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5

Here's what's going on. You have two major compressible elements on the landing gear: the "oleos". Movement is not possible anywhere else. You can imagine a line straight through them. The center of rotation will be somewhere between the oleos along that line, based on the ratio of spring resistance on each one. You see the line of thrust is not down ...


4

I think both answers here are correct, but I want to attempt a simple explanation. Take the image below. Think of the stationary jet as a lever, with the rear wheels as the fulcrum. When the engines are throttled up, it causes the lever (the body of the jet) to rotate about the fulcrum. This pivoting is what compresses the front gear. This is almost ...


12

Look carefully and you can see the nose strut is compressed down to only a few inches of chrome as the thrust applies a torque moment, or nose down pitching moment, about the fixed axis of the main tire contact points with the runway. On brake release, the axis about which the torque is being applied, the rubber to runway interface, is also no longer fixed,...


41

When the brakes are on, they apply a backwards force that counters the engine thrust. This force is applied at ground level, and the engine thrust is higher. These two forces result in a moment that forces the nose down, compressing the nose gear slightly. When the brakes are released, the moment disappears and the nose gear extends. Another factor here is ...


2

Think not about the rate of pitching but rather about the skyward or earthward curvature in the flight path (trajectory). This curvature is an acceleration, and requires a force to make it happen. G-load (i.e. load factor) is essentially just the aerodynamic force generated by the aircraft, divided by weight. In straight-and-level flight the G-load is +1. ...


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