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In level flight the lift must equal the weight of the aircraft (which will typically reduce as it burns fuel). If lift exceeds weight then the aircraft will accelerate upwards; thus is something that we typically see at takeoff, and hopefully just before landing when the aircraft‘s rate of descent drops to almost zero. The maximum lift would be generated ...


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In a steep turn, at high speed. In addition to the lift needed to compensate weight, a turn requires the wing to produce additional lift to accelerate the aircraft sideways. Speed is required so enough dynamic pressure is available to produce all that lift. The same happens at the bottom of a tight loop when weight and the lift needed to compensate ...


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On the first picture, it shows that the minimum drag point is exactly the same as the maximum L/D ratio This makes sense, at least in the context of linear constant-altitude flight, because Lift must equal Weight and therefore is constant, so if we maximize L/D, we also must minimize Drag. (Also, if we're maximizing L/D, we're simultaneously maximizing Cl/...


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Your lift will be prescribed and cannot be freely chosen. So what you need to do is to minimize the drag that goes with this given lift. In straight flight lift needs to equal weight. In turns, the centripetal force is added to this. At high speed a small angle of attack will produce that lift while at low speed the angle of attack needs to be high. In most ...


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As we have learned here at Avation Stack Exchange through many writings: thrust or power variation is critical in take off, climb, and cruise flight. In straight line steady state flight (at the same speed) lift only equals weight in level flight, in climb or descent it is equal to the cosine climb or descent angle x weight. In a climb the engine must ...


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