We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
53

In the US they do very similar theater when a pilot needs to relieve himself. There is an announcement that nobody is allowed to come forward, and grim looking flight attendants are blocking the aisles with coffee trolleys. The details surely depend on the airline. Each of these procedures goes back to some bad incident. The cockpit doors are locked since 9/...


38

I'm not sure that comparing car seatbelts to airplane seatbelts is that useful here. The acceleration involved in a car crash at highway speeds are much greater than even the acceleration, mostly vertical, involved in even severe turbulence. For example, after a 2015 severe turbulence encounter, investigators determined: "In the first event, the peak ...


25

This is standard procedure when a pilot needs to use the lavatory (bathroom). The area near the front lavatory is blocked off by cabin crew, so you cannot get into this area. The pilot unlocks the cockpit door, steps out, and goes into the lav. a cabin crew member takes his place, and the cockpit door is closed. reverse steps 1-3. Why step 1? To ...


17

The flight was a "doors-off" photographic "experience" conducted by a company called FlyNYON, as seen in this video. The doors of the helicopter are either removed completely or latched in the open position, and the passengers are secured with tethered harnesses which allow them to sit or stand in the open doorway whilst in flight. Unfortunately, the ...


13

"between the pilots" depends on the aircraft. On larger commercial aircraft and even some fairly small planes the area between the seats is occupied by the FMS and throttle units and there really isn't anywhere to put a cooler as seen here: (source) A lot of aircraft (bigger than the PC-12 mentioned) have jump seats in the cockpit. If unoccupied these ...


12

Yeah, even in the strongest wind gust longitudinal acceleration or deceleration is not a problem; we are talking only fraction of a G. During cruise flight sudden turbulence causes most damage and there the vertical component is critical. Even then the experienced vertical accelerations are negligible when compared to car accidents. They are enough to toss ...


7

He has simply picked up the end in his right hand which belongs to the belt of the person sitting on his right. If you have two people sitting side by side with lap belts then there will be two belts in between them eg F-(passengerA)-M-F-(passengerB)-M As mentioned in the comments there is a good chance that he is siting on his own male-ended belt.


5

Airlines are free to add any safety procedures they deem necessary for safety-of-flight situations. If that is what they did, it's likely standard procedure for that airline.


5

A couple of years ago, I witnessed the same 'procedure' but without as much of the 'theater': During a very smooth flight, the 'fasten seatbelts' lights went on, people got to their seats, and a couple of minutes later, while I was still wondering why we should secure ourselves in the seats mid-flight in perfect weather conditions, the cockpit door opened ...


4

No, there's no regulation on the color; the restraints just have to allow the crew to perform all their duties. The old 23.785 regulation said: (e) The restraint system for each crewmember must allow the crewmember, when seated with the safety belt and shoulder harness fastened, to perform all functions necessary for flight operations. The new 23.2535 ...


4

You essentially have two questions, which I will answer in turn: When may commerical pilots release their shoulder harnesses when operating under commercial operations rules such as §121 When do such pilots actually release their harnesses in practice Regarding your first question: 14 CFR 91.105 does generally apply to commercial operators and air ...


2

Crews usually work together for several days as a unit, and the CA and FO usually alternate flying each leg. This allows each to stay current and for the FO's skills to grow through critique by the CA and by observing the CA, depending on whose leg it is. In the event of emergency, though, the CA will usually take over. Part of the reason the FO is there is ...


2

Keeping you in your seat is not only for your benefit. If the plane experiences sudden vertical motion (turbulence / air pockets etc) then people bouncing all around the cabin would be a touch messier than people "flailing" (lol) in their own seats. I've seen this, during air pockets over Seoul. Most passengers were buckled in, but one or two passengers ...


2

I reckon turbulence (i.e. vertical acceleration, pitch and roll) is the issue based on experience in the cheap seats and reports of in-flight injuries. It's not 100% predictable, and if you're fully reclined or asleep (as you've noted) it takes time to react so some protection is probably a good idea. Loosely fastening the seatbelt keeps the passenger from ...


2

Company-specific as far as I know. My operation uses flaps retracted for releasing the shoulder harness, and the descent checklist for putting them back on, but I doubt that there is a requirement to pick either of those exact points. Above/below 10,000' would probably work equally well.


1

Read the reg, it says during takeoff and landing. That is all. Once you are in a departure climb, you can unsecure your harness. When you are on an approach to landing, you should verify it is secure. Altitudes are rather irrelevant, because they are not in the regulation. Naturally best practice is to keep the belts on. The pilot flying usually has ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible