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Your question I cannot find information from [Shanwick Oceanic Control and Gander Oceanic Control] What are their websites? Direct answer ATC centers have no public websites in general. Aeronautical information is distributed by a fixed dedicated network, the aeronautical fixed service (AFS) and its data network AFTN. From ICAO North Atlantic ...


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This guy has a 365 day history online. You could contact him for older values. You can also get some history using Archive.org.


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There is no equivalent in Europe to the North Atlantic Routes, you simply file direct from point to point. This is the routing for a flight on Wednesday 18th of January, 2017 (DAL4). KJFK MERIT HFD PUT WITCH ALLEX N263A JOOPY NATS RESNO NATS NETKI NIBOG REMSI UL603 SOGPO UT149 OTSOP T149 LIPMI T150 ROLIS EDDF You see that the route terminates NAT S at ...


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Think of 30W as a kind of traffic marker for flight planning. If your planned route is going to cross 30W before the tracks activate (that is, ahead of the traffic flow), then you can file "random route." If you're crossing 30W during the active period, then you have to file on one of the tracks unless you can climb above them before crossing the entry fix. ...


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There will be no exemptions for the CPDLC rule in the North Atlantic Track area. The Datalink Mandate will be implemented: starting 5 February 2015: FL350 to FL390 (inclusive) on all tracks within the NAT Organized Track System (OTS) starting 7 December 2017: FL350 to FL390 (inclusive) throughout the ICAO NAT region. starting 30 January 2020: FL290 and ...


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You can find the routes them selves here, the start and end points are noted like other airway intersections by phonetic names. You can look up the names here (use world hi maps to see them) for exact locations. For example you can see a route start at TUDEP and if you take a look on SkyVector you will find (lat/long in the top corner):


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Overall facts behind the NAT OTS: There are strong winds in altitude over the Atlantic Ocean (jet streams), including the northern polar jet stream over the North Atlantic Ocean, which is blowing from west to east. Airlines try to take benefit of these tailwinds when flying from NA to Europe, and they try to find routes with the weakest headwind velocity ...


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