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13

I have no medical degree, but I can give you some things to consider: Even as a hobby, flying is at times a high stress environment. You must stay alert at all times, and the ability to maintain functionality even when all hell breaks loose is highly desirable. It's not all clear blue skies and three degrees of freedom. You got checkrides, new things to ...


9

We aren't medical professionals here, and no Aviation Medical Examiner (AME) posts on this board as far as we know. The best answer is to schedule an appointment with an AME and have him review your case. If the answer is "yes" you can get the medical, this is a cost you'll be paying anyway (and I'd suspect that is the answer you're likely to get). ...


8

You don’t say where you are, so I’ll answer for the US. If you’re somewhere else, the answer may or may not be similar. The FAA has a dim view of mental health issues requiring any medication. They are rightly concerned about the issue being treated and what may happen if you stop taking the drugs, and they’re also concerned about the possible side effects, ...


7

Things change. Recently an airline captain who is insulin dependent, flew with a First Class special issuance medical. At this moment, there are six airmen in the US who have First Class special issuance for insulin dependent diabetes. I suggest that your friend may want to re-investigate his obtaining a medical. The guidance for third class is here: https:...


4

Other answers have given you a flat statement about how this applies to a PPL. I'm going to slightly frame-challenge your question though. Why are you looking at a PPL as the only type of aviation? I used to fly hang-gliders. Learning to fly hang-gliders and paragliders does require some minimum physical fitness, and for you to be mentally able to learn the ...


4

The same reason they take down your eye color, height, weight, sex, race, etc. They’re just general stats for identification.


4

What makes you think you need to inform the FAA of your status? I know of no rule that requires notifying the FAA until you go for your next medical. The FAA has a list of disqualifying medical conditions, and hernias aren’t among them. They do recommend that you not fly for 5-times the maximal hour dose interval after taking certain medications, but ...


4

There are Aviation Medical Examiners (AMEs) who specialize in special issuance medicals. It is probably best to use one of them instead of your regular AME. This type of special issuance may require a battery of psychological tests and it may get expensive. But the good news is that once he has his special issuance, he can fly under Basic Med, so he only has ...


4

In the US, the department of commerce had an Aeronautics Branch. It was first responsible for civil aviation safety. On February 28, 1927 it published a list of the first physicians, who were qualified to give medical examinations for pilot licenses. On December 31, 1926, the Aeronautics Branch issued the first air commerce regulations, that included ...


4

Certainly not. Eyeglasses can't fix everything. Some people have very poor vision even after correction with glasses. One example out of many, would be someone suffering from macular degeneration.


3

In response to two NTSB safety recommendations, the FAA stated that it has only identified three accidents involving pilots with valid medical qualifications in which color vision deficiency (CVD) was cited as a contributing cause. As you mention above, on July 26, 2002, a Federal Express Boeing 727-200F crashed during a visual approach to Tallahassee ...


3

It depends on the country you are going to take the medical examination. Normally, the national civil aviation authorities of each European country will have this listing. For instance, in Spain, AESA publishes here the approved medical centers where applicants can take their initial and successive examinations. So I suggest to first find out the authority ...


2

Basics : Why did the event happen? Will it happen again? Curative care is fine, but what about the possibility of the same, or similar, events happening tomorrow/next month/ad astra? The FAA medical standards are for the protection of everyone other than the pilot. I am the proud owner of 6 cardiac stents. But it has become impossible to maintain a ...


2

This can be difficult to answer, but I'll try from a US/FAA perspective. Military Service If you want to become a military pilot you cannot have any history of mental or psychological disorder This is from the perspective of starting out to become a military pilot. If you are already a military pilot and have some kind of mental/psychological issue that you ...


2

The first class medical vision requirements are in 14 CFR 67.103 (emphasis mine): Eye standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) Distant visual acuity of 20/20 or better in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses. If corrective lenses (spectacles or contact lenses) are necessary for 20/20 vision, the person may ...


2

According to 67.107 which is the guideline for AME's for mental issues, depression is not listed as a reason for automatic denial for first-class medical certificates. The issue with depression comes in when you are on medication to control it, as many antidepressants are considered "do not fly". It isn't impossible though even with medication and treatment,...


2

The simplest way to answer this is to have your friend call an AME in the city they intend on training and ask them if they feel they will pass the required medical for a CPL. AME's are pretty forthcoming about this kind of stuff and they will often give you an idea over the phone if they feel there is a real issue. AME's are also the ONLY people that can ...


2

FAA Regulations for First Class airmen describe the medical requirements for ear-nose-throat related conditions in §67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: ... (b) No disease or condition of the middle or internal ear, nose, oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx ...


2

The FAA bases their eyesight limitations on total acuity and not on diopter correction strength. Although many people equate these as being the same thing, they are not. Diopter correction is based on focal length. How well an image is focused onto the retina of your eye. An image not being focused on the retina is usually due to a distortion of the cornea....


2

I speak not as a medic but as someone who has a history of depression. One thing to consider is, do you drive? Have you ever had to pull to the side of the road as the result of a panic attack? You can't pull over when you're flying a plane. Did you ever run into the back of the car in front when it stopped unexpectedly at a junction? Was it because your ...


1

As Stephen said, you are good as long as your Med cert was not revoked, suspended, or declined upon renewal. A medical of any type is the requirement. That being said, you had a first class certificate with third class privileges.


1

Your first-class medical certificate issued in May 2005 granted, since you were under 40 at the time: First class privileges until May 31, 2006 Second class privileges until May 31, 2006 Third-class privileges until May 31, 2010 Since that last date is after July 14, 2006, then assuming it expired valid and you have not applied for another medical ...


1

(My answer is limited to carriers based in the USA, things can be very different in other regions, many countries pay monthly salary and culturally have different view of company expectation verses safety expectation) Pilots are paid per hour of block time, they are getting paid for all that time waiting on the taxiway after leaving the gate and starting an ...


1

There is a list of UK Aeromedical centres is available on the Apply for a Class 1 medical certificate page on the CAA website (I'll include a copy of it as soon as I've worked out how to post a table here)


1

So the FAA says explicitly you're grounded until YOU are cleared by a doctor's notice. They didn't (unless you forgot to mention that) that you need to notify them of such a notice. So unless the information you provide is incomplete you are cleared to fly again starting February 2020. To make sure you ticked all the boxes I would at least until your next ...


1

I piloted 4 hour flights without much physical issue. There was noticable mental fatigue as they were single pilot operations with a complex flight plan, having a copilot will help a lot with that part. Pilot seats are much better than passenger seats, both in basic shape and adjustment. Pilots also have rudder pedals and many hand controls so there is ...


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