38

It is important to remember that it is often difficult to diagnose radio malfunction during flight. Therefore it is hard to know whether you have a malfunctioning transmitter, a malfunctioning receiver, or perhaps both. You also have the point-of-failure that is the headset you are using. For this reason it is quite usual to carry a spare headset and the ...


18

First thing you do when the radio breaks down is to start squawking 7600 (the code for radio malfunction) on your transponder. Then when you approach the airport they will attempt to contact you first through radio (to see if you can still hear them) and you use alternate means of replying (sending IDENT on transponder, rocking your wings,...). If you can'...


15

Ratchet Freak has a good answer. In addition, please pull out your cellphone and try calling the tower. Somewhere in the bottom of my flight bag I have a small book with telephone numbers at towers. If you don't have that, call Lock-Mart Flight Service at 1-800-wx-brief tell him you need the tower number. Also remember that there is no requirement for ...


15

As I pointed out in another answer of mine, it is not legal to use a cell phone in flight, and as another answer to the same question says, it really doesn't work very well anyway.. Now, if the pilot has an emergency, they can exercise the emergency authority of the PIC as allowed in 14 CFR 91.3(b) to go ahead and use the cell phone. If it is just the ...


15

The answers to these questions can be found in the AIM in section 6-4-1. All quotes are from that page. To the first question, you should expect to receive a clearance to 8,000 feet twenty minutes after departure; therefore, don't climb above 4,000 until that time. If you are still in radio contact after 20:55, the "expect" portion of the clearance expires: ...


12

Firstly, it is worth noting that the blocked radio transmission is only one point on a very long list of factors that caused the horrible accident on Tenerife. There is enough redundancy in aviation systems and procedures that a single fault somewhere in the system will [almost] never be enough to cause an accident. Weather, stress, a terrorist attack, ...


10

The FAA says (per 14 CFR 91.185): If the clearance limit is not a fix from which an approach begins, leave the clearance limit at the expect-further-clearance time if one has been received, or if none has been received, upon arrival over the clearance limit, and proceed to a fix from which an approach begins and commence descent or descent and ...


10

should I blindly continue in First, never do anything "blindly". The FAR and the AIM address the Class D question, so this part is the most easily answerable: FAR 91.129 (d) Communications failure. Each person who operates an aircraft in a Class D airspace area must maintain two-way radio communications with the ATC facility having jurisdiction over ...


10

First, squawk 7600 to let ATC know you have lost two way radio communications and to clear traffic out of your way. Then, from the AIM, Section 4. Two-way Radio Communication Failure Section 6-4-1.c. includes: 1. General. Unless otherwise authorized by ATC, each pilot who has two-way radio communications failure when operating under IFR must comply ...


8

AIM 6−4−1. Two-way Radio Communications Failure a. It is virtually impossible to provide regulations and procedures applicable to all possible situations associated with two-way radio communications failure. During two-way radio communications failure, when confronted by a situation not covered in the regulation, pilots are expected to exercise good ...


8

In the US, for VFR, the answer to both of your questions (when and where) is when you are established on downwind. You may not be able to see the light signal if you circle above. I don't think it matters what size the aircraft is. In IFR operations, you may not even be able to see the tower, and as 757toga points out there are different rules. This ...


8

Here are some things you can do, there are probably more. I'm assuming you're mainly interested in checking COM, not NAV. Controlled airport Check if you can hear the ATIS, Ground or Tower; if you can, then at least you know you can receive. But you might as well just call Ground immediately and ask for a radio check. The correct phraseology in the US (see ...


7

Probably not very likely. In 1978 Soviet Union asked US\$100,000 (\$375,200 today) for "caretaking passengers" after their interceptors forced to land KAL 902 on the frozen lake (has never been paid). However firing the two R-60 missiles from interceptors into the airliner was for free.


6

I was a Junior Technician, later Corporal, Air Wireless Fitter in the R.A.F. in 1952-4, servicing Gloster Meteors' radios at a Flying Training School, and the signal then was for the pilot to waggle the aircraft's wings as he approached, or flew by, on his way to land, to show he could not contact the Control Tower. Then we had to fix it. I was made a ...


6

I think you are mis-interpreting the answer, you should remain outside Class-D until the flow of traffic can be acertained. If you lose comms outside of a Class-B or Class-C, you should not enter that airspace, instead divert to a Class-D or E airport if possible. If you are already inside the B/C airspace, continue, but don't enter. Class-A is different, as ...


6

This break down of a B24 Missions seems to outline the usage of flare on a mission well: Assembly After takeoff, a pilot usually kept on a straight course for about two minutes, in part because the B-24 was not very maneuverable until it had gained speed and altitude. The pilot then climbed at a predetermined rate (about 300 feet per minute at ...


5

Your question seems primarily to ask what an air carrier aircraft without radio communication ability (sometimes known as NORDO) should do once it arrives at the airport. First, a bit of background. FAR 91.185 covers how aircraft operating under IFR (IMC and VMC) should respond if they become NORDO. This applies to both General Aviation and Air Carrier ...


5

7600 means a loss of two way communications, it's a way of letting ATC know you have a problem sending or receiving, or both.


5

Yes, this is possible with technology, but there is a big problem too. How do you decide which radio has priority? Right now the system is "whoever has the strongest signal, wins", but both will probably hear a squeal. ATC may hear both, but the strongest one will probably be audible over the noise. This can be advantageous for example if an aircraft in the ...


5

Rule of thumb: Whenever a clearance has an instruction to proceed from point X to point Y, where the path between those points is at the controller's discretion (such as vectors), and you have declared a comm failure by squawking 7600, you are to use your own judgement to proceed between those points by the most logical and reasonable path. So if my ...


4

The rules on this are well-established and clear. They are laid out in FAR §91.185(c)(2). In particular, you should fly at an altitude which is (emphasis mine): At the highest of the following altitudes or flight levels for the route segment being flown: (i) The altitude or flight level assigned in the last ATC clearance received; (ii) The ...


4

This isn't really an answer, but it got to be far too long to put in the comments... Two paragraphs later in the same Wiki: After the KLM plane had started its takeoff roll, the tower instructed the Pan Am crew to "report when runway clear." The Pan Am crew replied: "OK, we'll report when we're clear." On hearing this, the KLM flight engineer expressed ...


3

It's worth noting that any solution to the question you raised would not have prevented this, or similar disasters, from happening. Regardless of any missed or corrupted transmissions with two people speaking at the same time, the crew commenced the take-off without having received, and read-back, a clearance to do so. Short of replacing humans entirely ...


3

Short answer: you're expected to follow the rules you mentioned unless it's an emergency. The regulations are in 91.185 and they say (among other things): Unless otherwise authorized by ATC, each pilot who has two-way radio communications failure when operating under IFR shall comply with the rules of this section. [...] If the failure occurs in ...


3

The reference to “small private jets” and altitude is invalid. Our C550B has a ceiling of FL450, and the B737-800 I used to fly had a ceiling of only FL410. Most “small” jets fly higher than “large” jets. Many times due to limitations, and most of the time due to climb performance and or speed envelopes based on weight. As for making a cell phone call ...


3

Your assumptions are insufficient. If your clearance just states "CLIMB 6000 direct", and there are obstacles along the route, you have been given an incorrect clearance. It should have included the phrase "EXPECT" and an altitude and possibly also a time that would permit you to clear the obstacles. Also, from your Skyvector link, it looks the Direct ...


3

According to this FAA paper, Table 3, ASRS reports were analyzed for 16 months between 1978 and 1979. This included 553 incidents where the recipient was not monitoring, which seems to be the closest category to loss of communications. This equates to a little more than 1 incident a day. Note that this only includes incidents that were reported, and air ...


3

The NORDO procedures are covered extensively in the AIM. That is suggested reading for any pilot. Cellphones are unlikely to work airborne, except close to the ground, and then in remote areas. Most cell systems will ignore a phone which brings up many towers, thereby preventing it from calling. Text might work better. Most pilots don't frequently call ...


3

I think it happens all the time actually. Most of the time its likely not reported. When I did my first solo cross country in a 152, my radio button went out while using VFR flight following. Perhaps they did report it, but they likely just thought it was a new pilot not knowing what he was doing. It was really distracting for myself at the time as a pilot ...


3

The answer depends entirely on the country the aircraft is overflying when an intercept is ordered or requested. I can't imagine payment being demanded by an EU country if the intercept is performed due to a bonafide emergency, or simply out of an excess of caution. However, I know of countries where airport staff will deliberately leave airport runway ...


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