26

They have seats for couriers, same as factory freighters, but roomier. Note: From the -400BCF type certificate: There are no provisions for the carriage of passengers. A maximum of 19 couriers can occupy the aft cabin of the upper deck as defined in AFM. Source: airplane-pictures.net Above is the upper deck of a -400BCF (converted freighter). And ...


22

The answer to both of your questions is "yes". The FAA ordered, in effect, the installation of "Cooper Vanes" and did do so in 1972. The reason you could not find the answer may have been that the modifications were not called "Cooper Vanes" by the FAA and nor was the FAA targeting the 727 specifically. Instead they addressed ventral and tailcone exits on ...


17

UPDATE 9/4/2017 I'm thrilled this post has been so helpful for so many people. As such, I wanted to update it with more details and more current links in case people are interested. Enjoy! You could have a lot of fun, and get a lot out of reviewing the footage of your lessons. I'd look into a suction cup mount as you are already considering. When buying a ...


11

This is covered by 14 CFR 91.203: §91.203 Civil aircraft: Certifications required. ... (c) No person may operate an aircraft with a fuel tank installed within the passenger compartment or a baggage compartment unless the installation was accomplished pursuant to part 43 of this chapter, and a copy of FAA Form 337 authorizing that ...


6

Pressurization is primarily for crew and passenger comfort. The B307 was a very early attempt at cabin pressurization and the marginal pressurization differential of only 2.4 psi did not allow much of an increase in cruising altitude. The difference between 8,000’ and 12,000’ did not really justify the added expense and weight. When the B307s were ...


6

Well, pretty much anything can be given a US airworthiness certificate provided it's not literally falling to pieces. You could certificate such an aircraft as a Special Airworthiness Certificate in the Experimental category -- Specifically one of: Experimental -- Research and Development To conduct aircraft operations as a matter of research or to ...


5

As long as there are load-bearing structures beneath the fiber (I don't know how strong that fiber is so I will assume it is fabric-like), it will most likely fly if designed properly. If the fiber is smooth, it shouldn't be much different than regular fabric or other composite skins. And yes, there are plenty of sailplanes that self launch with electric or ...


5

Yes, a private jet could be based on the design of the SR-71, but there would have to be a market for it. Considering how expensive it would be to produce, operate, and maintain, no one would want to buy it, so it will never happen.


4

Android by default has Google Now enables, which include voice search. Voice search listens for the words "Ok Google" when you speak, but phones also detect a long press in a headphone button (on headphones with controls). It can also be fooled into activating by odd signals like the pop when you turn on the avionics master switch or loud droning noises like ...


3

Not practically speaking no. With sufficient engineering data you could perform calculations to come up with a model for what the additive effects would be of the various modifications. The problem with the aerodynamics to horsepower relationship is that almost all of the basic calculations have exponents. So a mod that gives you 5 knots over a given '...


2

Android by default has Google Now installed. Voice search listens for the words "Ok Google" when you speak, but phones also detect a long press in a headphone button (on headphones with controls). It can also be fooled into activating by odd signals like the pop when you turn on the avionics master switch or loud droning noises like motorcycle and airplane ...


2

The Avia (now LOM) M132 4 cylinder inverted inline might fit. Some adaptation work is probably required.


2

The idea is good in concept but it would be pretty difficult to match the rpms to the actuual ground speed, in fact if the wheel was spinning faster it would actually wear the tyre more! Another factor is that aircraft wheels often do not hit the runway straight on. In a crosswind situation they could be off a few degrees so the tyre would still scrub. ...


2

The cost of approving an STC for an aircraft can be quite expensive and the return on investment may not have been worth it. ------------------------------------------ |Aircraft | # Built | Year Certified | ------------------------------------------ |Learjet 23 | 104 | 1964 | |Learjet 24 | 259 | 1966 to 1976 | (All variants) |...


1

Since this is an aircraft for personal use, is under 19,000lbs gross weight, and less than 19 seats it will fall under Part 23. If you don't plan on selling "kits" to do these modifications, then an STC is not required. STC's are only for modifications intended for sale to aircraft for installation by an A&P mechanic. STC's are required not for the kit ...


1

You will most likely need a Supplemental Type Certificate from EASA According to their FAQ, emphasis mine: My aircraft has been modified in the USA by Form 337 action. Can EASA accept this? Answer EASA accepts alterations on non-critical components that are substantiated via Form 337, as detailed in the EASA-FAA Technical Implementation ...


1

I'm just making this up as I go along, so your mileage may vary. Also I'm only dealing with the drag-reducing mods. It seems this method ought to give a conservative estimate of the combined speed gains. For each mod, seperately, calculate a "drag coefficient reduction factor" equal to stock airspeed squared divided by promised airspeed squared. The ...


1

No there isn't. The closest thing would be a Fairchild Ranger inverted in-line 6, almost as old and 70 lbs heavier and I don't think it's ever been tried. The DHC-1 Chipmunk, DeHavilland Canada's first in-house design (and later license built by mother DH in UK), also used the Major, and a lot of them have been modified with opposed Lycomings, but I can't ...


1

If the aircraft you import to the US was certified by country that the US has a aviation bilateral agreement with (https://www.faa.gov/aircraft/air_cert/international/bilateral_agreements/baa_basa_listing/) your ability to import the aircraft would be improved and much easier because the BASA (Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement) among many things recognizes ...


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