44

There is actually some data (albeit limited) on this scenario: On August 21st 1961 this test was performed in a DC-8. When this test was performed they were supersonic for about 16 seconds which took a lot of planning to pull off. You first need to climb higher than the plane typically does to have enough altitude to pull this off, then make sure you ...


16

The TWA Flight 841 accident in 1979 involving a Boeing 727 comes pretty close to your conditions. Not a zero-G dive but an unintended spiral dive starting at 39,000 feet, reaching mach 0.96 at 31,800 feet, becoming a 90 degree nose-down dive at 29,000 feet with total loss of control authority. With speed brakes ineffective, the pilot extended the landing ...


8

That's correct. The limitations are to stay below the critical Mach Number, and altitude is used because it's easier for the pilot to monitor and reference to than temperature. The numbers are based on the standard atmosphere's temperature profile and I imagine there is some fudge factor or safety margin to allow for normal deviations from ISA. The chart ...


6

After you break the sound barrier, a shock wave will be generated in front of your main wings and tail wings. Though the design of wings on modern planes may hold that situation and can still generate some lift (which is impossible for traditional wings, leading to a fatal stall), the control surfaces on your main wings and tail wings will nearly lose their ...


5

The early series 20 Lears have always had boundary layer separation issues, so much so that any time the wings are removed and reinstalled the aircraft must be test flown. Mach tuck is an issue with all aircraft capable of trans-sonic flight, but on the early Lears this is apparently exacerbated by the susceptibility to boundary layer separation from the ...


5

Yes most aircraft which operate in the transonic zone experience a nose down pitch with increase in speed. The two main causes are : Rearward movement of centre of pressure Because of supersonic acceleration at higher speed, pressure continues to decrease past the 50% chord point, thus increasing the amount of lift produced by mid chord part of wing. ...


4

Could an airliner exceed Mach 1 in a zero-G power dive and safely recover? There is only one answer here and that is NO, especially for the A320 in your example (there are other airliners better suited to tolerate higher transonic speeds). Yes, it's possible to recover from such a condition, but nothing about it would be safe. Recovering from this ...


3

I've never heard of one, but note that the pitch down effect of Mach tuck starts below Mcrit, and below Mmo for that matter, and airliner trim systems have a "Mach Trim" function to drive the stab to counteract it. Fortunately, in the speed range of a commercial airliner, the amount of tuck is modest and it's not really a controlability issue, just an ...


2

It really depends on the aircraft. A DC-8 is known to have done this. (https://www.airspacemag.com/history-of-flight/i-was-there-when-the-dc-8-went-supersonic-27846699/) There are 2 sources of stress on the airframe in this situation- airliners aren't designed to fly past Mach 1 (except the Concorde and Tu-144...), so there's one issue. There's also the ...


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