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Yes, it is possible and variable-incidence wings have been used. The only production example was the Vought F-8 Crusader, used primarily by the US Navy. It had a variable-incidence wing, which tilted nose-up by about 7 degrees to give increased lift for takeoff. The conventional solution of a lengthened nose undercarriage was deemed impractical for the ...


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All it means is the deck angle of the fuselage will be lower for a given speed. Weight being the same, the wing will fly at the AOA it needs to fly at to support the weight. By increasing the incidence, the fuse will just be pointing down more because AOA will be the same for a given flight condition. You have a downstream problem as well because the ...


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In short, no. But it depends... Angle of incidence does not increase or decrease lift, only angle of attack and airspeed affect lift. Let me explain - If you had an aircraft with a variable angle of incidence you could fly at a constant angle of attack while varying the incidence and have no effect on lift. Picture the wing steady with respect to the ...


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If I am thinking about this correctly, increasing angle of incidence would increase lift because you would also be increasing angle of attack. Increasing the angle of attack would increase lift until you reach the critical angle where you have airflow separation and aerodynamically stall the wing. It’s the angle of attack that’s important. A better ...


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Yes. Angle of Attack is included in the Lift formula. Lift generally increases with angle of attack in a linear fashion until AOA reaches stall. This is why it is not a good idea to fly at too high an AOA. Better to increase Velocity. Lift increases with Velocity squared. The Navy Vought F-8 Crusader had a "variable incidence wing" that was raised to a ...


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What is the important parameter in foils that will make it start spinning The aerofoil needs to create lift in a direction that causes rotation. Typically aerofoils stall at around 15 degrees angle of attack, so you would need to rotate your blades to around -75 degrees to get them started, and gradually reduce this as they speed up. and descent with ...


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There's some info on autorotation, including some references, in this answer. And also a pertinent question on Physics SE. Free body diagrams included. In short: Autorotation only works in a satisfactory way if the vehicle has forward velocity: in a vertical descent, in optimal circumstances, autorotation works as well as a leaky parachute does. Getting ...


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