39

First I have to admit that I have no idea what FAA regulations said about passengers taking part in controlling an airplane in 1989, but I guess it was at least frowned upon, even if the passenger happened to be a pilot. The United Airlines flight 232 made a stunningly successful "landing" at Sioux City airport, much due to the fact that they took an extra ...


32

The rules say to do whatever necessary to ensure safety of flight. 91.3 Responsibility and authority of the pilot in command. (a) The pilot in command of an aircraft is directly responsible for, and is the final authority as to, the operation of that aircraft. (b) In an in-flight emergency requiring immediate action, the pilot in command may deviate ...


27

As pointed out above pilots may deviate from any regulation in the event of an emergency per §91.3(b). One of the more common events is a civilian aircraft making an emergency diversion and landing at a nearby military airbase, such as this 777 flight which diverted to Erickson AB, Shemaya, AK. The OP brings up the case of Cactus 1549. But what Sully and ...


24

You wrote that: it would seem both aircraft will either perceive themselves as being to the left or right of the other meaning either both aircraft or neither aircraft would have the right of way. But that's only the case if the two aircraft are approaching head-on, or nearly so, and the FAR you quoted already accounts for that situation: Converging. When ...


24

In 2017 an MD-83 aborted takeoff above V1. The pilot was widely criticized for that, which was against a lot of rules and conventional wisdom. The NTSB report determined that aborting above V1 was the most correct thing to do in this case. https://www.planeandpilotmag.com/article/ntsb-report-how-this-pilot-saved-116-lives/#.XkzGlopOmhA


24

No, the airport wouldn't be closed, and the #1 aircraft doesn't need to go around nor be sent around. The risk of him shutting down the runway is very slight, and is probably of the same magnitude of risk that sending him around to hold until #2 has landed & the runway has been checked and reopened, would put him into a low-fuel emergency state. If ...


15

Yes, an IFR flightplan can be cancelled at any time. The pilot simply tells ATC "cancelling my IFR flight", then it is cancelled. Depending on airspace classification, ATC may need to issue a clearance to continue as a VFR flight. However, diverting to another destination than originally planned is not the same as cancelling a flightplan. To do so, ...


8

There have been cases with incorrectly wired controls, with the aircraft doing the opposite action than such a wrongly wired control commands. Then the narrow rules about how to use the control to achieve intended action must be completely reversed, moving the stick in the opposite direction. Doing so does not break the wider rules that cover such ...


7

Less busy than Gibraltar, but in the UK proper, Sumburgh in Shetland is an example of "road crossing the runway" on a relatively active airport - it even comes complete with level crossing gates, which are a startling thing to see on the road ahead when you know there's no railway!


6

I will note that in maritime law there is the General Prudential Rule which states that avoiding a collision takes precedence over strict adherence to other rules and regulations. I would have to believe that there are similar provisions in aviation rules.


6

Consider two aircraft converging at a 90° angle, as two cars arriving at a stop sign. "Rightness" or "Leftness" would be determined by the shortest angular distance between them: If B is 90° counterclockwise (right) of A, then A is 270° counterclockwise (right) of B—meaning A is 90° clockwise (left) of B. So B is "to the right" ...


6

Obviously, putting publically-accessible areas within an airport's apron, taxiways, or runway environments is normally avoided as much as possible. However, sometimes space constraints don't give you another option. As Federico mentioned in a comment, Gibraltar International Airport is a famous example of this. A major city street runs right through the ...


5

If you look at all the information in a flight plan, the route of flight is a relatively small part of it. Most of the data is about the aircraft (e.g. navigation and safety equipment), crew and passengers, which is used to determine if the flight is legal or by search and rescue folks if the aircraft goes missing. Given the volume of such data and how ...


5

My local aerodrome has a café underneath the control tower. To get to it, you have to go air-side and cross the main taxiway. There is no control on this - absolutely anybody can park up and walk over. It's not strictly a public right of way, but I'm sure one exists somewhere. With that said, I think you may be reading a little to much into it - the ...


5

Your question is a little vague; depends on the nature of the emergency for aircraft #2. Declaring an emergency provides the PIC with the power to obtain priority over any other aircraft. If the PIC of aircraft #2 determined that they needed aircraft #1 to execute a go-around, then pilot of #1 aircraft would be expected to do that if able. I will also ...


4

In the US, yes. There are no restrictions from the FAA on the size of aircraft you fly with a private pilot certificate. If the aircraft requires a type rating, you would have to get that added to your certificate along with the category and class. The insurance carrier covering that aircraft would probably have much more stringent requires over and above ...


4

There's probably not a specific number. The answer will probably end up being "however many can do and maintain separation." Some sectors will include more complex maneuvering (more than one airport, several different approaches, both commercial and GA aircraft) so the airspace would have to be broken up into many smaller sectors with fewer aircraft in ...


3

See and avoid is the backbone of VFR flight. The right thing to do when there is a potential collision is to take positive action, which is exactly what you did. There's no one-size-fits-all solution as to whether to turn one way or the other, climb or descend - it all depends on the position and course of the aircraft in question. Often which way to turn ...


3

Commercial airliners generally fly IFR as such they do what ATC tells them to do. They are not free to chose their own path. The airway system in the USA and elsewhere on the globe stems from the pre-GPS era when VOR's and other ground based nav aids were the predominant method of navigation. Airways tend to be either between VOR's or between points you can ...


2

It appears that the situation in your question is hypothetical. There are several aspects missing about the nature of the emergency, condition of the airport etc. A typical situation will require that the airport will be ready to deal with the emergency, and clear the intended runway where the aircraft declaring emergency can land without delays. In ...


1

I realize that the question was asking about EASA, but perhaps an FAA perspective will increase understanding. The FAA Pilot Controller glossary defines clearance as: AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL CLEARANCE [ICAO]− Authorization for an aircraft to proceed under conditions specified by an air traffic control unit. Note 1: For convenience, the term air traffic ...


1

Yes, but with major caveats. You'll have to get a multi-engine private rating. You'll probably have to be instrument rated. You'll have to get type-rated for the specific jet that you want to fly, and many type-ratings have fairly significant prerequisites Most aircraft like that are not certified for single pilot operation, so you will have to get an ...


1

This is probably one of those rules which is deliberately a bit open to interpretation. For example, a glider pilot will be happy to pass under another glider when hill soaring at 40 knots much, much closer than they would be if cruising at 100 knots! Other pilots will probably use standard separation minima, for example 500 feet might be acceptable in the ...


1

You did the right thing. The opening paragraph of section 3.2 (Avoidance of collisions) in ICAO Annex 2 (Rules of the Air) states: Nothing in these rules shall relieve the pilot-in-command of an aircraft from the responsibility of taking such action, including collision avoidance manoeuvres based on resolution advisories provided by ACAS equipment, as ...


1

For common procedures and or VFR rules you want to check the respective countries' AIP: Switzerland http://www.skyguide.ch/en/services/aim-services/ the other countries you mentioned can be found from this link collection http://www.eddh.de/equipment/ais.html you may want to check the website of Eurocontrol here you can find IFR standard arrivals and ...


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