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3

Depends on how bad is the sea state, but the general technique for seaplanes is to land parallel to the swell, preferably on top of a wave: When landing on a swell system with large, widely spaced crests more than four times the length of the floats, the best landing heading parallels the crests and has the most favorable headwind component. In this ...


1

it’s dependent upon the aircraft in question and the approach speed that they need to use, but assuming a fighter aircraft like an F-18 with an approach speed somewhere in the neighborhood of 130 knots a typical 3.5° glideslope to impact yields a descent rate on somewhere between 600-700fpm. The faster the ship is moving at the greater the surface winds it’...


-2

How high are the waves? Timing into the wind, proper flare and try not to capsized I reckon. Never sideways to the waves.


-1

It is not possible to have the rudder deflection because the huge amount of AOA and control law take that in consideration and cancel (fadeaway) the pilot rudder inputs.Activating the MPO the slabs moved max in order to get the nose down to lower AOA and after that we can get responses from the rudder


12

The other answers have already correctly stated that lowering the nose is the first action, and that you do not fiddle with the configuration when stalled. I'd like to add a point relating to smaller propeller aircraft: when flying at the edge of stall, or even stalled (some GA planes are surprisingly docile even under full stall), you do not want to ...


6

The priority is to unload the wings: which means lower the G load on the wings because the stall speed increases with higher G loads and reduces with lower G loads until reaching 0 with 0 G. So an aircraft can stall at any speed really, it all depends on the G factor it is subjected to. That's why when you stall the first thing you should do is to lower the ...


29

The instinct drilled into a pilot's head from the beginning as the primary response is "lower the nose" to lower AOA. If you learn in a glider, that's the only option, so it's easy to drill the instinct into peoples' heads (one reason that glider training before power is so good for pilot skills later). In a power plane, it's lower the nose and add as much ...


4

The priority is to reduce the AoA. This can be done in several ways (changing the attitude by lowering the nose, changing the chord line by lowering the flaps, thus reducing the effective AoA, increasing the airspeed by opening the throttle, thus lowering the effective Aoa...) The choice depends on the flight conditions, and it's the pilot's choice...


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