41

Simply, because no airline has determined the route makes economic sense. A poll doesn't necessarily translate into a ready market of passengers. Sure, lots of people might check a box on a survey saying they'd like to see such a thing, but does that really translate to thousands of people actually a significant sum of money for the service? Would enough ...


37

The answer depends a lot on the jurisdiction and airline, but Yes, pilots can change out of uniform during breaks on long flights. A 15 hour flight would have 4 pilots who are all in the flightdeck for takeoff and landing but then divide roughly 14 hours of cruising time into equal rest breaks. Typically 2 pilots will be paired together and take breaks at ...


26

Hawaiian Airlines only recently started acquiring airplanes (A330-200) that are capable of that range. According to Wikipedia, London and Paris routes were discussed. On November 27, 2007, Hawaiian Airlines signed a MOU (Memorandum of Understanding) with Airbus for 24 long-range jets priced at $4.4 billion. The order included six Airbus A330-200s with a ...


21

Looking at FlightAware, we see this takeoff for your flight: Examining some airport charts for KIX, this looks like the standard departure NANKO REVERSAL THREE DEPARTURE from runway 06R. I guess that the loop is to give the aircraft enough time to climb to 8000 before it reaches NANKO. And, I guess the 8000 feet is for either terrain or noise abatement (...


21

There'a a few reasons for this: Safety: During takeoff and landing, everyone should be buckled into a secure seat. They have these seats in the cockpit, and in large aircraft, they're actually very comfortable. Laying down in a crew bed would not be allowed during takeoff or landing (though it happens, off the record). Do note that these beds do indeed have ...


11

Hawaiian Airlines Hawaiian Airlines simply doesn't have any aircraft that can operate the flight. For now, Hawaiian Airlines does not consider its A330-200s to have sufficient range to reach London with the desired payloads and it's not yet sure whether its upcoming A330neos will be able to, either. Flights to London are a goal but may be at the limit of ...


10

NANKO ONE Departure The NANKO ONE Departure, as already written by Robᵩ, is one of the most used departures out of KIX/RJBB. The unusual design with the climbing pattern over the bay is used to minimize interference with the traffic in and out ITM/RJOO Osaka International Airport also known as Itami Airport in the north of the city and to reduce noise ...


8

Yes, short range airliners are designed for up to 90.000 cycles whereas long range airliners can be designed for 40.000 cycles or less. And it is not only the pressurized cabin that needs to be designed for more load cycles, also the landing gear has a lot more work to do. This should become clear when you calculate how many miles/kilometers an airplane will ...


7

I would recommend that you go to https://skyvector.com/ and create a flight plan. It isn't too difficult, just click on "Flight Plan" in the top left corner and you should be able to figure out the rest. You obviously have some familiarity with ICAO airport identifiers, simply look for airports along the way that will keep you under a 886.7 NM leg length,...


7

Crew members each have their own approach to this but in general on the long haul routes, as a pilot you have at least 24h layover, so you can catchup on some sleep, walk outside for a bit (depending on the local time) and then sleep some more so you're fit for the next flight back home. At home you have a couple of days off to recover from the trip. On the ...


5

Yes SELCAL is provided over land in remote areas. I checked the Russian AIP, and shown above is an example. I'm not sure which FIRs the flight from Dublin to Hong Kong will pass through, mainly because the routing near China is not always consistent. Nevertheless, in remote Northern areas as shown SELCAL is provided. According to ICAO Annex 10 it will be ...


5

This is only half related to aviation, but I'll bite. As the Earth is close enough to a sphere (but not exactly..) it is simplest to assume that the longest flight would be from one end of an antipode to the other. According to this site, such a flight would be approximately 20,000 km: There are no non-stop scheduled flights between any two antipodal ...


4

They do this to allow convenient transfer times for passengers at major hubs (in this specific case, Helsinki). In the hours up to the departures of these long range flights, many short- and medium range feeder flights will arrive at Helsinki, with a lot of passengers who are transferring to the long range flights. It basically enables them to operate an ...


4

I do not have inside knowledge of Finnair operations, but I would expect that they have a limited number of staff who speak Japanese, and so logistically running the check in desks for several flights to Japan at the same time allows the airline to schedule checkin staff with appropriate language skills to cover the appropriate flights. There are also ...


4

The reason is to keep you over the water in the climb for noise abatement for the city. Japan is very noise sensitive. You climb to get higher over the water at high power settings before going over land. Hence you are at a higher altitude which equals less noise for the city.


3

Key point -- The sensation only occurred once on the ground and after completion of the XC. until I went to sleep (~11pm) If you have no further symptoms or at least no more severe symptoms, then I see no reason to be too concerned about this, and certainly no reason to bring it up with an AME. (But see added comment below re long-term career ...


3

While it depends on the country, expect to have mandatory immigration checks on first port of entry in most countries. I know this to be true for the US, Canada, Britain, Russia and the EU (Schengen area). Usually only emergency landings are exempt. But they may lead to investigations so not really an alternative to declare one in each and every country. ...


2

Do planes depreciate like cars? Planes do not really depreciate like cars per say but aircraft engines kind of do! Planes are a bit different than cars due to the certification process being far more verbose. Year to year changes tend to be non-existent or come down to trim/paint options. As such a well maintained old aircraft with a fresh/low time engine ...


2

It depends on the laws in the country you are landing in, but for the most part there's no reason you can't refuel without going through customs/passport control, commercial pilots do this all the time. They don't get out of the airplane for the most part but there's no reason they couldn't. Generally there's no reason to go through passport control unless ...


1

It is hard to say for sure - profits will always be relative and in many cases not clear to anyone without advanced economics/accounting qualifications. However, there are a number of differences in terms of customer experience and service that can make a lot of difference to profit. Examples might be: Crew size - it usually states that the crew on a no ...


1

It is just coincidence that they are close together. The dispatchers plan the most efficient routing and it is no surprise that aircraft would follow the same routing.


1

As you say before, #Crew members each have their own approach" about it. I think the key for facing this is try to sleep as much as you can and if is possible, in the local time where you arrive to get avoid quickly the bad consequences of the jetlag. Is very important that you stay hydrate at all times.


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