Hot answers tagged

11

Yes. But you will still need instrument rating and ATPL theory as this is multi crew aircraft. The amount of learning will be the same as to get CPL. Maybe fees for the license will be lower but who cares if you buy an A380?


10

Just as people can go for quite a while driving without a license before they get caught, there is no certain way to catch somebody who goes flying without a license. There are various ways that it can happen, but none of them are certain. There was a quip quoted elsewhere referring to the high proportion of unlicensed pilots in Alaska, that supposedly the ...


10

According to this CNN article the FAA revoked their licences with a letter containing the following reasons (emphasis mine): The letter said the pilots were "extremely reckless." "Not only did you not comply with ... [air traffic controller] instructions, you did not even monitor the aircraft's air-ground radios," the letter said. "You were ...


7

Given the hours required for the ATP, the chance of doing that rating alone in under a year seems pretty remote. Getting the private and commercial certificates done inside of a year is entirely possible, although not cheap. The writtens for the ATP are no big deal, but the hours simply will take a lot of time, as well as the right employment opportunity, ...


5

A typical ultralight looks like this, although there are plenty of different designs: Source: wikimedia.org Ultralights in the US are defined and regulated by 14 CFR 103. The definition in 103.1 is: For the purposes of this part, an ultralight vehicle is a vehicle that: (a) Is used or intended to be used for manned operation in the air by a ...


5

I assume that your FAA private license was issued under 14 CFR 61.75, and that section also includes the requirements for adding instrument privileges: (d) Instrument ratings issued. A person who holds an instrument rating on the foreign pilot license issued by a contracting State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation may be issued an ...


5

The easiest option is to find a US CFI/AI holder in the country you are in, to sign off on your approaches. It might be allot easier if s/he is also a Spanish CFI particularly if you are flying in a Spanish registered aircraft. You do not indicate if you hold a certificate from Spain. It is not uncommon to find instructors with US FAA CFI ratings in other ...


4

The only situation in which a US-licensed pilot is subject to an age limit is part 121 scheduled airline service. Other than that there are no age limits, you just have to be able to pass your medical exam. However, you state that in your scenario the pilot will have to be able to fly cargo in and out of the US. That implies the pilot may have a foreign ...


4

Generally you have 7 years for your ATPL theoretical knowledge, but actually it depends whether you already have Instrument Rating and Commercial Pilot License. If you do not have CPL and/or IR, you have only 36 months. If you have IR, you have 7 years. Moreover, according to FCL.025(c), you have to pass your IR in 36 months after the theoretical exam (...


4

The FAA has, at least in the recent past, been backlogged with some forms and certificate issuance has been one of those items. My private pilot certificate took nearly 3 months to arrive (hence, my temporary certificate almost expired). I had to make several calls to my DPE (Designated Pilot Examiner), who then reached out to the FAA in Oklahoma City to see ...


4

Really this is a moot point... 14 CFR 91.319 (a) states: (a) No person may operate an aircraft that has an experimental certificate—    (1) For other than the purpose for which the certificate was issued; or    (2) Carrying persons or property for compensation or hire. And again (e) states: (e) No person may operate ...


4

I just contacted FSDO about adding the IFR rating to my FAA PPL land, multiengine,based on my foreign license, and the answer was I need to go through the verification process again, then take the test and then create an application with IACRA, after that call the fsdo to get an appointment.


4

Lets break this down as best we can. For starters you've made an error in your assertion. The pilot hasn't had their license revoked, just simply their SEP rating. There's a difference. The person in question can still do their day job as a pilot, on a type-rated aircraft. They have accepted a suspension of their Single Engine rating. On some finer points ...


3

If you were willing to travel to the US (which is not all that uncommon to get a pilots license) and get your license under the FAA regulations you could do it as per the regulations, §67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a) The person shall ...


3

Generally speaking, you need to hold a licence issued by the same country that the aircraft is registered in. There may be exceptions but you cannot fly an Australian aircraft on your EASA licence. Luckily, converting a PPL between countries is generally straightforward when it has been issued by an ICAO-contracted state (which is most advanced countries ...


2

Do you mean frozen ATPL? This can be easily done in 3 months if you have unlimited money and normal intellectual qualities.


2

In Australia you can get a class 1 medical whilst being colour-blind, limited to day VFR. Night flying over here is a separate rating and not incorporated into the PPL/CPL so it is optional - it might limit your job prospects but you can absolutely fly on a CPL here in daytime only.


2

In the US, driving while under the effects of alcohol and drugs may have a adverse effect on your medical certificate. Additionally, I have heard (from an FAA inspector) second hand that in one instance, someone who had a driver's license revoked for a large number of speeding and reckless driving circumstances, eventually had a medical certificate revoked. ...


2

Yes I believe so. While the Sport Pilot License only requires that you are medically qualified to get a driver's license there is a stipulation that if you had been denied an FAA medical previously then you cannot just use your driver's license as your medical. If you don't respond to their questions then you will most certainly be denied the medical. ...


2

An RPL requires less training (i.e. money) but is more restricted in how far you can fly, how many passengers you can carry and how heavy the aircraft can be. You can get an endorsement to fly anywhere domestically; there is no endorsement available to fly internationally or for the other two restrictions, nor is an instrument rating available. A PPL allows ...


1

In the US, the FAA's requirements for obtaining authorization to fly former ,military aircraft is included in 8900.1 Volume 5, Chapter 9, Section 2. It is quite lengthy and covers more than just former military aircraft. As others have pointed out, most of these aircraft do not have a Type Certificate. They normally have a Special Airworthiness ...


1

This information doesn't easily exist, I'm sure insurance companies have some figures but they don't seem to be public. I'm just going to expand on Pondlife's answer with more data. In Australia the regulator CASA publishes all sorts of statistics, including the number of medical certificates issued and refused (page 164). Australian professional pilots ...


1

(US-based answer) The problem with answering your question is that it isn't all clear what "losing a medical" actually means. If a pilot is denied a medical, the FAA will obviously know and you could probably get that data from them somehow, even if it takes an FOIA request. But what if you just decide not to renew because you know you'd fail? For all the ...


1

I'm an Australian PPL pilot but know some people who have gone through the UK system. Terminology differences aside, the training pathways are pretty comparable. If you choose to train in Australia you can convert your licence to the UK fairly easily by passing a flight test. The main differences are: In Australia you need to do 7 CPL exams and then 7 ...


1

For a Private Pilot, the licenses are completely separate and have absolutely no relation to each other. In addition, there are no criminal record checks for a Private Pilot in the UK. Things get very different when moving to commercial licenses and looking for careers. I'm trying to find some further legislation with you - I would expect the CAA have a ...


1

Without your Class 1 you will not be able to get your CPL. You could however finish CPL theory and get an Instructor Rating with your PPL and Class 2 Medical (plus the required 150 hours PIC and 200 hours total). IR can be done with Class 2 Medical and an Class 1 Audiogram (hearing) test.


1

it depends on whether or not your plane carries hull insurance. No insurance underwriter is going to knowingly insure an aircraft given that its owner is unlicensed and pilots the craft. This means that the FAA might not care whether or not you have a license, but your insurance agent almost certainly will.


1

I've heard of the FAA conducting ramp checks but never experienced it myself. I've only experienced being checked when there was an accident, and FAA was investigating I've asked this same question of pilots in the past and gotten rather comical responses, like "as long as you don't crash the faa doesn't care" and things of that sort. Licensing is for ...


1

You would need an M-1 (for training at a flight school) or F-1 (for training at a college & some flight training academies) Visa to receive flight training. More information here.


1

As a caveat here, I know nothing about gyroplanes. But based on the US regulations it looks like there are a few different possibilities. If your ULM license is equivalent to an ICAO private license then you could get an FAA foreign-based private license as described in this question. I believe you would get category rotorcraft and class gyroplane (see 14 ...


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