Hot answers tagged

73

Bird strike happens all the time - almost on a daily basis. See avherald : there are 9 instances of bird strike in the past 7 days at the time this answer is written. Usually it is ingested into the engine (which usually turns out to be a non-issue), other times it impacts the cone or leading edge of the wings or knocks off a pitot tube. While a few ...


60

The nose design of aircraft, like any other part, is a result of optimization in response to a number of factors. The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21 'Fishbed' is a supersonic, second/third generation Soviet fighter/interceptor. The first jet aircraft to enter serice during the WWII, the Messerschmitt Me 262 'Schwalbe' and Gloster Meteor had twin engines in their ...


42

The SR-71 had a detachable nose (photo #2), and could change between three different nose cones depending on the mission. I haven't found a lot of information on the three, other than what this site and this site mentions: Training nose with dead weights Radar nose containing a Side Looking Radar. This is probably the bulge you saw on the photos. Photo ...


39

A lot of early jet aircraft had the intake in the nose. Here's a few more examples: The cone in the front is required because the Mig-21 is a supersonic aircraft. The cone breaks the shockwave so that the inlet air is sub-sonic. The SR-71 is a very different type of aircraft but you can see that its engines have a very similar style of inlet:


35

The design philosophy which led away from the nose intake was to fit a powerful radar to the aircraft, which in turn was a consequence of switching from guns to air-to-air missiles as the primary armament of fighter aircraft. Most designs of the late Forties and early Fifties did not consider powerful radars in individual aircraft, but were based on ground ...


34

Because it's bloody difficult to make the curved shapes out of the materials used until recently, with the technology available at the time. The few aircraft that had it in the past generally were very expensive and labour intensive to build, compared to competitors, and therefore not economically successful. Now, with improved manufacturing techniques and ...


31

It is the avionic compartment access door as described in the Flight Crew Operating Manual! An inward-opening, manually operated, hinged door gives access to the avionics compartment. This door is in the lower fuselage, forward of the nose landing gear bay. A ladder is stowed inside the compartment adjacent to this door, which may be either be operated ...


26

If you observe the photos of the incident, you will find that the dent was in the radar dome in the nose, which is not nearly as strong as the windshield. Doesn't need to be, it isn't part of the pressurized section. Note also that the dome was not punctured, so whatever hit it was fairly blunt, like a large bird. The absence of blood on the dome is a bit ...


24

First, the Commando wasn't unique in having a 'stepless' cockpit design- the Boeing 307 Stratoliner, for example had them. Other military aircraft too had them, due to a few reasons like pressurization and the excellent visibility (He 111, Ju 388, B-29 Superfortress, the list goes on... etc) they offered. While it's true that having this design improves ...


21

(Source) That was the case on July 23, 1983 (but not quite). It was luck the manual gravity-extension didn't lock the nose gear in position. That has been attributed to the shortening of the landing roll/slide. Two factors helped avert a potential disaster: the failure of the front landing gear to lock into position during the gravity drop, and the ...


20

The answer to this is, in part to do with corporate culture and part aerodynamics. The corporate culture and history part is that Boeing have always built their noses that way and senior engineers have a tendency to return to designs they have used successfully before. If you look at the nose of a 747 and the nose of a B-17 you'll see some distinctive ...


19

This is a GPS guidance indicator from AG-NAV, with the main unit visible onboard. Snapshot from your linked video: Main unit Using the main unit, different information can be displayed on the lightbar: GPS cross-track Angle of Intercept Overlap in sprayed area Area already treated Spray height Aircraft inside/outside area indicator ... Basic data can ...


18

I'm no expert on B737 radomes, but I was able to find that these are called Lightning Diversion Strips or Lightning Diverter Strips. Since radomes are generally built with composites, they do not transmit static electricity in the same way that aluminum skin would. The B737-200 maintenance manual states that the radome is constructed of fiberglass and is ...


18

The things hanging on the left and right side of the nose are pitot covers. They cover the pitot tubes located here: (Boeing 737 Airplane Characteristics for Airport Planning) The covers are there to protect the narrow inlets from contamination or blockage: Pitot tubes are normally covered when the aircraft is parked for more than a short period of time ...


15

(Source) Externally, the Connie (shown above) had lights, with the red being the now obsolete passing light. From the high-res DC-3 and DC-7 cutaways, all sort of stuff, from autopilot oil and air filters, wiring, windshield spray systems, to hydraulic reservoirs. There wasn't one main object like there's now, nor was it completely empty. Its main ...


14

It is the intake of the jet engine which gives it that shape, a good number of earlier jet fighter planes did have that configuration. The pointed part is the shock cone for when the plane flies supersonic so that the shock would not mess with the aerodynamics of the plane especially inside the engine. Image by USAF


13

That 'hole' gives access to the avionics comparment- forward zone. The comparment has a ground access ladder, which is seen in the image. The deployment of that ladder (which is similar in A330/A340) can be seen in this video.


13

Airbus and Boeing are not the only airplane manufacturers who see the nose shape as something to sharpen their brand. Look at the Schleicher gliders (the left picture shows an ASW-20) and compare their pointed nose to those of Schempp-Hirth, which is distinctively more blunt (the right picture shows a Discus). The shorter nose will incur higher induced ...


12

Blow-molded canopies (like the acrylic one on the P-51D) were relatively expensive in the late WWII and early post-War periods when the early-modern airliners were designed. Cost is an important factor in airliner design, and was even in 1950. Additional cost factors (contributing to the high cost of deeply or compound curved windshields) are that the ...


11

A lot of supersonic aircraft of the era had the same kind of intake, the English Electic Lightning off the top of my head: EE Lightning F6 'XS904 / BQ' by Alan Wilson is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 The cone is to slow down the supersonic airflow, so that the air is relatively calm when it goes into the turbine, which ensures a smooth burn. It's in the nose ...


10

To my knowledge, no established procedures exist for any contemporary civilian airliner that would land with any gear up to decrease landing distance. However, contrary to other answers/comments, in some aircraft (among others, the B737 NG, check out http://www.b737.org.uk/landinggear.htm for a picture of the manual extension panel) it is POSSIBLE to ...


9

To be extremely simple without going into too much technical design theroy. It allows the engine to breath at high speeds. You will notice that in front of a high speed fan or a cooler it will be extremely difficult for you to breath, try putting your head out of the car and breath when travelling at 60mph , it will be much more difficult to breath ...


9

The statement is only true if you fly at a speed below the best glide speed. For simplicity, let's look at a glider: Below you see the plot of the L/D ratio over speed of the DG-1000 two-seater glider: Glide ratio over speed diagram for three different wing loadings (source). If we just look at the lowest wing loading (leftmost curve), the best L/D can be ...


9

Yes, it moves forward as the speed increases. Its purpose is "to slow the flow of air from supersonic flight speed to a subsonic speed before it enters the engine." From Wikipedia: The air flow to the engine is regulated by an inlet cone in the air intake. On early model MiG-21s, the cone has three positions. For speeds up to Mach 1.5 the cone is ...


8

Aerial dusting navigation can follow differently formatted routes, the most common being the racetrack. Take a plot of land of irregular format, place both straightaways of an oval racetrack on top of it and every pass is one wingspan to the right or left of the previous one. Basically, you must know at all times if you are flying straight and the same ...


7

It is a Pitot tube. It is used to measure some air data values, depending on the model. The most basic will measure only pressures (and then "derives" the velocity of the aircraft), the most advanced will measure angle of attack and sideslip as well. The one in the photo is particularly long to make sure that is measuring values in the undisturbed airflow ...


7

You are right, the horizontal tail of a conventional airplane appears to have a higher incidence, but the actual angle of attack is smaller than that of the wing. The wing, flying ahead of the tail, produces downwash, so the flow at the tail location has a distinct downward component. The downwash angle can be calculated from the lift coefficient and the ...


7

A radome, or nose cone, is essentially a structural cover serving a different purpose than the fuselage. These are made separate because they a special material invisible to the radar mounted beneath them. They are different shapes or sizes depending on the customer specific component they cover (radar antennas) and can be easily removed or replaced. The ...


7

As commented, reducing speed (and replanning flight) is all there is to it. From the Concorde abnormal procedures: The nose has three positions: Up 5° down 12.5° down Holding the nose at 12.5° requires hydraulic pressure. If hydraulic pressure is lost, the crew can manually release the two uplocks, and the nose (and visor) would fall and stop at the 5° ...


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