26

It looks like a 1921 Blackburn Dart, British carrier-based torpedo bomber biplane. (source)


25

It is a C-130 Hercules. Of the four engines , the only feature prominently visible is the outboard left propeller. I'm not sure why you thought it might have a "pusher" configuration-- the nose is to the left (off the edge of the photo), and vertical tail (with the "ANG" logo) is showing near the center of the photo. Other prominent ...


21

Most twin-engine aircraft with counter-rotating propellers have the rotation set up so that the propellers are rotating inward towards the center at the tops of the propeller arc. This configuration reduces the P-Factor effect at slow speed high angles of attack, and eliminates the "critical" engine that is present on multi-engine aircraft where both ...


17

That is a Stearman-Hammond Y-S1, registration NC15524, construction number 309. The remains of the aircraft are now owned by the Dutch aviation museum Aviodrome. They are planning to restore one of the four Stearman-Hammonds they have into flyable condition. This project is running since 2007, and is progressing very slowly. source: Smithsonian National ...


16

"Glide performance" is measured by "Lift-to-drag ratio": In aerodynamics, the lift-to-drag ratio (or L/D ratio) is the amount of lift generated by a wing or vehicle, divided by the aerodynamic drag it creates by moving through air When you look for examples you'll see that for the most part larger airliners do indeed have a more ...


13

That is a North American NA-36, BC-1, a North American NA-16 derivative, the predecessor of the North American T-6 Texan Source: nationalmuseum.af.mil Some observations that helped to determine the precise model: The fuselage is covered with fabric. Later models used metal The trailing edge of the rudder is rounded, later models had a straight rudder ...


9

A few reasons: if we're talking glide range from altitude, then jets certainly can glide longer! They fly MUCH higher than most props do, even turboprops! Second, propellers are draggy when they're at idle- you effectively have a big speedbrake on the nose of your plane. This is the reason a lot of planes have featherable props- they can be turned into the ...


8

I fly a large 4-engine turboprop. It uses constant speed hydraulic props, which automatically change blade angle to maintain 1020 rpm. The sync box (which I was unable to find a picture of) takes inputs from each engine's tachometer generator (where it gets the RPM signal) and a pulse generator, which is a magnetic pickup right behind the prop. There is a ...


5

From that really grainy, blurry picture, it looks like a C130 Hercules. bulbous fuselage Straight, ironing board-like wings High wing configuration 4 turboprop engines Huge, high empennage The rear is shaped like it could have a ramp. If you are sure it was a turboprop, it looks like the C130 is a strong contender.


5

There are four reasons why a propeller aircraft will exhibit a left-turning tendency: torque, spiraling slipstream, P-factor, and gyroscopic precession. Torque is due to Newton's third law of motion. As the engine spins the propeller, the propeller spins the airplane in the opposite reaction. Since most propellers spin clockwise as viewed from the cockpit, ...


5

Well helicopters are designed with both types of rotor systems. American built helicopters have main rotors which rotate counter clockwise whereas European built helos have clockwise turning rotor systems. Near as I know there is no particular advantage to one over the other, though you do have to reverse anti torque pedal corrections for collective inputs ...


5

Fan shrouds are a fix for a problem that can normally be designed around in other, more efficient ways. They do reduce tip loses, but usually the tip loses are smaller than the weight and drag penalty of the shroud. The fundamentals of prop/fan/rotor design is that thrust is proportional to the increased momentum of the air flow, but the power required to ...


4

There are two considerations. Two parallel vortices will tend to move upwards if the air flow between them is upwards. You can think of it as each 'blowing' the other upwards. This suggests the P-38 configuration maximises lift. I am not convinced but I don't have access to the software to know either way. Nor did they. The second consideration concerns ...


4

Speed is the reigning factor here, and aerodynamics as well of course. Speed. Propeller driven aeroplanes operate at lower speeds than jet engines - propellers are more efficient until compressibility effects start to appear, and it is these same compressibility effects that influence the wing shape as well. Compressibility as in: give air enough time to ...


4

By modulating the fuel flow to the slave engine, ie the one which is to synchronise to the "master" engine, Note. Limited authority of fuel modulation and not permitted in Take off or approach. One writer alluded to synchrophasing to not only reduce beating bit alos reduce noise, You can as I have done move the point of minimum noise around/along the cabin ...


4

The reason that efficiency is reduced during phases of flight that are flown at high airspeeds is because the angle of attack between the propeller and relative wind is reduced. If an aircraft is stationary on the ground, its propeller is taking a larger "bite" of air because there is no relative wind. When there is more air moving past the prop, ...


3

There's absolutely no difference as such between the two. If you removed the engines from both, there's no inherent difference. Note that, naturally, modern airliners (which are all jet) are incredibly better and more sophisticated than old-fashioned historic prop aircraft in every way. So, totally unrelated to the engines, of course they have incredibly ...


3

Chipmunk, left-handed engine: Spinning to the left, recovery takes 3/4 turn, spinning to the right, recovery takes 1/4 turn. In either case, descent rate is 6000ft/min, so not affected by the airflow direction.


3

why does power affect airplane´s aerodynamics? It doesn't. The aerodynamics will determine how much excess power is left for acceleration or climb. But not the other way around. Why is it important how much power […] the engine has? Because the power of a piston engine is constant for the same air density, regardless of speed. It is more helpful to give a ...


3

No, larger aircraft typically don't have such speeds shown on the ASI because they vary significantly with weight. See also Why don't Transport Category aircraft have a listed Vy?. For the Dash-8 Q400 for example, the $V_{\text{y}_\text{SE}}$ speed is called $V_\text{CLIMB}$: VCLIMB – Single-engine best rate-of-climb speed. The following table shows ...


3

Yes it does. The reasons are many, and complicated, but I will try to briefly summarize them here in simple terms. A jet-powered fighter has to pop through the sound barrier with minimum ill effect and be aerodynamically predictable at supersonic speeds. It also has to withstand the great stresses associated with these actions and those imposed by high-G ...


3

The prop diameter is chosen to provide suitable ground clearance for the desired installation. Then the reduction gearbox ratio is chosen to keep the prop tips subsonic. Then the number of prop blades is chosen to absorb full engine power. Compromises then get made to take advantage of off-the-shelf props in the market and standard gear ratios offered by the ...


2

I found one study comparing helicopter and airplane noise levels and signatures: Aircraft source noise measurement studies summary of measurements... Unfortunately this study does not provide conclusions or any abbreviated comparison in plain language (or I just failed to notice them). It does, however, provide a near endless array of tables to shuffle ...


2

It differs but not as much as it does for jet aircraft. This may seem counter-intuitive, but in spin, inertia and gyroscopic effects play major role. On propeller aircraft, the most practical difference must be with inadvertent entering spin, where power (and the associated asymmetry) is significant. But after entering spin, the first thing one does is ...


2

Although his design is based almost entirely on intuition and is wholly unworkable, as with most of Colani's design concepts, some recent study had made the swept supersonic propeller a fashionable topic of discussion at the time, but he pushed it way beyond its comfort zone. The idea of the sweep is the same as for the swept wing; to delay the onset of ...


2

In an inertial frame of reference, with a balanced propeller, there is no fore or aft forces except for the aerodynamic forces, so it will not make any difference if it is a left handed or right handed prop. Some very strange effects come into play though when you are not in an inertial frame of reference though, if you have a bicycle wheel lying around, ...


2

Aircraft power curve (a.k.a “polar”—a completely illogical name because somebody long ago plotted them in polar coordinates, which makes no sense, but the name stuck) This is just the power balance of the aircraft: the power provided by the propulsion system minus the power taken away by drag. You can divide the values by velocity (true airspeed) to get a ...


2

To talk about maximizing glide ratio is the same as talking of maximizing Lift/Drag (derivation can be given, "exercise for the reader"). Since lift is a given when gliding (we don't typically lose weight when engines are inoperative - and we consider a steady symmetric flight). To maximize L/D we minimize the drag. For a car, or other land based ...


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