31 votes

Why aren't all fighter jets' engine intakes on top instead of forward?

When the inlets are on top, the air entering the engine must make a 90 degree turn to get into the engine. This will cause inefficiencies and might cause massive separation -- which would be very bad....
Rob McDonald's user avatar
  • 9,286
27 votes
Accepted

How does the Yak-130 fly with blocked engine inlets?

The inlets are closed in order to avoid FOD (foreign object damage) when taking off from unprepared fields. Anyway when the main inlets close, above the fuselage two other inlets open, as visible for ...
sophit's user avatar
  • 10.9k
21 votes

Why aren't all fighter jets' engine intakes on top instead of forward?

Forward-facing intakes provide ram air compression, which convert airspeed into additional pressure. This significantly improves engine performance if there's any significant airspeed. It's true that ...
Therac's user avatar
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18 votes
Accepted

Is the clamshell on the AN-72 what causes the Coanda effect?

Those clam-shell doors are the engine thrust reversers. You can see them deploy together with the spoilers after landing in this video: In fact, you can also see deployed spoilers in your picture, ...
Bianfable's user avatar
  • 55.5k
11 votes

Why aren't all fighter jets' engine intakes on top instead of forward?

Takeoff is only a small part of the flight regime. And not necessarily the most demanding. A high G turn , where the inlet on the top of the wingroot is in the shadow of the airflow...air intake is ...
WPNSGuy's user avatar
  • 8,366
3 votes

How would you know the difference between a compressor stall and a surge based on indications in the cockpit?

Stall and surge are two different, although related, physical phenomena. Stall: One or more blade stages exceed the critical AoA, the airflow is turbulent, and the smooth airflow through the ...
El_Muntagnin's user avatar

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