Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
118

The reason is the large spinning thing on the front. Residual fuel in the engine has been known to auto-ignite (i.e. combust without a spark), causing the prop to spin, causing serious injuries and deaths. A lean cutoff reduces the risk that someone handling the prop will get maimed or killed. In a car when you turn the engine off usually it is in park or ...


71

If you make a radio call, unless you are on 121.5 (or 243 military), then only the station you are talking to will initially know about the emergency. Initial calls should always be with the unit you are working with unless you are VFR. If you squawk 7700, then all stations in transponder range, including possible airborne stations such as AWACS and SAR ...


64

What you are hearing is "V-One", written as V1. It actually is said when they can no longer safely abort the takeoff with the remaining runway, but they still are not quite ready to takeoff. As they get a little faster, there should then be a second callout of "Rotate" when they have achieved the required takeoff speed, and that is when they actually ...


57

As soon as there's a fire on board, the absolute top priority is getting everybody out as soon as possible. Aircraft are designed in such a way that, even after a crash landing (or other serious malfunction), the passengers will have a minute or two to evacuate before conditions in the cabin become toxic (fire, smoke, etc); this is done by using flame-...


48

If you're looking for a definitive source, how about the Shuttle Crew Operations Manual. It's essentially the POH for the Space Shuttle. Secton 2.14-2 says: The landing gear is deployed at 300 ± 100 feet and at a maximum of 312 knots equivalent airspeed (KEAS). Although, the targeted deploy speed was 288 KEAS according to the Normal Procedures section 5....


43

There is a procedure, at least for the aircraft crew. It is appropriate for a flight crew to transmit a "pan pan" or even a "mayday relay" so a passenger should immediately inform the senior cabin crew member, usually by asking to speak to the "purser". SOS is an internationally recognised distress signal. If the purser did not act upon it, I would ...


42

Ejection Seats are not a free ticket out. They are incredibly violent and rough on your body. This newspaper article has a more chilling quote from an interview: About one in three will get a spinal facture, due to the force when the seat is ejected - the gravitational force is 14 to 16 times normal gravity and it might be applied at 200G per second. ...


40

Well, "5 to 10 feet" is not "slightly." One or two feet is "slightly," and in that case you can maintain your landing attitude or pitch very slightly nose-down -- really a matter of the slightest change in pressure, not really a perceptible change in pitch -- and you'll land soon after that. However, for a larger bounce, the concern, especially on the ...


38

That's a weight check. The sign has the weight of the aircraft in pounds. The catapult crew guy first shows the presumed weight to the PIC who must give a thumbs up, agreeing, "Yes, that is the weight I believe my aircraft to have." The crew guy must then show the same exact set of numbers to the catapult chief operator, who must also approve it: "Yes, the ...


37

Aircraft squawking 7700 are getting a special indication (e.g highlighted, distinct colour, boxed) on Air Traffic Control (ATC) displays. This helps to identify the emergency aircraft not only to the air traffic controller who is controlling the airspace the aircraft is in, but also to controllers of other (nearby) airspaces. This helps to improve awareness ...


36

You stay vigilant by having seen things go wrong. Like Jamiec mentioned the importance of a proper preflight is drilled into you by your primary instructor from day one in light aircraft, and that mentality carries through all the way up to heavy transport-category aircraft: You want to find any problems you can while you're on the ground, because if you ...


35

Fighter jets escorting planes after various sorts of emergencies seems to be standard procedure in many countries, you hear about it quite frequently. It's sometimes implied in the media that if the situation would turn into a 9/11-type hijacking it might be necessary to shoot the plane down but nobody seems willing to fully clarify who could take such a ...


35

Combustion in a gasoline internal combustion engine for most aircraft, requires four things: fuel, oxygen, compression and ignition. If the engine is starved of fuel, accidental combustion (and an accidental spinning prop) will not happen. So shutting off the fuel is one way to prevent accidental "start" if even for one stroke. Oxygen is ubiquitous and ...


32

You should always pull the carb heat when throttling back no matter the conditions for 3 reasons: Ice forms from moisture (duh!), and there's much more moisture in hot tropical air than cold arctic air, so being in a tropical location does not lower the icing potential. The temperature drop is caused by the Venturi Effect which aerates the fuel in the ...


31

"Judgmental oversteering" means to intentionally not follow the taxiway centerline when turning. It is a technique used on large aircraft to turn on tighter or smaller taxiways. In a sense, it is like driving a long vehicle, such as a truck or a bus. Instead of following the lines on the road, the driver would deliberately overshoot the entry of turn, i.e. ...


26

Counter-intuitively, the FAA answer (see chart on page 1-9 and text on page 1-10) is actually, they should be off during the line-up-and-wait phase. When cleared to ... “Line up and wait”—when entering the departure runway without takeoff clearance, turn on all exterior lights (except landing lights) to make your aircraft more conspicuous. Then ...


24

And here, a Reference from Boeing's 737 FCTM (pdf). Ch2 for ground operations.


24

A "Safety Alert for Operators" (SAFO 09004) from 2/11/09 says "Slow the aircraft to a fast walking speed on the centerline of the landing runway prior to attempting to exit the runway. Taxi at a fast walking speed until parked at the ramp or until aligned with the centerline of the runway for takeoff." Which, of course, isn't a regulation, in this example ...


23

I know nothing about this topic but it's quite an interesting one so I did some Googling and found a detailed Airbus document called "Proper Operation of Carbon Brakes". It includes the following information: All brake manufacturers highlight the fact that carbon wear is heavily affected by brake temperature This is completely different from steel ...


23

At the commercial airline level, there is very little difference between a captain and a first officer, other than the amount of time that they have been at the company (seniority). Typically, each of the two pilots takes turns flying the airplane. For instance, if today's trip is from Miami to Charlotte to Chicago to Atlanta to Miami, the captain may fly ...


23

In commercial operations the vigilance to avoid complacency is derived from multiple reinforcing actions. Checklists are often preceded by flows in which you take a logical route through the aircraft panels and perform your checks from memory. These flows are then backed up by the checklist. Checklists vary in usage. One one end of the spectrum you have ...


23

If an airplane is close to V1, the brakes - which have to absorb kinetic energy and dissipate heat - can get hot to the point where the tires automatically deflate, to prevent them from exploding. For a 747 this involves a lot of smoke and glowing brake disks.


22

As late as possible to still meet your company's specific stabilized approach guidelines (mine were 500 ft VMC, 1000 ft IMC). If you need the drag, then use them earlier. In the EMB-145 in still wind or a headwind you could cross the FAF at 250 kts and clean and be on speed and configured by 1000' if you dropped the gear at the FAF (and opened the speed ...


22

You should check your POH but it may just be that the instructor in question was recently flying a lot of Pipers and it was force of [bad] habit. This POH for the 172S is in agreement with you. BEFORE LANDING .... Fuel Selector Valve -- BOTH. You should consult the checklist in the POH that is with the airplane in question to be sure.


21

I have no hard data answers to your questions. Perhaps others will. I can, though, offer some personal observations. My last two jobs were at 747 carriers. At the first we had two weeks on, two weeks off. At the second, we had 12 days off a month, which, with a little seniority, you could arrange to have as a block. For me, the first thing to go was my ...


21

"Follow-me cars", as they are known, make it easier for pilots to get to the correct spot by the correct route. This could be the runway before take-off, or the final stand after landing. They're useful at airports with complex routes and relieve the pilots of some additional navigation burden; their function is one both of safety and convenience. They ...


21

In addition to the reasons given by @Daniele, there are two others that I can think of: security and lack of visibility. At Amsterdam Schipol for a time at least in the 1990s there were two airlines, El Al and Tower that were escorted from the gate to the runway and from the runway to the gate because there was a concern about what we would now call ...


19

It is called "standard pressure" because 29.92 In-Hg (or 1013.25 hPa) is the standard atmospheric pressure at sea level according to both the ISA (International Standard Atmosphere) and the US 1976 Standard Atmosphere. Below 18,000ft, local altimeter settings are used because you need to know how high you are above terrain, or whether or not you're at the ...


19

I would interpret them as: ASAP means the plane is going to kill you. Soon. So land before that happens. Short runways, military airports, abandoned airfields, a decent highway, dry lakes (e.g. Edwards AFB), calm bodies of water (e.g. the Hudson River) are all possibilities. Do not concern yourself with operational issues like taking off again, and ...


19

Just one angle I would like to add to these excellent answers. Passengers might be slow to get off because they want to retrieve their passports, driving licences, phones etc. This could well result in people at the back losing their lives as explained in the other answers on this post. But consider this: if people are on the aircraft, the fire service can'...


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