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7

An LAPL allows you to act as PiC, carrying passengers, but only in the type and variant you pass your test on. A LAPL for aeroplanes will allow you to act as pilot in command (PIC) on two classes of aircraft: either a single-engine piston aeroplane (land) or touring motor glider (TMG) with a maximum take-off mass of 2000 kg or less, carrying a maximum of ...


6

Unfortunately, an LAPL license isn't ICAO compliant. This is from the UK CAA: Licences which do comply are known as ICAO licences and those which do not are known as non-ICAO licences. Non-ICAO licences are not fully recognised internationally, and therefore are only valid for use within certain states or Europe; for example, the LAPL is only valid ...


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I have a partial answer after more research and some help on pprune. A Bronze + XC can be used to get a gliding licence, which under the transitional arrangements can be used to obtain a LAPL(S). In theory the route from there to a LAPL(S)+TMG and on to a LAPL(A) TMG is feasible, however the BGA is not an ATO yet and there are very few instructors or ...


3

The LAPL does allow you to fly a Cessna 172 as it's maximum take-off weight is less than 2000kg, during the day, in visual meteorological conditions. It does not allow you to add any extras on, you cannot possibly fly at night or in instrument conditions, ever. With the PPL you can get a night rating or get an instrument rating for flight in cloud. Not that ...


3

The EASA issued LAPL(A) is limited to 2to MTOM, 3 passengers max and only valid in European countries. A PPL(A) issued by an EASA country does not have these restrictions, but can be subject to local restrictions in the non-European country you want to flyin, e.g. you cannot use the EASA PPL(A) to fly in the US without further paperwork. For more ...


2

I'm not sure about their equivalence (meaning one cannot fly in US with a LAPL right way), but the closest that comes is the Recreational Pilot license. The requirements are roughly similar: 30 hours flying experience; however, the FAA requires 3 hours of solo flying and cross country requirements are slightly different. The limitations are also roughly ...


1

Available Ratings: You can add class ratings to the NPPL to allow you to fly microlights, self-launching motorgliders (SLMGs) and simple single-engine aeroplanes (SSEAs). The above are the only available ratings for an an NPPL. An NPPL (and LAPL) is strictly a VFR license, therefore you could not get rated for IMC. However, you can continue your training ...


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The new EASA LAPL licenses (A, S, etc.) are sub-ICAO level licenses, meaning that they do not conform to ICAO standards (required minimum training hours, for one). Since ICAO is normally the framework under which various countries accept each others' licenses, there is currently no recognition of LAPL outside of EASA member states.


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