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2

Radial engines like the P&W R-985 contain a geared impeller disc that centrifugally slings the fuel/air mixture around in the manifold from the carb out to the intake runners for each cylinder. This disc spins at greater-than-crankshaft speed and is intended to stir the mixture sufficiently well so that each cylinder is feeding on the same mixture as all ...


2

No, one is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_cycle one is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brayton_cycle, thermodynamicly extremely different


8

Lycoming offered mechanical superchargers in some of their large 6 and 8 cylinder opposed engines like the GSO-480 but such engines have been out of production a long time. I would say the only mechanical superchargers to be found on any engines manufactured today would be found on Russian or similar Eastern European radial engines like the M14P. I'd be ...


1

Don't forget turbonormalizer - a turbocharger that only boosts to sealevel pressure. Seen on small planes. https://taturbo.com/tnvtc.html https://taturbo.com/177features.html


3

"Turbosupercharger" was General Electric's official term for their system, probably the first mass produced turbocharging system and was used on a range of US fighters and bombers (the system was very sensitive to back pressure in the turbine outlet which could promote stalling, and so they either had the turbine exposed like on the P-38, or if there was an ...


5

A turbocharged engine is a common gas engine with pistons The limiting factor on a gas engine is how much air can get into the pistons. It is supercharged - that is, an air pump forces more air into the engine than it would draw naturally. The mechanically driven variety is seen on Mad Max. If you use exhaust flow to spin the pump, it is turbosupercharged. ...


38

They are both internal combustion engines that have a turbine in their exhaust that is used to power a compressor to pressurize the air before it is used for combustion. In the turboprop, the turbine also powers the prop. In between the compressor and turbine, the fuel/air mixture is burnt without significant moving parts. Without the turbine and ...


3

They are completely different things, a turboprop is similar to a jet engine as it has compressors, the main difference is that there's a shaft that spins a propeller instead of turning a fan. A turbocharger is device for piston engines, it uses pressure coming from the exhaust manifold of a piston engine to compress air going into the intake manifold. It'...


22

No, a turboprop is more like a jet engine with a propeller in the front instead of a fan: Source: Wikimedia In its simplest form a turboprop consists of an intake, compressor, combustor, turbine, and a propelling nozzle. Air is drawn into the intake and compressed by the compressor. Many turbo props have a gear box (as shown in the image above, the ...


3

No such thing as EPA compliance on General Aviation engines or ultralight engines for that matter. You buy a piston engine from Continental or Lycoming, it has no pollution controls of any kind. It's like it's 1960. There just aren't enough of them to make any real impact, so they get a pass. Pretty much anything goes for a Part 103 Ultralight in the US ...


0

When I was taught to fly in an Aeronica Champ in 1966 my instructor would always tell me to apply carb heat just before reducing the power for landing. Leave the carb heat on until you are going to reply the power for a go around. As others have stated if roughness was detected ad carb heat. My instructor taught Sully how to fly in 1967. :-)


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