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144

From the flightradar24 playback, it appears to have been an encounter with Etihad Airways 171. Your flight (Alaska) was at FL360, while the opposing was at FL370. Therefore, there was 1000 feet of vertical separation between them, which is typically considered safe when operating with RVSM, Reduced Vertical Separation Minima rules (see other answers). I ...


56

Fighter jets are very maneuverable, so they may make anything from a shallow bank to a breakaway maneuver. The breakaway is a standard way for fighter jets to exit a formation. It provides a way to safely and quickly gain separation from the other aircraft. In this case the bank is fairly shallow, but when the aircraft disconnects they are already in a ...


50

It's unlikely. Because of RVSM, Reduced Vertical Separation Minima rules, the vertical distance between airplanes passing each other is only 1000 ft. If you were in the flight deck so you could see out front, you'd be having a wonderful time freaking out because airplanes on the same airway pass above and below going the other direction only 1000 ft away. ...


45

Doesn't really look all that aggressive to me, either way the fighter and the tanker are very vulnerable while refueling. Usually there is more than one aircraft waiting to refuel, so the goal of this game is to run as many of the aircraft in formation through refueling as quickly as possible. In order to do that, you need to get your wake out of the way ...


18

There is no difference aerodynamically. The only difference is in intention and presence of the wind. The airplane does not care about the ground track, all it feels is the movement through the air. Both side- and forward-slip make the airplane fly slightly sideways through the air, somewhere in the direction between nose and downwards pointing wing. If ...


16

Different air forces may operate with different conventions, but right from basic flight training the RAF classifies banked turns of 20 degrees as "gentle," 40 as "medium" and 60 as "steep," and the most commonly used are "medium". Ref: The RAF Basic Flying Manual (1952 edition) - https://www.t6harvard.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Chapter-3.pdf page 26-27....


11

The Etihad flight was a 777, which is a much larger aircraft, but of almost the same proportions as the 737. Also living near an airport, I am well familiar with how difficult it is to gauge altitude. You see airplanes apparently moving at quite different speeds; actually a "slow" plane is moving at a similar speed but is larger and farther away. It's ...


9

They do this because there are 3 main parts to an air to air refuel: port observation where they wait to be refueled in a line. refuel area where they actually get refueled. reform area where they wait for the rest of the squadron. After the refuel, they will bank the right to go to the reform area and will wait for the rest of there squadron. Once ...


8

Yes, that is correct. Moving any control surface until you hit the stops is considered "full deflection". For the purpose of maneuvering speed, this is the speed at which any single control surface can be fully deflected without risking damage to the control surface or structure. Pitch is full back/forward on the yoke or stick, which is where the elevator ...


7

In Scenario A there is no obvious answer. You take whatever action is necessary to avoid a collision. If this were a controlled airfield there would be questions raised to the ground controller. If not, similar questions would be directed at the pilot entering a runway without notifying anyone. Even at a completely deserted airfield without any form of ...


7

The flight was on the 28th, and before orbiting it was around 12:00 UTC. By using the playback function of FR24, this is the view: The flight in question was 2383 with call-sign WZZ1161 (FlightAware permalink). The boxes with numbers and arrows indicate the flight level and either climbing or descending. As you can see, two busy streams were approaching ...


7

A jet joins on one side of the tanker then when its turn comes moves behind to tank then when finished, clears off to the other side. Bear in mind a whole formation may be tanking and need to flow through the same process. The turn after tanking is not a hard turn in fast jet terms.


6

The difference is in application. First, the forward slip (my favorite). The inputs (for a 172) are full rudder and opposite aileron as needed to hold straight path. This is cross controlled, but safe if you maintain a healthy margin above stall. I did mine at 65 knots. The purpose is to increase drag, producing a faster rate of descent for a given ...


6

In a steep turn you are making power changes, pitch changes and also making constant corrections with aileron to hold the bank angle, without even realizing it. Once established in the turn some airplanes require a bit of in-turn aileron to hold the bank angle, some hold the bank with neutral aileron, and some require top aileron to keep from overbanking. ...


6

A possibly surprising result is even airplanes as different as a humble Cessna 152 and a Boeing 747, if able to fly the same speed in the same conditions, would use the same pivotal altitude. The airplane’s velocity and acceleration due to gravity are the only factors in determining pivotal altitude. Detailed derivations by John S. Denker and by ...


6

Scenario A: It all boils down to remaining distance available until impact and aircraft performance. If you are in a commercial airliner you normally only have the option to abort. Your take-off performance calculation is normally optimized for the minimum power to get off the ground while staying safely within all applicable limits. Saves fuel and engine ...


5

Others seem to have answered the why such a sharp maneuver part of the question, so I will answer the why to the right part. Collision avoidance in aircraft is always by turning to the right when possible. Keeping the formation in such a way that the pilot can always escape to the right is probably done to ensure safety, as it lines up with the engrained ...


5

Sideslip and forward slip are actually the same thing. They are both intentional cross controlled, unbalanced flight. The only difference is where the runway is oriented with respect to the aircraft's attitude, and the reason for executing the slip. In what is being called a "forward slip", (used to lose altitude without gaining airspeed) the winds are ...


4

It is important to realize the "ball" is simply rolling back and forth in a curved glass tube to indicate the direction of net G forces. It is also known as an inclinometer. What is happening in your steep turn is the elevator/wing orientation is now at an angle to gravity, so pulling "up" also tightens your turn radius, forcing the "ball" to the outside. ...


4

Forward and Side-slips are not quite the same although they are very similar. When a plane is put into a slip it tries to roll out of the slip. For example if I apply right rudder this puts me in a left slip (relative wind hits the airplane from the left) and the plane will try to roll right. This is called slip-roll coupling. Also the slip will try and ...


4

Forward slip and side slip are the same. It's just the objective, degree of control input, and alignment of the nose is different. Forward slips are to lose altitude. Side slips are to compensate for lateral drift while landing. In a forward slip your path through the air is more or less the same as before you started the slip. In a side slip your path ...


4

One reason that comes to mind is as you get closer to the coffin corner, the extra G force due to maneuvering could cause a stall. Quoting from "Stall the Pig", In the thin air at altitude, jets operate within a very narrow airspeed band between MMO (redline) and the low-speed limit, typically a yellow arc that provides a warning zone prior to a ...


4

The maneuvering speed is the maximum calibrated airspeed at which - starting from straight and level flight - you can safely move any single flight control from the neutral position to the maximum deflection possible at that airspeed. What constitutes full deflection varies from aircraft to aircraft, and also - frequently - with airspeed. At low speeds, it ...


4

At the time WZZ1161 / W62383 arrived at Palma de Mallorca (PMI), it was rush hour. To sequence the aircraft for final approach, Air Traffic Control usually give aircraft vectors (headings) to increase their path lenght so that they line up with the runway at the right time, with the appropriate amount of spacing from the preceding aircaft. In case of peak ...


3

A) I would reject the takeoff as (I assume this is a light GA aircraft) the stopping distance is likely to be short, more specifically shorter than the distance required to continue takeoff. If you are at or very close to rotation speed it might be better to continue. B) You should stay put. The runway is occupied and the other aircraft should go around. If ...


3

Two aircraft must either be flying in formation, or be far apart, to be safe. While the fighter is in the process of leaving the tanker, it is neither. It therefore moves away quickly using the standard breakaway manoeuvre. Bank really sharply? The video showed a positively leisurely turn in the circumstances. Why to the right? It's standard to approach on ...


2

By flying straight up before exceeding Mach 1, to spread the boom more widely. The commentary says: at 2:10, "pull up" and the smoke trail suddenly points upwards; "[2:16] subsonic below thirty thousand feet," "point zero nine Mach [for?]ty thousand [feet?], thump, copy one point zero nine Mach, more thumps, [2:39] one point zero eight Mach." In the dive ...


2

The simplest explanation is that when Langewiesche says "it will stall... out of level flight with cruising throttle", he is describing a situation where the aircraft is still banked, with insufficient power to maintain a constant airspeed, and the pilot is continually moving the stick or yoke further and further aft to maintain altitude, bringing the ...


2

The maneuver tests the ability of the pilot to hold precise altitude and airspeed. You need to make constant small corrections when flying into and away from the wind. In my opinion, it is the most difficult of the Commercial maneuvers. Garry Wing has a good explanation of the technique. As Garry Wing explained in the video. If you don’t hold precise ...


1

The only published Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STARs) over Menorca are coming from the RIXOT and MORSS waypoints as shown in the following Jeppesen chart: It looks like your plane was coming in from RIXOT (where it should have been at FL230 or below). The only published holding is over the Capdepera VOR (CDP), but your plane was circling before ...


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