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4

I spent many years in ATC quality assurance. It is a joint responsibility for the controller to issue a valid clearance and ensure the pilot reads it back correctly, and for the pilot to hear the clearance correctly and acknowledge it. If the controller issues a valid clearance, such as "climb and maintain one zero thousand" and the pilot says &...


5

According to this AvWeb article, in early 1999 the FAA issued an "interpretive rule" covering this exact situation. The rule is available in text and PDF form at the Federal Register. Part of the "History" section of the rule states (emphasis mine): [...] when a miscommunication or misunderstanding occurs, the FAA deems responsible the ...


9

It's on the controller, even if the pilot intentionally read back an error. It has to be that way in "the moment". That pilot's intent is difficult to prove, anyway, but it can be done, in extreme cases. When was a new radar trainee, so, let's say 1990 (wow, a whole 'nother century), we had a pilot that flew for Rocky Mountain Airways, a regional ...


5

Few texts mention Rhea Allison (Rhea Woltman) as "secretary and executive pilot for a small aircraft sales and engineering firm" (additional copy). Other mention her as a regular commercial "pilot": When she started the astronaut curriculum for Mercury, "Woltman was working as a charter pilot in Houston". There is nothing ...


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