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25

It helps to know the objective of both ICAO and IATA to understand when which code is used. ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) is a UN-body which focusses on international harmonization of civil aviation regulations. ICAO codes are used for "official" purposes such as Air Traffic Control; E.g. flight plans use ICAO codes for airports and ...


22

It looks to me like the source site you quoted is unreliable or at least not current, e.g. it gives results for codes QQQ and ZZZ too, but they haven't been assigned by IATA. The actual IATA code for Mena (ICAO: KMEZ) seems to be MZX. Anyway, there's no particular reason why XXX, ZZZ or any other specific combination should be assigned; they just haven't ...


21

Both the MetroJet and GermanWings incidents were deliberate acts of destruction, not accidents in any common understanding of the word, or indeed in the sense defined by the Convention on International Civil Aviation. The Chicago Convention, as it's also known, defines an accident as: An occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft [...] in ...


20

IATA issues duplicate airline codes to regional airlines where the codes are not likely to overlap, from Wikipedia: Controlled duplicates are issued to regional airlines whose destinations are not likely to overlap, so that the same code is shared by two airlines. This happens because IATA uses a 2-letter code for for airlines which has a limited range ...


16

Why aren't there many level 3's in the US? Let's check the IATA criteria: A Level 3 airport is one where: a) Demand for airport infrastructure significantly exceeds the airport’s capacity during the relevant period; b) Expansion of airport infrastructure to meet demand is not possible in the short term; c) Attempts to resolve the ...


15

In short, the people sitting over the nose wheel use the ICAO codes, and the people in the back use the IATA codes. The IATA is the International Airline Transport Association. The ICAO is the International Civil Aviation Organization. While you are correct, the IATA does not have more than 17500 codes, their primary concern isn't creating codes for every ...


13

I don't know, but ... If you look at the IATA application form you will see there is nowhere for the airline to indicate the code it would like to receive. I imagine many new airlines might indicate a preference in an accompanying letter (e.g. they would like a code starting with a specific letter) If you look at the allocated codes you can see that, ...


11

Good question, no good answer. In the ICAO system, the identifier ZZZZ is reserved by that agency to designate on flight plans that the airport does not have an ICAO code assigned (not all airports do; for instance Qualicum Beach Airport in British Columbia is TCCAA registered and has TC and IATA codes but no ICAO code). There is no specific combination of ...


10

From the IATA link: [W]e were all shocked and horrified by two deliberate acts—the destruction of Germanwings 9525 and Metrojet 9268. They are not, however, included in the accident statistics as they are classified as deliberate acts of unlawful interference. RE comment: How is it reasonable to talk about safety if we exclude non-jet, non-...


8

You're right that two airports can share the same 3-letter code, but they're not necessarily IATA codes (they could actually be FAA identifiers, or just locally assigned codes). In implementing Otto the Autopilot in our chat room, for commands like !!weather JFK, I needed to find a way to reliably convert IATA codes to ICAO codes. I ended up using the same ...


8

It's a Russian internal city or airport identifier. Many small cities don't have IATA codes, but do have internal Russian codes. This system is called CRT (Center for schedules and tariffs, ЦРТ, Центр Расписаний и Тарифов) named after a department in the organization that manages them (see below). Wikipedia article cited below claims it's also called "...


8

ICAO is headquartered in Montreal because that was the result of a vote by the founding members (PICAO is Provisional ICAO): Why was Montreal selected? While insisting on the excellent hospitality offered since of the beginnings of PICAO by the federal, provincial and municipal authorities, the delegates described Montreal like a roundabout of the ...


8

It starts with the International Telecommunications Union, which assigned radio call sign prefixes for each country in 1927. The OK prefix was assigned to Czechoslovakia. Other than the largest countries (US, USSR, UK, France, etc.) there seems to be no specific pattern to the assignments. When ICAO assigned aircraft registration prefixes for each country it ...


7

Airports are assigned IATA codes when an air servicer (airline, cargo operator, etc) requests a code for an airport. The code is requested by filling out a form on the IATA web site. This is not done by the airport management because it is meant to be for use by a commercial operation, and not the airport itself. IATA codes don't really have a lot of ...


6

Yes it does happen. A city can build a new airport, in which case it will usually get a new ICAO code, but will get the original IATA (city) code. For example, Oslo changed from Fornebu to Gardemoen - Fornebu is ENFB, Gardemoen is ENGM; the OSL code was Fornebu but uis now Gardemoen. A city can rename its airport for political reasons, so again the codes ...


6

According to this thread, pretty much anything with scheduled air service will have an IATA code to facilitate booking. From looking at the FAA data, it looks like everything with more than 10,000 enplanements (enplanement=1 passenger boards an aircraft) is considered a "primary" airport, and they all have an IATA code unless the airport is strictly general ...


6

Long story short, there is no such thing and @jwenting's comment is almost certainly correct (see edit below). The only Google hits for "Russian IATA code" (apart from this question) are a series of Wikipedia articles on Russian airports, either on wikipedia.org itself or on other sites that have obviously scraped Wikipedia for content. All the articles (...


6

As of June 2015, fewer than 2500 IATA codes have been assigned. Codes can be reassigned over time. According to the Wikipedia article on IATA codes there have been several IATA codes that have been reassigned. IATA has a mechanism for assigning these airport codes that's available online. Although your original calculation came to some 17000 possible codes, ...


6

It's obviously an error in that Wikipedia page. The "5000 airlines with IATA codes" text actually links to: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_airline_codes which lists lots of airlines (over 6000), but most of those have ICAO (3 letter) codes, but not IATA (2 letter) codes.


6

It depends on whether it should be reliable enough to be used operationally. If yes, I don’t know one and would to the best of my knowledge advise spending some sort of money. If no, maybe openflights.org could help?


5

According to IATA Airport Handling Manual, safety cones should be conical in shape be of a minimum height of 750 mm (22.2″) have a minimum base weight of 4.53 kg (10 lbs) be orange in color with reflective striping.


4

IATA themselves say it's a three-letter code: Airlines and CRSs [computer reservations systems] may request the assignment of a unique three-letter code to identify an airport The UN trade locations coding also says the same thing: when a three-letter code is used alone to indicate a location, it designates the name of an airport or location as ...


4

I looked it up in the corresponding IATA document and I can confirm it is 781. Sadly I think I am not allowed to attach any kind of proof from the document but the source of my information is IATA document 8803 - Aicraft Types in version no. 28.


3

Yes. It's a pretty big deal so it won't happen often. Changing the major airport for a city is a big reason. I think both Denver and Austin did this (new airport opened with a different code, then took over the old airport code). Renames can also happen. JFK used to be IDL.


3

This question was covered over on travel.stackexchange and seems like there is a European reg on it. In Europe, the question is covered by Regulation EC 300/2008. Annex I, section 5.3 reads Baggage reconciliation Each item of hold baggage shall be identified as accompanied or unaccompanied. Unaccompanied hold baggage shall not be ...


3

IOSA is basically an audit program under IATA. It is not a regulatory regime and as such is different from the FAA, EASA etc, which have force of law. In fact, IOSA is only one of the various audits offered by IATA, which include: IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) IATA Safety Audit for Ground Operations (ISAGO) IATA Standard Safety Assessment ...


3

I think your question actually deserves a second answer, approaching it from another direction. You ask "How can IATA make this claim?" What is actually being claimed? In fact, the claim is quite slippery, and you'll notice that it is expressed in multiple different ways, with different meanings, in different reports. These include: "no accidental hull ...


3

The short answer is yes, With larger airlines, they may own and manage their IT infrastructure at central hubs, so the airline will need to ensure their software works with their chosen peripherals. At smaller airports where this is not possible, many airports use a common use computer platform, managed by both the airport authority and commercial IT vendors....


3

SPML is Special Meal, differs from airline to airline. VGML is vegan, i.e. not even dairy products are used. Unlike vegetarian were animal products can be used, say eggs or milk. Source: Wikipedia The official document (behind a paywall) can be found here: IATA Manuals.


3

IATA codes are not unique. There simply aren't enough of them and they are expensive to maintain. Additionally the concept of an airline is a little fluid. The simplest issue to deal with are controlled duplicates, where 2 airlines that are geographically seperated share an IATA. Another key issue is where an airline may have one commercial brand but ...


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