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24

These are antennae for the IFF (Identification Friend or Foe) system. IFF is a system to help distinguish friendly aircraft from unfriendly ones. This particular antenna arrangement is used on only a couple of F-16 models. The first was the F-16 Air Defense Fighter (ADF) version. This model was converted from the F-16 Block 15 for use as a fighter ...


7

Cockpit windows that sit flush with the fuselage can save a very small amount of drag, but they require large double curvature window panes. Manufacturing such panes is significantly more expensive and there was limited commercial availability for that product when the A320 was being designed. You can see a few more examples of flat vs curved windows here: ...


6

Also, to add to Wayne's answer, there are multiple antennas because the computer that processes the data received compares the phase of the signals received from each of them to calculate the direction the signal came from... Because they are separated from one another, any signal received from a point directly in front of them will be received at the same ...


6

The lines on the nose radome (radar dome) of airplanes are called segmented lightning diverter strips, and they're made by a few different companies, one of which is Weather Guard Lightning Tech Electric charge builds up on the nose of the plane (on the radome) as makes contact with high-velocity particles in the air, which include rain, ice crystals and ...


4

Excluding those aircraft in your question the answer is no. The 747 started really as a cargo aircraft, but given that more and more aircraft are available, the cost of development of another cargo only aircraft doesn’t make sense. Cargo operators can just buy old passenger aircraft, and they will continue to as the cost of development of aircraft is ...


3

What you are missing is suction on that round nose which adds some thrust. Granted, around that stagnation point there is a pressure region which also acts on a forward-facing surface, thus creating drag. But that region is small. Thanks to the curvature of the elliptic nose shape, air accelerates quickly out of this high pressure region. In order to follow ...


2

According to Wikipedia, the UBL variant of the TU-134 was designed/used to train TU-160 crew, and is using its nose-cone. As to why, I think we can only assume. I think that a fair assumption would be that it contains the radar from the TU-160 (or a stripped-down version of it), and/or so the crew will have a similar visibility as they would on a TU-160. The ...


2

The dents are there to provide a proper thickness window for DEF systems. Ferry noses had no need for DEF systems and so didn't have the bulges. If you look carefully at the noses you will see that there is a band just aft of the pitot mast that is all composite and it was called an isolation something or other. There were several noses. OBC is optical ...


1

There are no historical aircraft with an aerospike nose, at least, none that I remember, and none that I could find after 30 mins of research. I'm not sure if there are any planned projects using it, but I doubt there are, given the purpose of aerospike noses - aerospike noses really only have one main purpose - to streamline a blunt body. This is commonly ...


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