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There are various aircraft cost of ownership services available such as this one. I would use this as it will be the big recurring financial investment once you purchase the aircraft. Remember the purchase price is only the beginning and just gets you a very expensive paperweight in a hangar. The big items are going to be the operating costs. You’ll also ...


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~$175K to buy one (mid 70s, Tradeaplane.com) Have to charge enough per hour or flight to pay your loan, 30/40 gallons/hour in fuel (how much do twin TSIO-520-NB burn?), oil, hangar most likely, insurance, future maintenance costs, database/charts, 100 hour inspections, landing fees, FBO fees, plus some profit to live on and pay taxes against. Cargo hauling? ...


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Making money in GA is very difficult. But it is possible, there are companies that do it well. But we will certainly need more info to answer your question, or more accurately, that you will have to ask yourself before you proceed. What kind of work? Charter? Where are you, do you have access to a maintenance base? Will you buy the aircraft used or new? ...


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I will answer this question with the caveat that it is asking for an opinion, and therefore your experience may vary due to different regulatory authorities. I answer this question from an Australian CASA context but note that while there are differences between CASA, EASA and FAA, they operate so similar that in many cases the courseware I teach to students ...


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As has been said, there is no one exact rule, but a broad estimate can be easily produced. There are 12,500 active duty pilots in the USAF, and the service counts just over 5,000 manned aircraft. This will give an overall, rough, ballpark figure of 2.5 pilots per aircraft across the entire force. Counting aircraft types by pilot seats, one can calculate ...


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The pilot-to-aircraft ratio depends mostly on the aircraft type the squadron flies. For example, a fighter squadron might have far more aircraft in its fleet than an airlift or reconnaissance squadron. There is no fixed number.


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Of which type of pilot are you asking: Student Military Private (hobbyist) Corporate Airline I will be using the term licensed to loosely mean certificated, current, and proficient with the proper endorsements and documentations. The short answer is no. They are not obliged/obligated to fly the same aircraft. The pilot can choose to fly in any aircraft ...


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I pilot I know used to own a folding motorcycle for such purposes; when stowed it was about the size/weight of a large suitcase and I'm fairly sure (this was 30 years ago) it would fit through the luggage hatch of his Cessna 172. It could carry two people but at 49cc, and a two stroke engine at that, it was certainly a leisurely and perhaps fragrant way to ...


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Typically the FBO's courtesy car is used, but I've flown into a lot of airports that either do not have an FBO (or the FBO does not have a courtesy car), or it was after hours and no one was around. Sometimes you might not even have cellular service in the remote airports and they won't have a landline phone in a public area. That's when you either start ...


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In my experience, in the United States, most General Aviation airports, GA sections of the airport, and Fixed Based Operators have one to a fleet of courtesy crew cars. If you are a pilot being serviced by that particular facility, you are given access to a crew car. The length of time you can use the car can be anywhere from one to four hours, depending on ...


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You do whatever you can. Sometimes you call a taxi/Uber, sometimes you walk, sometimes you pack a small folding bicycle into your plane, and sometimes you borrow the airport car. Many small airports in the US have a car (often a retired police car) available for itinerant pilots to borrow. It's usually a scary rusted out pile of junk, but it works. If ...


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