39

No, you would need to arrange for customs as you are crossing an international border.


38

Details of the No FIR area The area extends on 175,000 square kilometers: From ≈70°N (Bodø FIR) to the North Pole. From 30°E to ≈32°05'E, and to 35°E for a portion east of Svalbard archipelago. VATSIM Murmansk sectors (ATC simulation). Source Border dispute This Barents Sea strip is of major importance, and has been subject to a dispute between ...


38

Yes, it is possible to land an airplane in the US at a private airport when you have taken off from a foreign airport. No, you may not do it legally. Doing this is a federal crime. Since you are smuggling something, you may not care about the legality. When you are eventually caught, you will go to prison. Your assets will be confiscated by and forfeited ...


28

You can find a full list of airports on the continent here, the majority are ice/snow runways with two gravel runways at Rothera Air Facility and TNM. Supported is a loose term down there, however Williams Field which services McMurdo Station is groomed and has fuel available. Phoenix Airfield which also serves McMurdo can accept wheeled landings and seems ...


25

I can see at least three questions here and only one of them is fully aviation-related. First, can an airliner legally divert to Pyongyang in an emergency, under the laws of its own country? For US airlines, the answer is yes. 14 CFR 91 SFAR 79 bans flights over North Korea, but does allow an exception in an emergency: 2. Flight Prohibition. Except as ...


19

It is usually required to file a flight plan for international flights (with very few exceptions), and I'll assume this is the case for Canada/US as well, but I'm not 100% sure of this. In this case you have two options You close your flight plan and let ATC or FSS know where you are, they'll note it's an international flight that landed somewhere without ...


19

The US does have specific regulations that require the pilot to ensure that passengers are briefed on certain safety issues, although there's no requirement that the pilot must do it personally. Here are two regulations from the part 91 (all flights) and part 121 (scheduled airline flights) regulations. There may be others. 14 CFR 91.107(a)(2): No pilot ...


17

In general*, any time people or cargo enter another country, they must do so at a designated Port of Entry, i.e. where customs and immigration officers are stationed. This is true regardless of whether traveling by land, sea or air. Trying to enter other than at a PoE is usually a serious crime, and in the case of flying without a proper flight plan, may ...


16

In an emergency that requires landing as soon as possible an aircraft can (and should) land at the nearest suitable airport, laws and international incidents be damned. If your 747 is on fire then being on the ground at an airport in North Korea is preferable to exploding in the air or winding up in the ocean or on the ground somewhere that's not an airport. ...


15

Lots of reasons are possible, ranging from winds to other issues. In this case I'm willing to bet that the first flight was based on the most efficient routing to take advantage of tailwinds en route and that the second was avoiding Syrian and Turkish air space because of the political issues there earlier this year. See also: Flight Delays Incurred ...


14

Nothing would stop them from doing this unless someone dropped a dime on this flight with credible evidence that this would happen. Yes police or the DEA would be notified. This is the profile of a drug smuggler. If you act like a drug smuggler, expect to be treated like a drug smuggler. Is all traffic scrutinized? I cannot confirm that all traffic is ...


14

Broadly the legal constructs that apply here are essentially the same as for sailing vessels - in other words when you're outside the jurisdiction of any given nation the laws of the country the vessel is registered in apply, and the captain is the one who makes the decisions. More specifically once you enter the airspace of a nation that nations laws ...


14

Pre-announced missile launches will often be published by responsible countries in NOTAMs (Notices to Airmen), which are notices of potential hazards to aircraft in flight or on the ground. These are generally things like closed runways, inoperative radio navigation aids, cranes on approach or departure paths and the like. They can also warn pilots about ...


11

When considering flying an aircraft across the U.S. border, you also have to consider that there is extensive radar coverage of all airspace within the U.S., with varying flight ceilings for different classes of aircraft. Monitored not just by the FAA, but also the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Defense. This isn't just a safety issue ...


11

Yes they can. There was an attempt to allow one to pass over a country freely with the Freedoms of the Air however this is not a blanket thing and not everyone partakes. ....As of the summer of 2007, 129 countries were parties to this treaty, including such large ones as the United States of America, India, and Australia. However, Brazil, Russia, ...


11

Think about how your question is fundamentally different from this one: If you have friend in the USA that owns a lot of land that is suitable for landing a plane, and you own a private jet with 2 pilots in Colombia, can you takeoff in private property without notifying anybody on what you have on the plane and where you are going or anything like that ...


10

A flight plan is just that, a plan. A flight can deviate from its cleared route for many reasons, the most common of which are: Weather Traffic Shortcuts Weather reroutes are often initiated by the crew. Center, N12345 request 15 right for weather N12345 15 right approved for 100 nm, report direct XYZ. Or they can be initiated by ATC N12345, ...


10

In areas where the ATC provides the altitude in meter (China (PRC), North Korea, and Russia), depending on the equipment (altimeter), the pilot can determine what to do: In case of older aircraft, where the altimeter is calibrated in feet, the pilots use a conversion card for determining the altitude in feet, before dialing in the altitude to the autopilot. ...


10

Because the United Arab Emirates is, as the name suggests, a federation of seven loosely-affiliated emirates (the largest and most populous of which are Abu Dhabi and Dubai, in that order), each with its own royal family. Emirates is based in Dubai; the Emir of Abu Dhabi, Sheikh Khalifa (who also happens, by longstanding convention, to be the president of ...


9

ATC and pilots must be able to communicate in English on international flights involving ICAO member states. There are 191 countries that are members of the ICAO, covering almost all of the world. While communications may be performed in the local language, English must be used upon request on international flights. Controllers and flight crew engaged in ...


9

It all depends on the laws of the country that the crew is visiting. Some do and some don't. Many do unless they have a reciprocal agreement with the pilot's country, in which case they don't. This would be a great question for a specific country pair, or even if you want to know the laws about a specific country (in which case we could give the actual ...


9

At the most basic level, the DHS/Dept.Of State regulations regarding work authorization have to be followed. There are essentially three categories you can be in, as far as employment is concerned: A naturalized or natural-born U.S. Citizen. You're allowed to work for any U.S. employer. An (in-status) permanent resident (green card holder). You're allowed ...


8

Long story short, yes. First, can non-US citizens get an FAA ATPL? Plenty of non-US citizens - myself included - hold FAA pilot's licenses (although I'm not an ATP). This question has more details, but as long as you're legally in the US with an appropriate visa, and you have TSA approval for training, then you can get any FAA license you want (or can ...


8

Handlers are private companies who provide services (for a fee) to pilots and passengers when they fly in and out of an airport. Depending on the airport, sometimes handlers are required by the local authorities to be used, and other times there are not even any handlers available (a lot of US airports do not have them, for instance). Often though, they ...


7

Addressing the "If the crew never leave the plane, have they really entered the foreign country?" question only -- yes. I've done numerous turns to Canada, Mexico and the Bahamas where we just drop off passengers, pick up the next load and fly back to the US (specifically IAH or EWR in my case). When you get back to the US, you will go through customs ...


7

ICAO has standardized on English (PDF), which "urges" (apparently it does not require?) contracting states (participating members) to use English for all communication. I believe proficiency standards implementation was originally set for 2008, but was pushed back to 2011. The exceptions to this standard would be, most likely, any country which is not an ...


7

Insofar as it relates to MH370 the treaty sections Pondlife quoted would probably work quite smoothly if it were found by a government or someone working on behalf of the govt. The question arises as to what happens when James Cameron goes and finds it. (Inevitable, am I right?) If it is located by a private party then the law would not be quite so clear. ...


7

(Guessing the) Runway Selection For spotting airplanes, you want to know which are the current active runways. The runway history of planes or flights shouldn't matter much, unless your plane of interest is limited in what runways it can use. Large airports have many parallel runways. In general, outsiders will not have enough information at hand to ...


6

In the specific case of Canada, AOPA and COPA have a lot of information aimed at US pilots. AOPA has a complete guide on documents, customs etc. and COPA has a page with more information, which includes this remark: The flying rules are almost indistinguishable - reading the COPA guide should keep you legal and out of trouble. Make sure you get a Canada ...


6

I can only speak for Europe and the U.S. but be prepared to encounter controllers who only speak French when flying in France. As far as I know, France is the only country in Europe where English is not required for ATC. The same may be true for (former) French colonies but I don't know for sure.


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