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0

Whatever abbreviations/symbols you use are only relevant to YOU, nobody else needs to be able to read them, nobody else needs to approve them. The clearance will always follow the RAFT format, so write down the letters R A F T in a column on your pad, and then fill in what you're told on the appropriate lines, using as little writing as possible.


3

You may find it useful in the early stages to use a template with data blocks for writing your clearance instead of trying to copy everything said free hand. There are commercial options available, but it isn't difficult to create one yourself with a fill-in-the-blank format. For example, write or type out and print up a kneeboard card with: "N123Y is ...


5

Do what works for you, and omit what you can. For example, "N123 is cleared to KABC" can be condensed to "ABC"... assuming the clearance is for you, why copy your own tail #? You're copying a clearance, so "is cleared to" is, to me, entirely implied by the fact that there is something written. "Climb & maintain 7,000" is for me an "M" with a horizontal ...


13

If a pilot forgets to release his mic button, you can't talk to him. VHF radio is simplex, so only one station can transmit at the time. If more than one station transmits at the same time, the signal will sound garbled. As a result, there is no standard phraseology to use in such a situation. All you can do is wait for the pilot to discover the issue. See ...


4

If we look away from airlines for a minute, almost all callsigns are simply letters (and numbers) from the phonetic alphabet. Because Radio Telephony uses fairly specific formats, the likelihood of confusion is pretty low. " Delta 1234, after the landing traffic, line up and wait" simply can't mean anything other than what it's supposed to. It's got no ...


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In addition to the other answers I found a paragraph on HistoricWings.com which mentions this "problem". Local Variations Based on Need The international standard remains not quite completely standard, however, even to this day. You might notice, for instance, that when flying from Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, where Delta ...


34

Delta Air Lines uses the ICAO three-letter designator DAL and the ICAO telephony designator (also known as callsign) DELTA. In general, callsigns should be similar or equal to the name of the airline according to the following ICAO rules: 3.2 In the registration of telephony designators the following rules will apply: a) the chosen telephony ...


17

Delta DOES have its own callsign. It's "DELTA". There are literally thousands of airlines in the world, many of which have designated radio telephony callsigns. Some of them are very close or even identical to the airline name, others are more diverse. Bianfable gives a good explanation regarding the origin of the Speedbird callsign. While not the case ...


5

The most obvious reason is that the ITU allocated the VHF and UHF bands for aviation purposes generally, and then aviation authorities had to split those limited bands into adjacent comm and nav sub-bands. If aviation had gotten separate ranges for nav and comm, then that would double the risk of interference from adjacent non-aviation users, plus it would ...


29

No, ATC would not file a complaint for a single missed read back. In order to file a complaint they'd need to have very good reason to believe that the pilots were willingly breaking communication regulations, and there are so many other valid reasons for why this scenario could happen: The pilots may have responded but it may not have been received. If two ...


1

Another question touched this particular topic so I am linking it for your benefit. When has a pilot legally accepted an ATC clearance or instruction? The consensus is that the pilot is the PIC (Person In Command) and has the final authority. So there is actually no formal or explicit answer to your question.


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I would say that backtrack, takeoff, holding on the runway, and entering the runway for any other reason (for example to cross) are distinct actions that require readback. ICAO's Annex 11 (here reproduced from Appendix A of their Manual of the Prevention of Runway Incursions) regards all these items to require specific readbacks as clearances or ...


2

As an additional point... the reason ADS was given its own frequencies was so that other communications would not interfere with the needed Position and Identification information sent out via that method. ADS can in many places surplant the need (though I'm not at all suggesting that it should do so) for primary radar. There are too many things that can end ...


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