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1

The term "critical engine" can actually refer to two very different factors: P Factor Engine driven accessories, depending on the airplane and how it's configured. A twin with counter-rotating propellers doesn't have a critical engine from a controlability perspective, but very often there are important engine driven accessories, like hydraulic pumps, ...


0

This doesn't specifically answer the question in the title, but from the body of your question I would say it's possible, if you had an electric push/pull configuration with a motor in the nose and one in the tail, or at the back of a fuselage pod with booms like a Cessna Skymaster. The aft facing motor could use simple fixed pitch folding propeller that ...


-2

Most important: tell your untrained passenger to keep the brakes applied no matter what. Then try to push the plane to make sure he's really on the brakes.


22

I’ll second John K’s answer. Do not attempt to hand prop an airplane without receiving professional instruction on how to do it safely. It is a real easy way to get seriously injured or killed, as this idiot almost found out. It should also involve two competently trained people, one to do the hand propping, and the ...


58

That is crazy. DON'T just rely on an person who's new to airplanes and only training is 5 minutes of showing them what to do, who may or may not react correctly when it springs to life, as the only thing preventing the plane from heading off somewhere while you try to dive clear. Don't. Do. It. Tie the tail. To something. Anything. Use the passenger and ...


1

If the person operating the throttle has to react within a fraction of a second to a changing sound that's unfamiliar to them, they're doomed. So play them a few videos of good and bad starts to make the sounds familiar. Tell them what to do in reaction to the changes. Quiz them a few times to ensure they understand. This might take ten minutes, but then ...


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