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It comes down to a matter of philosophy. Or, if you are less generous, it’s a matter of fashion. Note that the Russian equivalent to the C-141, the Il-76, uses a T-tail, too, while the An-124 uses a conventional tail. T-tails were in fashion in the early jet age. They were widespread, first in fighters and later in transport aircraft, too, because they: ...


10

High wing military aircraft (c141 and c5 both are) use T tails for multiple reasons. to prevent rocks and debris from damaging the tail when landing off airport to keep tails out of the engine thrust line (which are higher than on a low wing aircraft) during cruise where vibration may cause fatigue a T tail can be smaller (lighter with less drag) as the ...


4

A primary reason is that it facilitates a large cargo hatch and ramp to be built into the rear of the plane, for loading and unloading. No elevator spar running through the middle of the rear of the aircraft to get in the way. Note that both the current C17 and A400m transports, very recent designs, also use a T tail. Both have large cargo hatches in the ...


1

I worked on both aircraft for Lockheed (1967-1983). The reason for the T tails is a government requirement that the aircraft must be able to land in a depression or say wide ditch. The stabilizer must clear the required depression height. True I am 80 years old but my mind is clear enough to remember this. We did a tremendous amount of time in flight test ...


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