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2

Bombs aren't just laid together in a bomb bay and dropped out of the bottom of the bomber. They are connected to a launcher, like the Conventional Rotary Launcher in the B-52 (google that for nice pictures), that times the release of bombs to minimize any chance of overlaps during the actual launch process. In addition since the bombs are all the same size ...


3

Then there is always the trusty Intervalometer which controls the rate or interval at which bombs are dropped. The intervalometer generates electrical impulses that actuate the bomb release units. It may be set fore either selective or train release of bombs. When set at SELECTIVE, the intervalometer generates a single release impulse each time it receives ...


35

Because there's a lot of engineering effort to make sure the bombs are cleanly and safely released from the aircraft (safely, that is, for the aircrew, not for the recipients). Aside from the safety issues, it is also necessary to ensure accuracy. The concern is in the first couple seconds after release when the bomb is moving through the air surrounding the ...


8

If you’ve ever parachuted from an aircraft you’ll know that although you might expect to float gently away into the air, you do in fact drop like a brick. Bombs are typically released in a controlled manner and so they will tend to separate vertically as they fall. Given the significant weight of a bomb it’s most unlikely that there would be enough ...


8

Empirically, yes it's legal. I've seen several reproduction WW1 aircraft myself at airshows with fake guns, missiles or bombs attached. And I was once at an EAA chapter meeting where a member demonstrated his fake gun 'firing' using compressed air. There are also factory-built aircraft with fake weapons added later, by the way. As to regulations on this, I'...


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