15

Yes, you should be logging from the start. Now for the first few lessons, it'd be ok to not have your own logbook yet, but you should get one. Hopefully your instructor has kept his up to date, and can build your logbook in terms of flight times since you started.


13

Short answer: an electronic logbook is legal; the FAA will accept almost anything as an endorsement; it's often most practical to collect endorsements on paper but electronic versions are also fine. First, the fundamental point about logbook formats is that the FAA defines what you have to log (14 CFR 61.51), but not how you log it. And clearly electronic ...


13

No, you do not need a complex airplane endorsement for this airplane because it doesn't have retractable gear, unless it is a seaplane. All three elements are required for that endorsement to be necessary for landplanes. A jet-engine is not a controllable-pitch propeller, therefore it would not require a complex endorsement even if it has retractable gear ...


11

There are two aspects here, one what is required legally and then what may be required locally. From a legal standpoint (in your case) the basic PPL will allow you to fly single engine, fixed pitch prop, under 200HP, fixed gear aircraft. If you want to go over 200 HP you will need a High Performance check out and log book endorsement. For a constant speed ...


7

No training needed. If you are typed in the aircraft, none of the SIC type stuff applies (that is just an ICAO formality and is superseded by having a normal type rating). As long as you meet the requirements to act as SIC (landing currency, company training currency, etc) you are good to transition to the right seat with no additional training.


6

Here is verbiage from the FAA's AC 61-65G, appendix A, regarding endorsements. Also, in my view as long as the instructor's endorsement verbiage covers the essential elements in the regulation underlying the actual rquirement(s) that must be met, there are no mandatory words that must be used. However, should a question arise regarding the action, level ...


6

I've been using myflightbook.com for a couple of years now. It is free, easy to use, and very comprehensive. I've flown over 100 different aircraft types and am rated in several different categories so it's important to me that the elogbook that I use is capable of handling all of the oddball piloting stuff that I do and myflightbook does it all. As to ...


5

I obtained 100% on my Private Pilot Airplane Single Engine Land (ASEL) test in the US. My instructor didn't need to provide an additional endorsement. However, upon seeing my score, the Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE) was especially tough. After a hard grilling, she admitted to me: "I wanted to go hard on you because 100% on your FAA test doesn't mean you ...


5

If we're talking about FAA regs I'm not aware of any endorsement required if your student passes the test with a perfect score (they need an endorsement to take the test - I have given the instruction required by..., and they need an endorsement like the one in your question if they fail or don't manage a perfect score). The endorsement above is intended ...


5

The last that I looked into it, there were no expiration dates on written test endorsements by CFI and GI. However, the FAA has made it clear many times that instructors are free to add conditions to endorsements. For example, when I endorse a student for solo, I will put limitations like: 1.Prior phone call to instructor, 2. surface winds less than 14K, ...


4

You only need one complex endorsement under FAA regulations, §61.31 Type rating requirements, additional training, and authorization requirements. (c) Aircraft category, class, and type ratings: Limitations on the carriage of persons, or operating for compensation or hire. Unless a person holds a category, class, and type rating (if a class ...


4

To answer question #1: A complex endorsement is just that. It’s an endorsement. There are not any prescribed maneuvers to receive the endorsement. But, the instructor is holding himself liable for your performance after receiving the endorsement. Primarily, the areas where that liability may prove hazardous to the instructor, their certificate and career is ...


4

It seems to me that your question is simply "can an instructor provide flight training from the ground?", whether it's for a flight review or something else. As far as I can tell, the instructor must be in the aircraft. All emphasis below is mine. 61.1: Flight training means that training, other than ground training, received from an authorized ...


4

The FAR's don't talk about whether or not a CFI can accept another instructor's solo endorsement. If the student has the endorsement, the 90 day period has not expired, and the make and model of the aircraft in the endorsement matches, then the student is technically good to go. That said, a good CFI would carefully review the student's log book and, if ...


3

In my opinion, I think the wording of 61.93(a)(i) is pretty clear. Anytime a student pilot flies more than 25 NM from their home airfield they will need an endorsement. I don't know where you are based at. At my home airfield, all the practice areas are within the 25 NM radius of the airfield. If a student pilot gets a little outside of the 25NM radius ...


3

You are required to verify the identity of people undergoing initial Sport Pilot, Recreational Pilot, Private Pilot, Instrument, and Multi Engine training. Any other kind of dual instruction does not require verification of US citizenship or TSA approval of resident aliens. See 49 CFR 1552.3(h). The CFI must inspect the original documents and verify they ...


3

The intent of the regulation lies at the beginning, in 61,93(a): §61.93 Solo cross-country flight requirements. (a) General. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a student pilot must meet the requirements of this section before— (i) Conducting a solo cross-country flight, or any flight greater than 25 nautical miles ...


3

Advisory Circulars by definition, are advisory and not regulatory in nature (Chapter 1, paragraph 3 of FAA Order 1320.46C). Therefore, AC 61-65 provides suggested language that will ensure compliance with the FARs. You are free to word the endorsements differently, but if the examiner takes issue with your endorsement, the student may not have any recourse ...


3

As has been mentioned you should log hours as soon as you start flying. All training hours with a CFI count towards your license, if you are paying for those lessons, you should log them. As for books, also as mentioned there are a few kinds out there but if you are starting with your PPL a basic log book will suffice. There are also many paid, online ...


2

Yes you should whether you are PIC or not, solo or dual.


2

There's no formal definition or regulation that I could find; introductory flights aren't defined in 14 CFR 1.1, for example. I'm not sure why the FAA would care how often you fly with someone, or what the difference is between an introductory flight and any other flight with a non-paying, 'non-logging' passenger. The only other people who might care about ...


2

I can not find any guidance other than what you have already noted for Class B airspace endorsements. The ground and flight training requirements seems to be left up to the discretion of the CFI. Though, it seems to be very similar to a solo endorsement as having criteria that is subjective to student and instructor. Similar to a solo endorsement, a ...


2

Easy, peasy. Fill out a label/sticker with the endorsement printed on it. Then, all you have to do is sign it and place your CFI number on it. You can then either scan it or take a photo of it. Your student can upload the scanned document or photo into an electronic logbook. If they do not have an electronic logbook, they can print out the endorsement at the ...


2

The test was discontinued. No reason the DPE would be looking in her logbook as a discontinuance is simply a pause in the testing process. She was eligible to test, she remains eligible to test. If she already told the DPE about this the smart DPE would make a note in her test records explaining what occurred. Once endorsed the applicant is endorsed. If the ...


2

The regulation means you need to land at three separate airports. This should include landing at your original departure airport at the end of the flight. §61.109(a)(5)(ii) One solo cross country flight of 150 nautical miles total distance, with full-stop landings at three points, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of more ...


1

There is no requirement for multiple endorsements. Title 14 CFR 61.87 spells out the requirements for student solo flight. There are many requirements, but the question was about endorsements. 61.87(p)(4) is the only part of this section that specifically addresses endorsements, and it says: (p) Limitations on flight instructors authorizing solo ...


1

I would think the newly minted CFI should use the same words the FAA uses: "Pending". Can't go wrong with that.


1

This Advisory Circular describes what should be examined when transitioning (and ultimately endorsing) a pilot for complex operations. This publication is offered as a guide to the procedures and standards to be followed for a thorough and comprehensive checkout in these airplanes. The conscientious application and adherence to the scope of ...


1

There is no FAR regarding intro flights for prospective student pilots. Different instructors handle things differently. I use a log sheet which was created with a spreadsheet program, which I use for student flights. It has critique blocks for different parts of the lesson, which includes preflight, engine start, take-off, medium bank turns, etc. You ...


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