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1

It's important to distinguish between longitudinal stability forces and trim forces, and I find that the literature in general does a very poor job of explaining it for the quasi-layperson. I use this concept to make it easier to picture what is going on in your mind. Longitudinal stability is simply the airplane weathervaning about the C of G into the ...


2

TL;DR: Inviscid flow is not physical, however theoretical inviscid flow can still flow around a streamlined body (such as a wing) and it will produce lift. There is no such thing as zero viscosity, so all we can use to answer your question is theory. In the theory, there is "inviscid flow", and it's an extremely useful tool we very commonly use to ...


4

TLDR: No viscosity -> no friction, no friction -> no boundary layer, and no boundary layer -> no pressure difference, no pressure difference -> no lift. Difficult question to answer, took a lot of reading up Let's start here though, an excerpt from some NASA educational material. Aerodynamic forces depend in a complex way on the viscosity of the ...


0

Lift is mainly a result of AoA and camber. Thickness has a very small effect, so much so that some aerodynamic theories disregard it entirely. It mostly has an effect on drag and it should be relatively high for subsonic aircraft so that the airfoil can operate at a wide range of AoAs without stalling. It should also be high so that the moment of inertia of ...


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