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8

If the NOTAM duration is expected to return to service prior to the End of Validity time, the time is expressed by using a date-time group followed immediately by EST (estimate). Any NOTAM that includes an EST must be canceled or replaced before the NOTAM reaches its End of Validity time. If the NOTAM is not canceled or replaced, it will expire at the end ...


8

FICON is outlined in FAA JO 7930.107 "FICON REPORTING". FICON is the "FIeld CONditions reporting. It identifies information that used to be called "braking action", but is now a little more succinct. The conditions for the runway are reported in thirds, [First Third]/[Middle Third]/[Last Third], with the following data outlined on page 6: So 5/5/5 means ...


6

Actually it doesn't have anything to do with voice capabilities: 5-3-5. UNMONITORED NAVAIDs a. All VOR, VORTAC, and ILS equipment in the NAS have automatic monitoring and shutdown features in the event of malfunction. Unmonitored, as used in this order, means that the personnel responsible for monitoring the facility have lost aural and visual monitoring ...


3

The general convention is that the rotating beacon is only on at night or during IMC. The airport or ATC can choose differently. It would not be the norm and probably should be pointed out to pilots approaching the airport. It would also help identify the airport if there is confusion with multiple nearby airports of similar size and structure.


2

It turns out, in this particular case, the reason the rotating beacon was left on during the day time and was NOTAMed as such is because it was broken and could not be turned off by the tower. What has been gathered is that there is no standard reason why an airport would intentionally leave its rotating beacon on during the day in VMC conditions.


2

Estimated. Oddly, this isn't stated explicitly in JO 7930.2, Notices to Airmen (NOTAM).


1

NOTAMs are a planning aid. Before flight you look at the NOTAMs that are applicable to your route, including diversion airfields, and extrapolate the information you need. A NOTAM may make you change your route, or take a note to use a different frequency or procedure. You may make a notation on a map, for example, or a hand-written note on your pad, ...


1

Use or check? NOTAMs can give pilots of a wide range of information, so in terms of use each NOTAM is different. For example, they might tell the pilot that a frequency has changed - so that's something they may need to integrate into their flight at the relevant point. Or, the classic, is that there are standing NOTAMs in the UK that overflying Ukraine and ...


1

Reference: ICAO Annex 15, Appendix 2 According to the article ''H''; what about the other runway/runways when I want to add extra info other runway/runways too; there is just one runway in here? A SNOWTAM is for a single runway, if you want to involve multiple runways, you would release more than one SNOWTAM. According to the article ''J'' it is ...


1

Military operations are conducted in certain airspace blocks that should be well marked on your charts. If you are IFR your route should avoid such areas, if you are VFR, hope you know what you are doing.


1

Because the FAA imagines that we are still in the teletype age, and thus believes that every bit of text not actually burned into the the paper scroll (or perhaps we should say every byte of information not transmitted over the wires) is a precious saving of some sort. It's exactly the same misguided reason that airport weather reports (METARS) are still ...


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