55

This is called Powerback, most aircraft can do it, but it is not done very often. In a jet aircraft, the three main problems are: Reverse thrust tends to throw a lot of debris into the air because the exhaust is deflected to the sides and up and down too. This debris can damage the engine itself, other things on and around the aircraft or injure someone on ...


17

It can be done, in fact the DC-9 and MD-80 aircraft are approved for backing up using reverse thrust. It is called "powerback". It is rarely used since it is quite fuel consuming, noisy and increases the risk of sucking up debris near the gate area causing damage to the engines. Here's a video of an MD-80 backing up.


16

Most modern commercial airliners are prohibited to power back. Ground operations in aircraft fitted with high-bypass engines are usually restricted to idle and low-idle operations (enough to make the craft start moving, after which momentum enables further movement with idle only). Aircraft capable of power back are predominantly thus turboprops, several ...


11

Possible? Yes! But not recommended. There is nothing technical that would stop you from doing it. Thrust Reversers can be selected any time on the ground and there is enough thrust available to move the aircraft backwards. It is also not technically prohibited to do so: Reverse Thrust Intentional selection of reverse thrust in flight is prohibited. (Boeing ...


5

Any aircraft with thrust reversers or reversible props should in theory be able to execute a powered pushback, FOD and ground facilities damage notwithstanding. In a previous life I was an AC-130 crew chief -- loved the fact that those things could back up. But I think the main reason you don't see many air carriers using their thrust reversers for ...


5

From a pure theoretical standpoint, the speed limit would be whatever rolling speed can be achieved with max reverse thrust. If you deployed max reverse on a landing, and left the max reverse on until you stopped, then released the brakes and left it on as you started to roll backward, you would accelerate backwards, and if you were able to maintain steering ...


4

Can commercial airliners theoretically taxi backwards using reverse thrust? - After an airshow at RNAS Yeovilton, Somerset in the 1980s a British Airways Concorde found it could not taxi out for departure as it had been parked too close to an adjacent hangar (and didn't have the required turning circle)... there was no suitable towing gear on site, or within ...


3

"Possible" as in, "last flight out of Saigon, we'll try anything because the alternative is worse," maybe. But Boeing doesn't publish any procedure for it, as far as I've ever seen, and they generally take a very dim view of using T/R's at low speed. It isn't in any published non-normal procedures. I've also heard, anecdotally, of one ...


3

An air carrier must also have OPSPEC C065, POWERBACK OPERATIONS WITH AIRPLANES to do this. OPSPEC C065—POWERBACK OPERATIONS WITH AIRPLANES. A. General. C065 authorizes the use of powerplant reversing systems for rearward taxi operations. Before issuing C065, the principal operations inspector (POI) must determine whether the operator meets ...


1

Both power back and taxiing under thrust are on their way out. Efficiency is horrible, so electrically powered wheels are planned for the next step in fuel efficiency improvement. Not to be misunderstood: Currently this is not yet being used on production aircraft. But it looks likely to come.


1

I've got a few hours in the 1900 and a couple hundred in the smaller KingAir. I think you can reverse the props while sitting still and push back with the negative thrust. But you probably shouldn't. You'd probably be safer doing it in the Beech than a 737, since the intakes on the Beech are significantly smaller (and have the prop directly in front of them ...


1

A plane can powerback if you can configure the engines to provide more backwards thrust than forward thrust. Fixed pitch propellers can't provide any reverse thrust. With variable pitch props it depends on whether the there is enough pitch control to reverse it. However powerback has the risk of debris getting into the engine. The air will blast forwards ...


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