Hot answers tagged

15

Pretty much every FO struggles with this. Technically yes, in the extreme case. If the actions of the capt are about to get everybody killed or otherwise endanger the aircraft, the FO is supposed to have the authority and an obligation, after a suitable verbal interchange, to intervene by saying "I have control" and take over. Generally there needs to be ...


13

No, you do not need a complex airplane endorsement for this airplane because it doesn't have retractable gear, unless it is a seaplane. All three elements are required for that endorsement to be necessary for landplanes. A jet-engine is not a controllable-pitch propeller, therefore it would not require a complex endorsement even if it has retractable gear ...


12

Yes, the FO is allowed to take over control from the captain on his own initiative, if the circumstances justify it. One case that I know off where it saved the day was this incident of Lufthansa. On rotation for take-off the aircraft started to roll. Corrections by the captian only aggravated the situation until very quickly the aircraft's wingtip was ...


11

Yes. You can, as long as you have the appropriate rating and are the sole manipulator of controls. From a FAA response to a similar question: ... a private pilot may log pilot-in-command time, in a complex or high performance airplane, for those portions of the flight when he or she is the sole manipulator of the controls because the aircraft being ...


9

In the US, there are two types of "PIC" that can be logged & may be interesting to report -- such as for an interview, perhaps. Most common when starting out is "sole manipulator of the controls" -- and FAR Part 61 (61.51.e.1.i) defines this. This includes essentially "sole manipulator of the autopilot," so the pilot who is designated as the PF -- ...


9

No The way that both pilots can log PIC is that the pilot using a view limiting device is logging PIC as sole manipulator and the safety pilot is logging PIC because he is acting PIC and a required crew member. If the flight is operating under an instrument clearance then the acting PIC must be instrument rated. If only the pilot with the view limiting ...


8

There is a contradiction in your question. You say both the student and instructor are logging PIC. This is fine, but the authority for this to happen depends on certain things. The instrument student logs PIC under 61.51(e)(1)(i) (1) A sport, recreational, private, commercial, or airline transport pilot may log pilot in command flight time for ...


7

Can the acting PIC sit in the rear seat? There's no regulation or FAA interpretation I can find that requires the acting PIC to sit in a seat with access to the controls. For flight instruction specifically, 14 CFR 91.109(a) requires dual controls (usually) and the instructor must be at a "pilot station" (14 CFR 61.195(g)(2) and Williams ...


7

Category: Yes, both are "airplanes" as opposed to rotorcraft or gliders. Class: Yes, both are single engine land planes, as opposed to multi-engined or sea planes. Type: Yes, neither aircraft requires a type rating (both are under 12,500 lb max takeoff weight, neither is powered by a turbojet) So the Piper Archer and Pilatus PC-12 qualify as currency for ...


6

Why more experience is required to fly the airliner above I assume 6096 meters? I would expect, taking off and flying close to terrain should need more experience. I'm unaware of any regulation that requires a minimum number of hours to be a captain or first officer above FL200. That doesn't mean there aren't such, just that I don't know of them. It's not ...


4

As background, see this question for a general explanation of how safety pilots can log time. Also have a look at the Gebhart (2009) interpretation for the cross-country part. Note that the two key things to keep in mind in these logging scenarios are: Acting as PIC and logging PIC time are two different things You have to be very clear about who is the ...


4

hoax, totally. that plane is travelling at about 550MPH and the forces required to turn it 180 degrees with a radius of ~two wingspans would destroy the plane and kill everybody in it.


3

The safety pilot can't log any acting PIC time but he could still log PIC time as sole manipulator of the controls (if he ever takes the controls, that is). That's from an FAA legal interpretation (based on this previous one) that clarifies logging PIC time under IFR without an instrument rating. The interpretation discusses an instrument-rated pilot ("...


3

This really depends on whether or not the authorized instructor and / or the pilot can legally be the pilot in command. By this I mean they are current with a flight review. Neither the student pilot nor the flight instructor need to be landing current as the purpose of the flight is a training flight. See the Kortokrax interpretation from the FAA. If ...


2

As pilots we often talk about night flying and daytime flying meaning when it is dark or light, but for logging time and for currency in the US there are specific definitions that we must pay attention to. FAR 1.1 General Definitions Night means the time between the end of evening civil twilight and the beginning of morning civil twilight, as ...


2

You're asking two questions here: can you log dual given, and can you log PIC. I assume you already know that you can write anything you want in a logbook; the FAA only cares about it when you use logged time to meet their experience requirements for something. Employers and insurance companies may have their own, different expectations, though. Anyway, "...


2

It’s your logbook, so you can write in it anything you want. If a future prospective employer sees somebody doing what you described, the chances of being hired would fall drastically, since nobody in their right mind believes that the FO as PM is providing meaningful or valid “instruction” in a Part 135 or 121 environment to the Captain. If an FAA examiner ...


2

The regulations regarding the logging of time are specified in FAR Part 61.51 (Pilot Logbooks): (a) Training time and aeronautical experience. Each person must document and record the following time in a manner acceptable to the Administrator: (1) Training and aeronautical experience used to meet the requirements for a certificate, rating, or flight review ...


1

You can log XC, PIC, simulated instrument, category/class, day/night, Total flight time. From a regulation standpoint. Cross time can be logged pursuant to §61.1 Cross-country time means - Except as provided in paragraphs (ii) through (vi) of this definition, time acquired during flight - (A) Conducted by a person who holds a pilot ...


1

The AIM is not regulatory, just best practices approved by the FAA. You should do what the AIM says, but as PIC you are free to ignore it. The FARs are regulatory, so as long as you don't violate them, what you're doing is legal. You must do what the FARs say (unless you have an emergency, of course). In the case of pattern entry, other pilots are ...


1

Yes. You can log actual and simulated instrument time while being the sole manipulator of the controls without the complex endorsement. See FAR 61.51.


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