Hot answers tagged

34

No, you should not*. In my opinion, you should limit your logbook to records of your own flight experience. This would include any time spent training, as PIC, or as required crew. The time you can log as PIC is that which you spend as the sole manipulator of the controls, the sole occupant, or as the pilot in command when the required crew is >1. Here's ...


24

Your friend can't log any time because he isn't licensed and qualified to fly the aircraft and assuming that you aren't a CFI then he isn't receiving training either. He's just a passenger, although if he wants to record the time for his own purposes that's fine, it just doesn't count for anything as far as the FAA's concerned. First, 14 CFR 1.1 says that ...


24

In the US, taxi time can be logged. 14 CFR 61.51 says the pilot must log (emphasis mine): Total flight time or lesson time. And 14 CFR 1.1 says (emphasis mine): Flight time means: (1) Pilot time that commences when an aircraft moves under its own power for the purpose of flight and ends when the aircraft comes to rest after landing; or (...


22

I don't think many airline crew actually bother to log the day/night breakdown. At my airline we have different pay rates for day and night flying, so we do care, but the company "Electronic Logbook" tracks the day/night breakdown for us. The system is not 100% accurate and we sometimes get paid more or less day or night then we actually fly in, but it ...


21

It depends on the final product presented to the airline. If an airline had two candidates, one of whom soloed in 10 hours and did well in a Sim Eval but was self absorbed, didn't like to follow procedures if he/she knew better, and didn't work well with people, and a candidate who took 30 hours to solo but was a team player, can get along with anyone, was ...


20

From a 2008 FAA interpretation sent to E. Thomas Sisk: … cross-country flight time is defined as time acquired during a flight that includes a point of landing that is at least a straight-line distance of more than 50 nm from the original point of departure, not the original point of any flight leg. There is no requirement that any specific leg must be 50 ...


19

The best approach is to start a new logbook with totals that carry over from your latest FAA 8710 - in this case, it sounds like you will roll back to the hours from when you earned your private pilot certificate. There are some other options listed in FAA Order 8900.1, 5-172, but it's unlikely any of them will work for your situation (except, perhaps for "...


19

In order to state the plane is airworthy you must be able to show that all AD's have been complied with and that the aircraft is within annual (or 100 hour) inspection; these proofs are typically found in the logbook so no, without the logbook your aircraft is probably not airworthy. It may be possible to fly the plane legally in the US anyway if you receive ...


19

Flight time is only considered compensation when the pilot is not paying all the costs associated with the flight. If the costs are to be shared the following advice is recommended. A private pilot can be compensated, up to a pro-rata share, of the cost of that specific flight. This would include rental fees, fuel, oil and such. It does not include items ...


18

Yes, it's still done today, at least in military aviation. It's to ensure that the undercarriage does not excede the number of landings it has to endure before being checked/overhauled/replaced. Landing an aircraft can typically be the most stressful regime of flight in terms of loading of certain bits of the aircraft, so it is pertinent to log how many ...


18

The methods that Dan referred to in his answer are valid, and might be used by investigators—the NTSB for example. However, generally speaking the NTSB will not spend a great deal of effort researching pilot time. Instead they will resort to one of two methods of determining pilot experience. Firstly, if a logbook is readily available—either found at the ...


18

The trick my CFI taught me is to use your Course Deviation Indicator or ADF to keep track of landings. After your first landing, bug a course of 010. After your second landing, bug 020. You can reach over and adjust the knob after every landing without having to juggle a pen and a notebook. It's still a manual step, though. You could also use a product like ...


16

Pilots don't generally fly with their logbooks - partially for this exact reason, but also because they don't have to and it's additional clutter. So, in my case (and many Private Pilots), if I'm unlucky enough to fatally bend a plane then the investigators can simply grab my logbook from the flying club lounge. In the case of airlines, I'm positive that ...


16

The honest answer: nobody cares or would even ask you that question during a professional pilot interview. Aside from a military pilot job where they can wash you out during pre-solo training, it doesn’t matter. Primary checkride failures can be dings against you if you have a long string of them without a solid explanation. But everyone fails a primary ...


15

Interesting question, I found myself in exactly that position a couple of months ago (more on that below). First, I found an FAA clarification on this, which is a legal interpretation from 2007 and it partly answers your question. The questioner asked the FAA three questions about logging flight time (in a helicopter in this case); questions 1 and 2 are ...


15

Yes, you should be logging from the start. Now for the first few lessons, it'd be ok to not have your own logbook yet, but you should get one. Hopefully your instructor has kept his up to date, and can build your logbook in terms of flight times since you started.


15

The other answers have provided some easy ways to increment your count without too much distraction, but if you are really "prone to forget [...] when things get busy" as you say, this might not be good enough. I would therefore recommend a solution which does not require any action on your side. Most smartphones today have a pressure sensor. There ...


14

As mah pointed out, if you lose all your logbooks your aircraft/engine/propeller/avionics are no longer airworthy because they lack the documentation of required inspections, AD compliance, etc. Everything is still "airworthy" in the sense that the aircraft doesn't know anything about paperwork and will happily fly, and getting a special flight ("ferry") ...


14

The FAA requirements are for the information to be logged, without specifying the details of how it is logged. It's OK to use electronic log books, and multiple log books. Scanned images are as good as photocopies. Just print them if you ever need them on paper. Some items are required to be signed, so scanned signatures and endorsements may be necessary ...


14

Short answer: an electronic logbook is legal; the FAA will accept almost anything as an endorsement; it's often most practical to collect endorsements on paper but electronic versions are also fine. First, the fundamental point about logbook formats is that the FAA defines what you have to log (14 CFR 61.51), but not how you log it. And clearly electronic ...


13

I'm not sure if this is specifically a military question or a general question. In general aviation (FAA) you are required to do a certain number of landings every 3 months to stay current. So landings are logged for this reason. The specific regulation is 14 CFR 61.57 (a) (1), which says (emphasis added): […] no person may act as a pilot in command of ...


13

Yes, taxi time is considered as pilot hours because even though the airplane is not flying actions by the pilot are required. Basically, the US rule is in FAR 61.51 (e) Logging pilot-in-command flight time. (1) A sport, recreational, private, commercial, or airline transport pilot may log pilot in command flight time for flights- (i) When the ...


12

One way to get a new engine logbook is to send the engine for a factory overhaul. Your engine will be regarded as a usable core, and will come back with all tolerances within "as new" limits and a new logbook.


12

Let me point out that for the purposes of logging flight time, night is defined under 14 CFR 1.1 as follows: Night means the time between the end of evening civil twilight and the beginning of morning civil twilight, as published in the Air Almanac, converted to local time. This means that sunset is not the deciding factor, but rather the published start ...


12

At my outfit, both. Pilots log their own hours in the logbooks and keep a rough mental track of hours flown to ensure compliance with Flight Time Limitation rules. The airline will also log pilot hours to stay in accordance with FTL and compare rosters to actual hours flown. This also serves to create a legal record of who was flying the aircraft should ...


12

Get a Tally Counter, and push the button once per landing. No batteries, nothing to fail, easy to use. Not much more you could ask for. https://tallycounterstore.com/finger-tally-counter-quantity-discounts/ There are even options for mounted ones. https://tallycounterstore.com/mounted-tally-counter/


11

The rules for safety pilots are spelled out in 91.109c but don't specifically state how the safety pilot should log the hours. However, the common consensus I've heard from friends is that you can indeed log safety pilot time as PIC time. The August 2015 Flight Training magazine had an article about this actually. Here is what they said: What is implied ...


11

Yes. You can, as long as you have the appropriate rating and are the sole manipulator of controls. From a FAA response to a similar question: ... a private pilot may log pilot-in-command time, in a complex or high performance airplane, for those portions of the flight when he or she is the sole manipulator of the controls because the aircraft being ...


11

14 CFR 61.51(g) says (my emphasis): (g) Logging instrument time. (1) A person may log instrument time only for that flight time when the person operates the aircraft solely by reference to instruments under actual or simulated instrument flight conditions. (2) An authorized instructor may log instrument time when conducting instrument flight ...


10

I believe the answer, at least in the US is 20 hours of flight time, plus however long a checkride takes. A sport pilot can carry a single passenger and the minimum requirements are outlined in 14 CFR §61.313: If you are applying for a sport pilot certificate with [...] Airplane category and single-engine land or sea class privileges, Then you must log at ...


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