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5

You've got the heading right. Now rotate the whole view of both instruments to the aircraft orientation, and you see the direction in which the Relative Bearing Indicator (RBI) points. Now it's easy to place it onto the correct position on the card. The RBI points towards the beacon, but does so relative to the aircraft The dial with the compass in the ...


5

"Omnidirectional" may not be the most descriptive word for the actual radio signal emitted by a VOR, as contrasted with the signal from a NDB. We could note that a VOR and a NDB actually both share the characteristic of broadcasting in all directions, as opposed to the narrow beam emitted by a landing approach aid, or the characteristic pattern emitted by ...


4

Think of an NDB as dropping a small pebble in an otherwise still/static mass of water like a lake. It generates ripples that expand radially from the point in which you dropped the pebble, in the shape of a circle. If you see the ripples, by judging in which direction they move, you can determine where they come from and all you know is that if you follow ...


4

The ADF consists of two antennas: the loop and the sense antenna. We already have an excellent answer by mins on how the ADF works, so I'm not going to repeat it here. The important thing for this question is the pattern of the two antennas: (modified from source) As you can see, the sense antenna has a spherical pattern and therefore sees the same signal ...


4

ANT mode improves the audio reception when listening to a station's morse code identifier or whatever else is being broadcast. Normally the directional needle gets parked at 3 o'clock when in ANT. NDBs can also have other broadcasts besides station ident, like ATIS or AWOS weather data, etc., and in some cases use of ANT may make the difference between ...


4

It's just a manual compass card (or some call it a heading ring), not an "omnidirectional bearing". The ADF needle just points to the station (NDB or AM radio station) relative to the airplane; that's it that's all. If the needle's at 9 o'clock, the station is off your left wing. The compass card is just a reference device to provide a mental ...


3

I think the figure is just intended to illustrate the bearing to the NDB relative to the aircraft, and not the magnetic heading of the airplane. So when they give you your magnetic heading of 160, you're still using the bearing of 045 relative to your aircraft, which gives 205 magnetic.


2

To add to @quiet flyer's answer, the practical result is: With Non Directional you only know the radio aid's bearing from the aircraft's longitudinal axis and not the aid's geographic orientation to the aircraft's position (until you mentally work it out). With Omnidirectional, you only know the aircraft's geographic orientation to the radio aid's ...


2

Normally "Compass Locator Beacons" were co-located with the outer marker for ILS approaches. A "compass locator beacon" is an NDB beacon specifically to drive the radio compass. A radio compass was a lot simpler instrument than the ADF that worked off of the NDB beacons. Typically it just had a needle that pointed left/right to direct the pilot to turn ...


2

You are right, the correct answer should be C. Those two bearings are reciprocals of each other. Being 180 degrees out from each other, the lines are parallel. Parallel lines never intersect, so the only way that you can be on both at the same time if is they are overlaid on the same track; I.e. a single straight line between the two points. If you had ...


2

If the RBI is of the fixed card variety, the N is not indicative of North. It only indicates the direction the nose of the aircraft is pointing. You can actually dispense with the cardinal direction letters and just focus on the bearing numbers. If the exact bearing is not needed (in this case, it is not), use the RBI to indicate clock direction from your ...


1

The gyro on the left gives you the orientation of the aicraft and the RBI arrow gives you the direction of the beacon relative to your aircraft. First one, you have the aircraft facing south and in the aircraft the beacon is at your right (3 o'clock). Second one you are flying east and the beacon is at your 10 o'clock. In order to fly directly to the beacon ...


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Manual tuning is like the old style analogue radios with a dial or rolling switch for tuning, similar to old AM/FM radios in your car, etc. Old Automatic Direction Finder (ADF) systems still have a tuning knob that does the same thing. BFO stands for Beat Frequency Oscillator. There is a bit of electrickery going on, but basically, the ADF radio receiver ...


1

My understanding was that a VOR was not a series of different signals being sent out in narrow cone shapes. I understood VORs to be just a few signals being sent out to include the station identifier, an optional voice signal, a reference signal, and a variable phase signal, as well as some other discrete signals. The navigation part is done by sending out ...


1

MB=RB+MH for fixed card ADF. as shown here Airplane now heading 160 from north " nose of airplane " relative heading now is 45 from heading of airplane " from nose " it means station is located 45 degrees from your heading which is 160 degrees north so the magnetic bearing to the station equals 160+45=205 hope it helps


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