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37

They still want to get into the low cost segment but want to market themselves differently for better penetration. You can only present so many images of a brand to customers: You can't show both the super-cheap prices with happy youth on them and posh first class at the same time. They do not want to tarnish a nice brand by mixing it with a low cost carrier ...


23

As mentioned there are lots of branding issues around this but there are also lots of corporate and legal reasons to do so. Business Isolation: If you want to start out a bunch of new routes and you are not sure how well they are going to do a large airline my not want to book that kind of loss or risk having to cover it. Thus they can incorporate a "new" ...


22

Why bus The typical reason you use a bus to your low-cost carrier (LCC) or regional jet is the cheaper 'remote stands'. But this doesn't mean the stand is necessarily closer to the runway where the planes take off and land. See: Who decides whether an airline docks at a jetbridge or parks at a remote stand? Can't be too close A big area around the runway ...


14

Volume Orders Discounts These result in significant discounts to the airline. While discounts are commonplace in the industry, Ryanair ordered 737-800 for an estimated 40-50 million dollars as compared to the list price of around 90 million dollars. With an order of that size Boeing could not risk losing it to another manufacturer, and will be satisfied ...


11

It might be that Times of India are over-reporting the actual orders. The aircraft industry has various types of orders and options. Other sources (pdxlight) say that Indigo has firm orders for 180 A320neos. If Indigo replaced their existing A320s this would represent a doubling of their fleet size - still surprising but less so than the five-fold ...


10

I would imagine this has to do with branding. Kind of like how some car companies have both "regular" and "premium" brands. Eg., Chevy v. Cadillac or VW v. Audi, etc etc. It allows for companies to have a more exclusive version of their product for people who are just the premium, exclusive sorts... Granted there are other cost considerations, and other ...


10

For the low-cost model there's an article called The true cost of flying revealed, which uses a 154-passenger A320 for its figures. According to the calculations, each passenger on board an Airbus A320, which has a capacity of 154, costs the airline $68.50 (£47.06) for the 260-mile journey. The one-hour flight costs the airline an estimated $2.50 per ...


10

The number of flight attendants required on flights are mandated by international safety regulations. For planes with up to 19 passenger seats, no flight attendant is needed. For larger planes, one flight attendant per 50 passenger seats is needed.—Wikipedia Eight cabin crew is enough. 377/50 is 7.54.


9

There are two main factors. The law One, as other answers have mentioned, is the law. There are strict regulations that cover everything in aviation, from the way people speak to the training they must have and the specifications and audit trails of almost every piece of equipment they use. Now it's true that people, especially unscrupulous ones who are ...


8

In addition to the reasons given by @aeroalias, cargo containers also waste space. From the A320/321 Operator's Manual: The A320 can hold up to 7 containers. The A319/320/321 do not use the standard LD3 containers. They use the slightly smaller AKH container. Each of these has a volume of 3.7 m3, so seven of them totals 25.9 m3. When bulk loaded the A320 ...


7

Legally, you would need to find a seat that passed the FAA's 16 G "side facing" requirements. The AC that covers the 16G rule has some text that may be of interest on this matter. The FAA admits that its an ongoing area of research and that currently special tests need to be undertaken to certify one. (bolded for emphasis) d. Side-facing Seats. (1)...


6

Why can't low-cost carriers compromise for the safety of their passengers? Because there are laws and regulations which keep passengers safe, and low-cost carriers are not exempt from those regulations.


6

As mentioned in earlier answers, branding and management (pay, collective bargaining agreements, etc.) are certainly two major factors. And legacy airlines are mindful of the risk to see their profit cannibalised by the new cheap fares so they need to maintain as much segmentation/price discrimination as possible. Interestingly, the two strategies are not ...


6

I've recently experienced the same thing on Schiphol, but to me the things that you mention seem pretty obvious: it's all down to economics. There is only so much parking space around the airport terminals. Aircraft for regional routes are smaller (50-120 passengers), so using a few buses to shuttle the passengers around is only a small undertaking. This ...


5

This article presents the full breakdown of the operating costs of an A320. TL;DR: about 15kUSD/hour, including market-based depreciation. The scenario is based on a private-jet scenario, with much fewer hours per year than your typical EasyJet aircraft, so this number should be considered as the upper limit of the actual operating costs of a low-cost ...


5

I believe the apparent lack of space or the discomfort is a red-herring. That's simply not the case. The passengers don't seem to be tighter packed than in a Ryanair flight actually. And I also don't believe that the sidewards configuration is motivated by this rationale. The aircraft is a Boeing C-17. It does not have a civilian version, so direct ...


4

There are some siuations where it is better to load the luggage individually than in ULDs. The airports served by the flight should have the necessary infrastructure to handle them. As an example, a number of carriers have outsourced their ULD logistics, which are available only in a few (usually long haul) destinations. The ULDs are fast and economical (...


4

A business reason no-one has mentioned yet is the original reason the big names started: Because low cost airlines began flying routes cheaply and created a market If the big names hadn't joined in, all that revenue would have gone to the low cost airlines, who would have grown to the point they could potentially compete in the existing markets, so it was ...


4

Beside all the regulations that require certain maintenance action to be done on aircraft in order for the aircraft to remain air worthy, the simple answer is if LCC compromise safety in order to cut cost no one will want to fly with them and they will lose business.


3

(Source) Direct Operating Costs What percentage of a commercial airline's costs are labor costs? By labor I believe you mean flight- and cabin-crew, the percentage is roughly 12%. Can an airline run a low-cost operation without reducing the wages for crew and pilots, or subjecting them to long shifts? Yes, but they won't make money. What Low Cost ...


3

Yes, airlines may cancel any flight. There is no obligation to execute a specific flight. Their obligations towards the passengers depend on the local legislation. For instance: International Flights: Airlines may cancel international flights, but passengers on flights between countries that honor the Montreal Convention are entitled to damage compensation ...


2

well here are a few reasons off the top of my head. LCC aircraft carry maximum payload so the galleys are not too big. Flying long-haul requires bigger galleys and possibly more toilets. This wastes space which on aircraft configured for short-haul is used to carry pax. In a nutshell a LCC aircraft can carry more pax. The average sector lengths are shorter ...


2

Some are, Norwegian Air runs a flight from Stewart airport in New York to Dublin Ireland and back. One the benefits that LCC's get is from buying only one airframe for their fleet, which can, depending on where they are based limit their range as many fly A320's or 737's. The benefit is not within Europe per say but with short, fast turn around, flights ...


2

Along with being illegal and potentially looking bad, generally, people's lives are in the balance but historically this has not always stopped the more unscrupulous airlines in the past. Arguably Alaska Airlines cut corners that ultimately lead to the fatal crash and deaths of 58 people on flight 261. From the NTSB report: Alaska Airlines' maintenance ...


2

An airline will need to have an 'Air Operator Certificate' (AOC) or something similar issued by the state. In order to have such a certificate it has to show that its operations are in compliance with the national laws of the country. There is also an 'Operations Specification' which details the type of operations the airline can carry out. The respective ...


2

What is the difference between point-to-point and low-cost airlines? Point to point describes an airline that focuses on delivering services without a connecting hub. This cannot be said to imply low cost. A independent airline flying between some islands and not offering connections would fall into this category as much as Ryanair, Easyjet or Spirit ...


2

Outfitting an airline with a single, modern type will yield the lowest operating cost once financing of the acquisition is secured and crew compensation stays low. This, together with the rebates connected to a big order, enables the airline to win any price war with its local competition, because its aircraft will consume less fuel and will be profitable at ...


1

It is hard to say for sure - profits will always be relative and in many cases not clear to anyone without advanced economics/accounting qualifications. However, there are a number of differences in terms of customer experience and service that can make a lot of difference to profit. Examples might be: Crew size - it usually states that the crew on a no ...


1

There are a lot of factors that account for this. This answer covers the bulk purchase aspect of the deal. Basically EasyJet and the like see cost benefits by only flying a singly type of plane and thus only need mechanics and pilots trained on that air-frame and spare parts are interchangeable etc. They also see discounts, as mentioned in the comments by ...


1

Don't compare military troops transports and airliners. Goals are not the same, inducing requirements and means differ. Not to say that soldiers can be packed as cargo, but military transports are supposed to mobilize huge amount of troops with their equipements on the battle field in no time, and soldiers know that and are prepared for critical scenarios. ...


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