New answers tagged

1

I had many thoughts in the past on how to recover part of the energy dissipated by a landing aircraft. The best idea I came up with is to install on runways an arresting gear (like the ones used in aircraft carriers) connected to a power generating turbine. Of course there should be some sort of construction standards that all (heavy) aircraft should ...


0

Turbochargers are the practical implementation of this idea. A turbocharger uses the exhaust gases to spin the turbine which then forces more air into your car's engine and increases the engine's power.' According to the law of thermodynamics; 'energy can neither be created nor destroyed, only altered in form In the case of planes, already, most of the ...


-1

Other people have explained a lot of the issues with this system, but assuming you could finally build a system that works with all these restrictions in place and manages to produce power... You would produce orders of magnitude more power, cheaper and more efficiently, simply by directly burning the kerosene that these planes use to take off and fly and ...


18

No, there's no practical benefit to putting wind turbines alongside runways and plenty of drawbacks. Airplane engines and propellers direct their thrust straight back, so the only logical place to put a turbine for energy reclamation would be directly behind the runway threshold to catch the wind from engines as they are spooled up for takeoff. In order to ...


6

Safety would be a big issue. The runways are where planes take off - and land. Large windmills next to the runway would not be a good thimg. There is quite some energy expelled from the engines, and catching all of it on a busy airport would be worth looking at were it not for: The main jetstreams are flowing along the runway itself, where there may not be ...


0

As an example of a small international airport have a look at Saint Helena Airport, The World's Most Useful Airport. All flights are international, the record amount of passengers were in 2019 with about 8.500 passengers. Not all international airports are big.


4

Consider London airports: Heathrow (LHR): 2 runways Gatwick (LGW): 1 runway (there's technically a second runway, but it's so close to the first one they can't both be used at the same time) City (LCY): 1 runway (and a very short one with a steep approach!) Luton (LTN): 1 runway Stansted (STN): 1 runway Southend (SEN): 1 runway They are all international ...


13

Serious answer: one, Bianfable is correct. Slightly less serious answer: zero. In principle, there are scheduled flights from CHX (Vancouver Harbour) or YWH (Victoria Harbour) to LKE (Seattle Lake Union), all three of which of which solely operate seaplanes and have no "runways" in the normal sense of the word. (I say "in principle": it ...


1

Edited Wikipedia to show that the last three runways are only available to large aircraft in emergency. The actual rule is no scheduled flights over 9 passengers and no unscheduled commercial flights 31 passengers or more. Reference is the Chart Supplement, but of course that updates frequently so there's no good way to reference it except to say "type ...


15

In Germany, Lufthansa (the German flagship airline) and Deutsche Bahn (German railways) have a cooperation, where some Deutsche Bahn trains also have a Lufthansa flight number and Lufthansa sells airline tickets for those trains. As a result, some German train stations have an IATA airport code. And at last at some of them, I believe you can have your ...


24

Many international airports have only one landing strip, because this is not possible or not justified to build and maintain more. International strictly refers to customs services availability For aviation matters, including in the US, an international airport is an airport which can be used for international flights, as opposed to domestic flights only. ...


45

Instead of just looking at the minimum number of runways, I though it would be interesting to have a look at the overall statistics for the number of runways. So I went through my navigation database (AIRAC 2111) and filtered for international airports based on Wikipedia's list. The following histogram shows the number of runways for the 1356 international ...


11

San Diego International Airport (SAN), in San Diego, CA is one of the world's busiest single runway airports. Interestingly, Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport, also located in San Diego, is not an international airport, and has 3 runways. It is one of the world's busiest GA airports. So, 1 runway would be the minimum for an international airport.


6

Ketchikan International Airport in the State of Alaska, USA has one runway. http://www.airnav.com/airport/PAKT


11

Indeed: To permit the use of the automatic landing system, ICAO also recommends that slope changes must be avoided or, when it is not possible, kept to a maximum of 2% per 30m (i.e. a minimum radius of curvature of 1500m) in the area located just before the threshold (60m wide, 200m long). This limitation is due to the fact that automatic landing systems ...


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