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55

The pilot in command has final authority over Air Force One Air Force Instruction 11-202, Volume 3 says the following in Chapter 1, part 1.1.1 (as in, the very first thing in the document): 1.1.1. Pilot in Command Authority. The Pilot in Command (PIC), regardless of rank, is responsible for, and is the final authority for the operation of the ...


23

The regulatory bodies are reluctant in defining a regulation for that. Because there are first officers who do not hold an Airline Transport Pilot License. The airlines would need to add an extra flight member for that rare situation. Instead, it's up to each airline's SOP when it comes to Crew Resource Management. There are various assertiveness training ...


15

The captain is the captain, so when he says "go around" then the PF needs to initiate the go-around. If the FO doesn't initiate the go-around as directed, then the captain can (at that time as at essentially any other time he sees it necessary) take over control of the aircraft. That's the captain's authority and it's pretty clear. The other case is ...


13

The scope of the part 91 exception is exactly what it says: deviate from any rule of this part, i.e. part 91. But remember that part 91 applies to all flights anyway; part 121 (or 135 etc.) regulations are in addition to part 91, not instead of them. But that still means that 91.3(b) doesn't give any authority to deviate from other parts, like 135 or 121 ...


11

There was a case in 2012, where the captain started acting erratically on the flight deck. The first officer tricked him out of the cockpit and shut the door behind him. Passengers restrained the captain until an emergency landing could be made. In a more recent similar case, a captain was removed before the flight had ...


8

There is a contradiction in your question. You say both the student and instructor are logging PIC. This is fine, but the authority for this to happen depends on certain things. The instrument student logs PIC under 61.51(e)(1)(i) (1) A sport, recreational, private, commercial, or airline transport pilot may log pilot in command flight time for ...


8

I think you fell for a common misunderstanding: Fly by wire ≠ flight control augmentation It is - in the first place - another method to get the pilots input out to the control surface just like cables or pushrods. Just not mechanical but electric/digital. If you want to alter the pilot input for whatever reason it is way easier with digital signals ...


8

In the end it's all up to the Captain. If the FO is PF, which with most airlines alternates with each leg of a block, and something exciting happens, the capt may let the FO continue flying if the capt feels the FO has things under control. Or the capt may say "I have control" and take over. Depends. The Pilot In Command is pilot in command. He/she ...


5

If they were fighting, intentionally attempting to gain control over the stick, the pilot pressing the last would win. This differs from the situation in a cockpit with coupled controls, where the pilot who pushes hardest wins. So in an Airbus, a quick pilot wins from a strong pilot.. From the FCTM: When the Pilot Flying (PF) makes an input on the ...


3

This really depends on whether or not the authorized instructor and / or the pilot can legally be the pilot in command. By this I mean they are current with a flight review. Neither the student pilot nor the flight instructor need to be landing current as the purpose of the flight is a training flight. See the Kortokrax interpretation from the FAA. If ...


1

The AIM is not regulatory, just best practices approved by the FAA. You should do what the AIM says, but as PIC you are free to ignore it. The FARs are regulatory, so as long as you don't violate them, what you're doing is legal. You must do what the FARs say (unless you have an emergency, of course). In the case of pattern entry, other pilots are ...


1

The short answer is no. Otherwise it's mutiny. That said it's exceptionally rare where one has to take control from the Captain, but not so much the Captain taking over from the F/O. The F/O is second in command of a ship. As such has a moral and legal responsibility to his Captain and to his charges. (F/A and pax). If, the Captain is unable to carry out his ...


1

Seems that this has happened multiple times if there is something wrong with the Captains behaviour. If he is doing something that clearly endangers the flight, the remaining crew will at least attempt remove him from duty before its too late, regardless if there are rules defined for that or not. Japan Airlines Flight 350 can be an example. If the reasons ...


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