New answers tagged

1

It's because normally tailed aircraft (and flying wings) depend on an equilibrium state between opposing pitching forces for static stability, and an inherent tendency of the aircraft to seek this equilibrium state on its own. So you need a nose down pitching moment that is always present, acting about some "balance point", being the aerodynamic Neutral ...


6

Centre of pressure (CP), by definition, is the point at which the aerodynamic moment of something is zero. If you are talking about the CP of the whole airplane, then at trim condition, the CG must always coincide with its CP. Period. This is achieved for any operational speed through well designed pitch control that varies in flight. For example, ...


3

Because: If centres of pressure and of gravity would coincide, there would be no inbuilt tendency for the nose to drop upon an adverse aerodynamic event like a stall. If someone walks along the aeroplane and shifts the CoG, the two centres no longer coincide. There is some range required for the CoG. An aeroplane must have static and dynamic stability in ...


Top 50 recent answers are included