14

You may find this manual of interest from the FAA. The short answer is that they don't have brakes like wheeled aircraft do. With sufficient runway you don't need brakes to stop a wheeled aircraft either. The airframe often provides enough drag to stop the airplane. You are generally correct that aerodynamics are not the primary method of braking, however ...


9

The takeoff and landing performance on different surfaces varies with condition - for example, a wet or snowy paved runway will have different braking and rolling acceleration performance than a dry paved runway. We can make some general/broad statements, but it's important to note that the specific conditions on any given day will play a large part in ...


6

It really depends on how you intend on landing the vehicle, how you intend on using the vehicle, and generally any design limitations that may come into play. For fixed wing aircraft that need to land with a forward velocity you can chose either skids, wheels or a combination of both. Skids are beneficial as they are, simple, light and take up less space ...


5

Full up elevator and retraction of the flaps increases aerodynamic drag and downforce in the skis, reducing the time and distance required to stop. Seaplanes have the same issue.


1

The obvious one: when you land an airplane on skids, the skids abrade. This makes skids suitable only for aircraft which fly only occasionally (like the Dream Chaser): if you have 6 flights in a year, the maintenance on the skids is acceptable. For daily flights, not so much.


1

Helicopter specific answer As a vary general rule, any smaller [less than 10 passenger] helicopter designed for general utility etc. work will often have skids, conversely large helicopters, military, VIP and Naval helicopters tend to have wheels. Skid Gear is great for landing in softer terrain, it gives you a platform for people working from the side of ...


1

It turns out a skid is the safest option. There are potential issues with tires in the space environment and this eliminates one of the tires. there will be one major difference when the nose is pitched forward, given the Dream Chaser will not be using a traditional Nose Landing Gear (NLG) wheel for its rollout. Instead, and inbuilt skid strip will touch ...


1

The data you are looking for depends heavily on the conditions at any given time (mainly wind and temperature). You can find the data for a given airframe in its accompanying POH. For example you can find the POH for the Cessna 172 Here. The POH lists the landing distance (over a 50ft obstacle on a runway) as 1250Ft. however that can vary based on conditions....


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