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69 votes

Is it acceptable to abbreviate “Foxtrot” to “Fox”?

Simply put: no, it is not ok to abbreviate the phonetic alphabet. The reason the phonetic alphabet is used in aviation is to make communications as clear as possible with minimum chances for ...
Jpe61's user avatar
  • 29.1k
40 votes

Why don't airports use different radio frequencies/channels for each plane to prevent communications from interfering with each other?

Because it is actually critically important that pilots all hear what is going on around them. In a perfect world, ATC could act as the go-between for everything. But in reality there are times when ...
manassehkatz-Moving 2 Codidact's user avatar
33 votes

Is it acceptable to abbreviate “Foxtrot” to “Fox”?

Bad mics, speakers, ears, or radio connections can remove plosives, siblants, and basically all consonants, in which case the phonetic alphabet is heard as follows: A-a, a-o, ar-ee, e-a, e-o, o-o, o, ...
Dewi Morgan's user avatar
18 votes

Is it acceptable to abbreviate “Foxtrot” to “Fox”?

It's not acceptable. @Jpe61 explains very well about the phonetic alphabet's design, I will not cover that any more. There are other reasons that it's a bad practice: If you shorten words or ...
GdD's user avatar
  • 54k
17 votes
Accepted

How does the emergency frequency work?

You're out of range of you airfield radio operator on the frequency they are tuned, but you almost certainly not out of range of all radio operators. In the UK, there are military units, LARS, area ...
Jamiec's user avatar
  • 33.7k
12 votes

Do ATC say "Climb to XXXX on standard" or "Climb to standard XXXX" or something else?

Standard phraseology says that below transition level, the controller may use the phrase "altitude", or omit it completely, but it is still clear - eg/ BigJet 456, Climb and maintain 5000 ...
Jamiec's user avatar
  • 33.7k
11 votes

Do civilian aircraft transiting through controlled airspace designated for military airports typically talk to the tower of that airport? (USA)

Military ATC facilities in the USA follow the same rules and procedures as civilian ATC facilities. There are a very few differences; certain branches of the military require Tower controllers to say &...
randomhead's user avatar
  • 15.6k
11 votes

Mandatory Reports to ATC on an Approach

It's absolutely not required, and would be a lot of needless clutter on the frequency. Listen to LiveATC or something similar for the final controller at any busy airport like LAX or Atlanta or really ...
Ralph J's user avatar
  • 51.8k
11 votes

Why don't airports use different radio frequencies/channels for each plane to prevent communications from interfering with each other?

Having separate frequencies all being handled by the same controller isn't going to solve two people trying to talk to the controller at the same time, just the opposite. There's rhythm to the ...
GdD's user avatar
  • 54k
10 votes

Did pilots use the radio in the Spanish Civil War?

The Heinkel 51s used in the Spanish Civil War had radio equipment. Messerschmidt Bf 109 versions A to E served in the conflict, the model B1 had FuG 7 radios. I can't find a source but I'd guess ...
Dave Gremlin's user avatar
  • 2,750
10 votes

Do ATC say "Climb to XXXX on standard" or "Climb to standard XXXX" or something else?

ATC will say “Climb Flight Level xxx”. There is no need to say “standard” because “Flight Level” is understood to mean standard pressure altimeter setting.
Mike Sowsun's user avatar
  • 37.8k
10 votes

Is it acceptable to abbreviate “Foxtrot” to “Fox”?

No, it is not acceptable. Even if all your radio transmissions were received with perfect audio fidelity and a minimum of RF interference, you still do not have a special right to give callsigns in a ...
Mackk's user avatar
  • 1,585
8 votes

Why are we still using audio to communicate between ATC and Pilot?

We are not - not exclusively, anyway. ACARS has been operational for over 40 years by now. No reason to use text-to-speech and reverse, though - if you go text, go text all the way. We have a question ...
Therac's user avatar
  • 27.6k
8 votes

How does the emergency frequency work?

Besides pretty much every ATC ground station, on airliners, with 2 Comm radios, normally Comm 1 is used for all ATC 2-way communications, and Comm 2 for ATIS, talking to Company ops, possibly air-to-...
John K's user avatar
  • 132k
8 votes
Accepted

Why don't airports use different radio frequencies/channels for each plane to prevent communications from interfering with each other?

There are different aspects to assess: Does that solve problems? Is it technically feasible and economically acceptable? Does that create other problems? Problem solved It can solve issues like ...
mins's user avatar
  • 74.8k
7 votes

Can I share ACARS messages online?

As I'm sure you're aware, this portion of the Wireless Telegraphy Act is essentially unenforced for casual and personal airband scanning, with many airports, and air shows openly promoting and ...
Dan's user avatar
  • 9,308
7 votes

Is it acceptable to abbreviate “Foxtrot” to “Fox”?

Is it a good thing, no, but is it legal? Yes. There is no requirement for pilots to utilize standardized phraseology in the US. A controller may have to ask for a second read back if he/she doesn't ...
RetiredATC's user avatar
  • 1,954
6 votes

Do civilian aircraft transiting through controlled airspace designated for military airports typically talk to the tower of that airport? (USA)

I've seen one case where banner tow aircraft operating east-west offshore about a mile (or less) from an Air Force base's runway 18/36 did talk to the military tower. Offhand I can think of two cases ...
Ralph J's user avatar
  • 51.8k
5 votes

Do civilian aircraft transiting through controlled airspace designated for military airports typically talk to the tower of that airport? (USA)

Frankly, you treat their airspace like you would any other class D airspace. The only thing required to enter is two way radio communications. Their controllers may divert you to other areas of the ...
Romeo_4808N's user avatar
  • 74.1k
5 votes

How impactful could an ATC-specific speech-to-text AI model be for the aviation industry?

The difference in impact between a really, really amazingly excellent model, and a fairly good model, is worlds apart. If I don't understand what was said on the radio, I can ask the sender to "...
Ralph J's user avatar
  • 51.8k
4 votes

Why are we still using audio to communicate between ATC and Pilot?

Lets take a few of your points in order As we know, most of aircraft accidents occur at the landing/takeoff phase and runway incursion is a very common issue. The first part is correct, the second ...
Jamiec's user avatar
  • 33.7k
4 votes

What is the meaning of (HR) (LY) (FOR) in radio phraseology?

"LY" and "FOR" are simply optional suffixes. In other words, "immediate" can be "immediately". "HR" can only be determined from inference: this is a ...
300D7309EF17's user avatar
  • 2,400
4 votes

How does the emergency frequency work?

At airports with a control tower, the antennas are located on the airport—on top of the control tower itself or on a dedicated (and relatively short) radio mast elsewhere on the field. As you have ...
randomhead's user avatar
  • 15.6k
4 votes

Do ATC say "Climb to XXXX on standard" or "Climb to standard XXXX" or something else?

An example of the US phraseology would be, "November one two three four climb and maintain one one thousand. Memphis altimeter three zero zero five."
RetiredATC's user avatar
  • 1,954
3 votes

Can the guard frequency be used by non-aircraft / general public?

In response to this: A further scenario that I am curious about ground use of the guard frequency would be in the case of witnessing a plane crash, if per chance you had an air band radio would it be ...
Stephan Samuel's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Radiotelephony Practices of American Pilots in Comparison to ICAO Standards

Short answer ICAO ATC phraseology is not mandatory, and is implemented by States members at different degrees, due to historical reasons: ICAO ATC procedures, including phraseology, are not part of ...
mins's user avatar
  • 74.8k
3 votes

Radiotelephony Practices of American Pilots in Comparison to ICAO Standards

In the US, there is no requirement for pilots to utilize standardized phraseology in ATC communications. I think most in the industry agree that the more standardized the communication, the level of ...
RetiredATC's user avatar
  • 1,954
3 votes

How do these lines sound as ATC communications?

It's hard to give a definitive answer to this, since there isn't standard phraseology for every possible situation. It's normal to use every day speech in situations like this, so it could sound in ...
60levelchange's user avatar
3 votes

Origins and Efficiency of the Phonetic Alphabet in Aviation

In 1944 english was chosen as the universal aviation language to simplify communications in the sky. Since not everyone is a native english speaker you have issues of accents when using a common ...
Dave's user avatar
  • 101k

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