. They include smoking, seatbelts, emergency exits, screens and tables etc. But there's no explicit mention ...


9

The elasticity of the fuselage does indeed dampen the load factors from gusts somewhat. Therefore, gust-induced accelerations are a little higher over the wing than in the forward or rear fuselage. If the gust causes a pitching motion, this creates its own accelerations which adds to the bumps from the vertical accelerations. Elevator deflections cause ...


9

The main reason for having tandem seating in fighter aircrafts is that it offers better performance compared to the side by side version. This is why most of the high performance fighters have tandem seating arrangement. "Sukhoi Su-30LL demonstrator flying along the runway at Zhangjiajie Hehua Airport less than 1 metre off the ground"by Xu Zheng - http://...


9

The FAA provides some useful links in their cabin safety index document here. It seems according to this document, as well as this bulletin arm resets (in general) may actually provide a bigger safety risk when lifted and that they should be placed in the down position for takeoff and landing for emergency reasons: 3-3484 PROTRUDING PASSENGER SEAT ...


8

According to this document published by the FAA (about smaller GA planes but the topic is applicable) Tests have shown that slack in the restraint system should be minimal. In an impact, your body keeps moving until the slack is taken out of the restraint, but then must be abruptly stopped to “catch up” with the airplane. The restraint should be ...


8

I would imagine this is related to having a common factor across all fleet types, eg I would imagine that Economy class across all aircraft types, both Narrow and Widebody, start at 31. Similarly if you booked an 'A' or 'K' seat you would be assured of a window, or a 'C' / 'D' seat would always be an aisle in the window block. HJK is not consecutive ...


8

If it was a season 5 episode, it was most likely N7264U, a 727-200:1 Season Five Boeing 727-222 Ep. 5.25 Registration N7264U, c/n 21411/1346 built in 1978 for United. Based at Ontario International Airport (ONT/KONT) in California, where this was most likely filmed. The 727's three Pratt & Whitney JT8D engines are all mounted on/in its ...


7

Legally, you would need to find a seat that passed the FAA's 16 G "side facing" requirements. The AC that covers the 16G rule has some text that may be of interest on this matter. The FAA admits that its an ongoing area of research and that currently special tests need to be undertaken to certify one. (bolded for emphasis) d. Side-facing Seats. (1)...


7

If you're talking about one of the jumpseats in the flight deck (as opposed to the ones FAs use in the passenger cabin,) then, no, it's definitely not allowed during flight, at least not in the U.S. or E.U. It may be allowed elsewhere, though. The United States Relevant regulations for the U.S.: 14 CFR 121.547 for domestic air carriers and 14 CFR 129.28 ...


7

Options would be to either move the passenger to another seat & placard that seat as unusable, or go back to the gate and have maintenance fix what's broken. In the former case, the seat would most likely be fixed by a mechanic at the next station. The seatbelts used in the F/A demos are seatbelt extensions, which still need the installed seatbelt ...


7

Essentially this has been explained to me as "you're a trip hazard." ' Additionally, inferences that if power/lights go off, you'll be stepped on and trip people, particularly people in your row (don't know how this applies so much if you're a couple/by yourself), and in the way in the necessity of evacuation, or in the case of a flight attendant needing to ...


7

It's always a regulation. If there is any safety equipment on an aircraft, a reg put it there. In this case it is FAR 25.562 Amendment 25-64, the 16g seat impact requirement. This reg included a "head strike envelope" provision that manufacturers say is so complex that it was impossible to satisfy. This was with a lap belt only. The FAA "relented" by ...


7

Its a matter of legal requirement (under the FAA, and I presume the EASA has a similar reg). Strictly speaking its really more important that the passenger returns to a seat. Generally you are asked to return to your seat as it can be assured its empty and available for you. Under FAA regulations you are required to be wearing a seatbelt for landing and thus ...


7

I can't speak to all aircraft, but on the 727-100 and 747-100/200 aircraft I flew, the seat cutout accommodated the strap on 5-point seat belt systems that went down between your legs. See https://pitstopusa.com/c-134853-safety-equipment-seat-belts-harnesses-cam-lock-restraint-systems-5-point-camlock-restraints.html. I don't recall for certain whether the ...


6

Those seats aren't smaller! TWA had fold over seatbacks, resulting in a nice table for the seat next to you if the flights weren't full. They are the exact same size as the other seats. Also, those things down the centerlines between the seats were coat closets. Later replaced by a full width seat when they went from 2-4-2 to 2-5-2 in their last ...


5

One other point not mentioned here is that the F-111 was designed during the time frame that the Air Force and its contractors were experimenting with the lifting body principle. At that time, a lot of work was going into widening the fuselage and making it act like a wing. The main benefit the Air Force was looking for was that additional lift equals ...


5

See the FAA FAR Here for the full regulations but it says: (b) Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section, each person on board an airplane operated under this part shall occupy an approved seat or berth with a separate safety belt properly secured about him or her during movement on the surface, takeoff, and landing. the ...


5

I believe the apparent lack of space or the discomfort is a red-herring. That's simply not the case. The passengers don't seem to be tighter packed than in a Ryanair flight actually. And I also don't believe that the sidewards configuration is motivated by this rationale. The aircraft is a Boeing C-17. It does not have a civilian version, so direct ...


5

I would postulate (but have no firm evidence to prove the point) that the brace position is actually safer than a 5-point harness would be for passengers in an aircraft accident. The 5-point harness would hold your body snugly against the seat, but leave your head bobbing around as a 5-pound ball on a weak tether (your neck). The same issue would happen to ...


5

The short answer, Your couch is made for you to fall asleep on, watch football from, and generally be of any non determinant shape since no couch (as far as I know) carries a type certificate. Aircraft seats are designed to fit as many passengers as is legally allowed and practically possible while still passing the 16G tests the FAA imposes. The 16G ...


5

Check out this related question And this forum topic. They help prevent wear and tear on the seat fabric underneath and are fairly easy to replace. In a lot of GA planes they are installed to hide old tired seats underneath. But mostly they are just really really comfortable. They breathe in warm weather and help insulate in cold. All around a good fabric ...


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