33

The most obvious thing to me would be to just talk to them: Medevac 123, this is the Diamond on base for 31, do you need to expedite your departure? If they say no, then just continue and land as normal. If they say yes, then I'd get out of their way: Medevac 123, roger, we'll extend our base and fly a wide upwind to let you out I wouldn't worry ...


29

NO! An uncontrolled field is just that - uncontrolled. No pilot will accept a clearance in uncontrolled airspace in the first place. Consider the legal consequences if two aircraft were to collide as a result of a "clearance" issued by you. Since the aircraft are in uncontrolled airspace, it is the responsibility of the pilots to make sure they do not get ...


24

I will answer this for the regulations and general procedures in the USA as laid out by the FAA, operations may vary elsewhere in the world. AOPA publishes a nice guide on how traffic flow at un-towered/un-controlled fields works and I would advise giving it a read as it covers a wide variety of scenarios. Effectively planes self announce and monitor radio ...


19

In the past when airport owners want to control traffic flow, they file a NOTAM that the airport is closed, and contact xxx at 123456789 for exceptions. Then for the takeoff, the airport manager would issue a verbal "the airport is open for N1234 to depart" and then close the airport. This could be done on the unicom, in person, via telephone or however one ...


13

The key point is in your last sentence: In the case of class G airspace from the ground, the airspace is uncontrolled. Uncontrolled airspace is, well, uncontrolled. An appropriately rated, current pilot, in an appropriately equipped aircraft, may fly IFR in class G airspace without either a clearance or a flight plan. There are no clearances to waive ...


13

Moffett Field is a federal airport (requires permission) owned by NASA and has a wide ranging number of traffic patterns/approaches available. In answer to your question, you may be seeing what is called an "Overhead" approach. This is a VFR maneuver quite common at military bases and usually consists of the following: Airplane approaches the runway in ...


12

You're almost certainly talking about a UNICOM operator, who is just an airport (FBO) employee who gives information to pilots on their request. The FAA's Pilot Handbook says: UNICOM is a nongovernment air/ground radio communication station which may provide airport information at public use airports where there is no tower or FSS. On pilot request, ...


12

See AC 90-66A - RECOMMENDED ‘STANDARD TRAFFIC PATTERNS AND PRACTICES FOR AERONAUTICAL OPERATIONS AT AIRPORTS WITHOUT OPERATING CONTROL TOWERS for information about uncontrolled airport traffic patterns. It includes the following which says that while the FAA recommends using the full pattern, it is not required: 7. GENERAL OPERATING PRACTICES. a. ...


12

Nontowered airports absolutely can have ILS approaches, and it's fairly common, though of course not as common as at towered fields. Two examples in my neck of the woods are KIKK (Kankakee, IL) and KMTO (Mattoon, IL). Also, at many towered airports, the tower is not 24/7 and closes at night. If such an airport has an ILS, it's still available after the ...


11

This answer is specific to the United States (heck, I don't know if this is an even an issue elsewhere in the world). The airspace classification actually has nothing to do with whether or not a particular airport has a precision approach. It is based on two factors: communications capability and weather observations. For a non-towered airport to have ...


11

In the U.S., taxiway number/nomenclature is generally designed in accordance with FAA AC 150/5340-18F. Also, Engineering Brief 89 available here clarifies some of the information in the AC with respect to taxiway numbering/nomenclature. The two pages shown below summarize the guidelines for numbering (from Engineering Brief 89) Also, note the general ...


10

Your example is too specific to be useful to others, so let's consider the general case instead. At an untowered field there is no "active" runway - they're all active. There is usually a "preferred" runway - the one best aligned into the wind - but any runway can be used by any aircraft at any time, subject to whatever safety considerations the pilots ...


10

As PIC if you don't feel comfortable entering congested airspace at a beehive airport, dont enter it. It's that simple. Divert to another airfield and attempt to return to the original airfield when the congestion abates. If you anticipate high density traffic at an untowered airport, you should let other pilots know your intentions on the CTAF well in ...


9

Without a control tower, the field would be "uncontrolled" in the eyes of the FAA, so no, you couldn't issue clearances per se. The FAA would probably take a dim view of an untrained individual playing air traffic controller at his private field. That said, the field would still be private property, and you'd be within your rights to bar anyone whom you ...


9

Dave's answer is good. I would like to provide a shorter and simpler answer here without references to external sources. First, the radio. Get on the radio, and tell everybody three things: Who you are Where you are What you are doing For example, N1234 is 6 miles SE, inbound for downwind runway 33 Then, you listen to others. It is as simple as that. ...


9

My GPS tells me the distance. Otherwise, my experience says: 15 miles (and about 3,000 AGL) is where I'm not entirely sure I have the airport picked out. 10 miles is where I can see the airport, but not pick out specific details and airplanes. 5 miles is where I can see the airport clearly, and setup for the centerline.


9

It is the advice of the FAA that you should be looking out the window quite a bit when VFR in the pattern. According to this AC related to traffic patterns: Collision Avoidance. The pilot in command’s (PIC) primary responsibility is to see and avoid other aircraft and to help them see and avoid his or her aircraft. Keep lights and strobes on. The use ...


8

If you are confused somehow about your situation over an airport, and there are other aircraft around, head for empty sky away from the airport beyond the pattern/circuit and get reoriented. By empty sky, I mean if you think somebody might be nearby and you aren't sure where they are and don't have them in sight, identify a patch of sky where they're not, ...


7

As far as I'm aware there's no specific regulation that requires a control tower to be established. FAR 170 and the regs referenced therein set out when an airport becomes eligible for a tower, but nothing requires an eligible field to have a control tower (in fact the FAA won't establish a tower unless someone gives them the land). That said it would ...


7

I'd like to answer your question with a short example. A few days ago I flew to Venice (untowered) and decided to make a teardrop entry to set up for the 45. My calls were 10 and 5 miles out, both ending with "any traffic please advise." Guess what I saw overtaking me on my 4 o'clock position only a few hundred feet away at same altitude (500 feet above ...


7

Not at all - they'll be built-up in a logical fashion in so much as they're not just randomly assigned but there's no standard beyond the use of letters to denote taxiways and numbers to denote holds. Each airport is free to "make up" it's pattern of taxiways and exits as it sees fit, and many will evolve and grow over time. For example, at Birmingham ...


6

It is legal. The left downwind pattern entry at a 45 degree angle is recommended in the AIM to standardize operations and is therefore not regulatory in nature. However, the reason it's not a particularly good idea is that not all aircraft are required to have radios at a non-towered airport. A traffic pattern is quite small compared to the en route phase ...


6

Nobody on the radio does NOT mean no traffic. You have IFR Arrivals not yet released by approach to tower frequency, and you have 100% legal no radio aircraft. Fly the pattern so that they know where to look for you!


6

Quoted from the Instrument Procedures Handbook, page 4-6: APPROACH CLEARANCE The approach clearance provides guidance to a position from where you can execute the approach, and it also clears you to fly that approach. If only one approach pro- cedure exists, or if ATC authorizes you to execute the approach procedure of your choice, the ...


6

There's no specific rule against it, so whether it should be a violation is a matter of opinion. FWIW, AOPA's legal counsel believes it isn't a violation per se, but the FAA has still pursued action against airmen for doing it. The 'obvious' regulation involved is 91.13: (a) Aircraft operations for the purpose of air navigation. No person may operate an ...


5

The FAA gives funds to airports through the Airport Improvement Program (AIP) and that could include runway improvements. It's public money so the information is also public and should be in the Excel files on that page. If that isn't what you need, you can always submit an FOIA request to the FAA for all information they have about the airport. It's also ...


5

By the legend, that should be "Class E Airspace with floor 700 ft. above surface that laterally abuts 1200ft or higher Class E Airspace"


4

This is complex and unfortunately can create a dangerous situation. I fly out of KDYL and have seen a similar situation occur. Generally what I see is not that the wind changes but that there is no wind so both directions are used. The fact of the matter is, at an untowered airport the runway choice is up to you unless specific conditions are specified in ...


4

Let's say an IFR flight was planned to depart from a non-towered airport with class G airspace extending from the surface to 700 feet AGL. The flight visibility and ceiling both go down to 0. Can the pilot get an IFR clearance? Yes. The ATC clearance will use the words "when entering controlled airspace"... Is it legal to takeoff from a Class G airport ...


4

Reference 47 CFR 87.213. Attempting to direct air traffic via Unicom is illegal, I would report that. (c) Unicoms must not be used for air traffic control (ATC) purposes other than to relay ATC information between the pilot and air traffic controller. Relaying of ATC information is limited to the following: Revisions of proposed departure time; ...


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